(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "History of Wayne County, Indiana : together with sketches of its cities, villages and towns"

GEN 



ALLEN COUNTY PUBLIC LIBRARY 



3 1833 01787 4196 



GENEALOGY 
,977.201 
W36H 
.2 



\^ 




^'§VH&cj<bevoets.New^°^ 




CJ^^O^C ^v^^ej2^-^>^t-^ 



HISTORY 



OF 



WAYNE COUNTY. 



INDIANA, 



TOGK'l'HKR WITH SKETCHES OF ITS CITIES, VILLAGES AND TOWNS, 

KDUCATIONAL, RELIGIOUS, CIVIL, MILITARY, AND POLITICAL 

HISTORY, PORTRAITS OF PROMINENT PERSONS, AND 

BIOGRAPHIES OF REPRESENTATIVE CITIZENS. 







Vol. II. 




: 




' 


IliliUSTKATED. 


CHICAGO: 

INTER-STATE PUBLISHING CO 

1884. 



"> 



TABLE OF CONTENTS. 
122593 1 

HISTORY OF WAYNE COUNTY, 



CHAPTER I. 

The City or Richmond. 

An Account of the Origin anrl Growth of the Beautiful and Prosperous City— Intro- 
ductory— Surroundings— Rank^Progreseion— The City Platted, 1816— Incorporation 
—First Officers— Early Ordinances- First Bvents^Early Inhabitants— Village Im- 
provement—Temperance—Libraries—The Richmond and Broolsfleld Canal Pro- 
jected—Its Failure— Herly Business Interests in Detail 9-28 

CHAPTER II. 

The Growth of Richmond. 

The City in 1840— An Old Settler's Recollections of Richmond in 1847— An Interest- 
ing Review— A Decade Later— The Advance of a Quarter of a Century— Statistics of 
BnsinessandPopulation-Board of Trade— Business Bxchange-Citv Officers from 
1840 to 1884- The Postoffice— Postmasters from 1818 to 1884— Postofflce Business- 
Free Delivery Established-Street Railroads-Express Companies-Gas Works--Fire 
Department- Water- Works 39-bd 

CHAPTER III. 

Industrial Interests of Richmond. 

Account of the Origin and Growth of the Industrial Wealth of .^^e City-Introduc- 
tory-Early Manufacturing Establishments-Early Tanneries, Mills,Breweries Card- 
ino- and Woolen Mills, Foundries. Cotton Mills, Etc-Leading Manufacturing Estab- 
lishments of Later Tiies- Historical Accounts of the Leading Industries of To-day 
-Sders and Incorporators-Busmess Changes-Present Proprietors and Amount 
of Capital Invested-Banks of Richmond-Summary of Business Interests. . ..64-95 

CHAPTER IV. 

Prominent Institutions. 

Charitable, Educational and Benevolent Works-Wernle Orphan's Home--Earlham 
Plac3 Chile ren-s Home-Home for Friendless Women-Young Men s Christian As 
sociation-EarlhamCollec'e- Secret Societies-Masons, Odd Fellows, Knights ol 
Honor? KnightsTf Pythias, Grand Army, Red Men, Etc.-Mornsson Hbrary--Min- 
eral Cabinet— New State Asylum for the Insane •'"-'*" 




Church— First I'resDyterian unurca— uuib^u i,'"'"'.'-'.^^'-"" ^"" puriptian Church— 
Church-First Baptist Church-Mt. Moriah baptist Church -Christian ^^lu^^ 
Evangelical Lutheran Church -St. Paul's Evangelical Lutheian Chuich ^^lon^s 
Church— Catholic Churches 



Biographical Sketches. 



CHAPTER VI. 

154-255 



II. CONTENTS. 

CHAPTER VII. 
Abinotok Township. 

Organized from Washington and Wayne— Settled in 1806— Formed in February, 1837 
—Boundary and Area— AsseBsed Valuation — Population Since 1850— History of Its 
First Settlement— Village of Ahington— Its Growth— Business of 1374 and 1884— 
Churches and Societies— Biographical 256-266 

CHAPTER VIII. 

Boston Township. 

Once a Portion of Wayne— Its Early Settlement— Not Orsjanized until February, 
1835 — Metes and Bounds— The Southeast Township- Population— Its Grand Old 
Pioneers— Topography— Timber and Water — Town Officers— Churches and Schools- 
Boston— Its Early History— Village Not lucorporated— Lodges and Po8tm■l^ters — 
Biographical 267-306 

CHAPTER IX. 

Centre Township. 

Organization— Indian Troubles- Pioneer Life— Early ladustries- Centreville— The 
Old County Seat— Its Eminent Citizens— A Few Anecdotes— Early Events in the 
Town— The First Fire Company— Business Interests — Lodges — Churches of the 
Town and Township— Biographical 307-369 

CHAPTER X. 
Clat Township. 

Organized in 1831— First Election— Enlarged in 1834— Real and Personal Property— 
Population— Gain of Thirteen in Forty Years- Pioneers— Washington- Its Founder 
—Business of 1818 and 1884— Village Wealth— Lodges— Population — Railroads- 
Postmasters— Biographical , 370-394 

CHAPTER XI. 

Franklin Township. 

Organization— Settlement— Early Events— First Mills— Churches— Town of White- 
water—Origin and History— First Merchants, Etc.— Bethel— A Prosperous Village- 
Biographical 395-428 

CHAPTER XII. 

Dalton Township. 

Location and Organization — Date of Existence — Area and Valuation— -Population- 
Its Steady Loss— Aquilla West, in 1S18— Other Pioneer Arrivals— Its Wealih of Soil, 
Water and Drainage — Village of Dalton— When Founded- Business and Professional 
Men — Eranklin— History Condensed— Churches— Biographical 429-456 

CHAPTER XIIL 
Green Township. 

When Located— Boundary Lines— Number of Acres— First Election— Water Supply 
—Population— Valuation— Comparison of Wealth — Early Settlement— Pioneers — 
Business— Williamsburu— When Founded— By Whom Platted— Location - Popula- 
tion—Business of 1870 and 1884— Churches and Lodges— Biographical 457-490 

CHAPTER XIV. 
Harrison Township. 

Organization and Area — Boundary — Wealth and Population— Wtien and by Whom 
Settled— Its Capital Town, Jacksonburg— Oldest Village in the County but One — 
History in General— Mercantile Affairs- Churches acd.Lodges-Postniasters— Bio- 
graphical 491-513 

CHAPTER XV. 
Jackson Township. 

Date of Formation— Area— Wealth— Toposrraphy— When and by Whom Settled- 
Names of Pioneers— Cambridge City— Bu'-iness Energy and Enterprise- Assessed 
Valuation— When Platted— Early Business Men— Manufacturing Establishments- 
Bank— Churches — Lodges — Postmasters — Items— Dublin— Basiness Interests — 
Schoolis, Churches, Valuation — Postmasters — Population -East Qermantown— 
Wealth— Mercantile Interests— Population — Progress- Societies— Biographical . 
514-608 



CONTENTS. 



III. 



CHAPTEK Xyi. 
jBFrBRSON Township. 

Its Metes and Bounds— Its Lauded Area— Wealth aud Vote— Topography— Settle 
ment— The Pioneers— Churches— Hagerstown— When Platted— Business in 1839— 
Additions— What It Contained in 1874— Business in 1884— Population— Churches— 
Postmasters— Lodges and Societies— Biographical 609-636 

CHAPTER XVII. 

New Gardbn Totvnship. 

Orgaaization- Origin of the Name— Early Settlers— North Carolina Friends-Inci- 
dents of Pioneer Life— Indian Shot by White Man— A Mynterious Murder— The 
Town of Fountain City, Formerly Newport— Auti-Slavery Worlc— Levi Coffin Presi- 
dent of the Underground Railway— Churches of the Township— Biographical, .. 
t 627-678 

CHAPTER XVIII. 

Perrt Towkship. 

One of the Original Six— The Northwestern Township- Boundary— Area— Assessed 
Valuation-Population— Early Settlers— Justices- Economy— When Laid Out— First 
Sale of Lots— Incorporation- First Businfss Men— Doctors and Postmasters— Mil- 
ling Interests— Counterfeiters— Weather Reports— Churches— Societies — Storms- 
Biographical 679-717 

CHAPTER XIX. 
Washington Township. 

Organization— Original Extent— First Election— Physical Features- Early Settle- 
ment—A Settler's Fort-First Mills-Milton-Au Old and Prosperous Town-Important 
Events— Business Interests- Efl'ect of the Completion of the Whitewater Canal— 
Hoosier Drill Works— Dorsey Machine Works— Churches aud Lodges— Biographical 
718-762 

CHAPTER XX. 

Wayne Township. 

The Oldest Settlement in the County— Its Organization— Its Original Extent— Phys- 
ical Features— Growth in Wealth and Pjpulation— iQteresting Statistics— Biograph- 
ical 763-806 

CHAP lER XXI. 

Webster Township. 

Organization— Earliest Settlers— Later Settlers— Pioneer Customs— The Village of 
Webster — Early Events — Dover Meeting — Other Religious Organizations — Lodges — 
Biographical 807-83 i 



BIO<^KAPIIIGS. 



Adamson, P. M 692 

Addleman, J. P 400 

Aiken, Ezekiel 154 

Alexander, W. W 154 

Allen, John 377 

Arnett, Mahlon 639 

Arnett, Willis 639 

Austin, J. O 323 

Bailey, CM 543 

Baker, O. R 466 

Baldwin, C. A 37'7 

Baldwin, Jonathan 154 

Baldwin, Na'han 434 

Bales, Geo. W 435 

Ball, Elkanah 730 

Ballanger, William 692 

Ballard N. H 1.55 

Ballengcr, Ezra 465 

BalliQc, George 156 

Barnes, John 640 

Barnes, S. F 640 

Barnes, Shapleigh 640 

Barrett, Martha 543 

Burton, Barnabas 401 

Barton, D. B 765 

Barton, Wm. E 402 

Bartsch, Reuben 544 



Bean, John 466 

Bearo, Enos 498 

Beard, I. N 499 

Beard, J. W .500 

Beeson, BeDJamiu 731 

Beeson, Benjamin 435 

Beeson, Benj. B ".437 

Beeson, B. F VSi 

Beison, F. R 732 

Beeson, I. W 438 

Beeson, Jabez 500 

Beeson, M. D 73i 

Beeson, Olhniel 733 

Bteson, Thomas 441 

Beeson, Thomas 733 

Bell, J. C 544 

Bell, Josiah 545 

Benson, John 641 

Bethge, B. P 156 

Binkiey, P. S 500 

Black, J. N 324 

Black, J. W 324 

Bond, A. D 378 

Bond, A. D 545 

Bond, Cornelias 812 

Bond, H. T 379 

Bond, Joseph 813 

Bond, Mahlan 813 



Bond, M. H 402 

Bond, N.I 467 

Bond, William 814 

Bond, W. C 330 

Boren, A. R 641 

Boren, S.M 641 

Boren, T. E 642 

Boroughs, .). C 501 

Bo8low,G. R 159 

Hoswell. Ezra 1.59 

Boweu, J. R 403 

Bowman, Iihamar 621 

Bowman, John 621 

Boyd, Abiram .546 

Boyd, J. A .547 

Bojd, J. C 766 

Boyd, S. K 324 

Boyd, S. M 468 

Bovd,S. S 547 

Boyd, William ?48 

BradDurv, A M .519 

Bradbury, A. W 549 

Brattett, T. W. 156 

Branson, Isaiah 767 

Brooks, Jacob 734 

Brooks John, Sr 380 

Brooks, John, Jr 382 

Brown, Benjamin 276 



IV. 



CONTENTS. 



Brown, David fi32 

Brown,Jas.B. andJohnE 443 

Brown, Seth 7fiS 

Brumfleld, SolomoB 335 

Bulla, Daniel.... 768 

Bulla, J. M 277 

Bunnell, R. W 383 

Burgess, Eliza D 550 

BurgesB, J. P 279 

Burnett, J. P 692 

Burney, Jobn 550 

Burrie, Thomas 326 

Cain, Milton 693 

Callaway, (i. W 735 

Callaway, John 551 

Campbell, Howard 160 

Campbell, Thomas 160 

Campbell, Wm. H 160 

Carpenter, W. T 160 

Carr, Samuel 502 

Cates, Ephraim 469 

Cates, Jesse 470 

Catey, Samuel 471 

Chamness, Larkin 442 

Chamness, William 443 

Charles, Daniel 643 

Charman, R. Q..'. 326 

Cheesman, Nehemiah.. .443 

Cheesman, K C 444 

Chcesman, Wallace 44i 

Chenoweth, Elias 403 

Chenoworth, J. B 644 

Clark, G.E 693 

Clark, J. B 694 

Clark, T. E 694 

ClarK, Thomas 814 

Clark, William 695 

Clawson, Abner 472 

Clements, Wm. A 644 

Clements, W.J 473 

Clevenger, T. C 326 

Coate, Elijah 645 

Cofleld, S. K 426 

Coffin, C.H 163 

Coffin, Elijah 161 

Coggshall, Lafayette 473 

Coggeshell, Melviu 646 

Commons, David 327 

Commons, J. A 328 

Commons, W. S 329 

Comthwait, R. L 736 

Conely, John 695 

Conkliu, Felix 553 

Conner, James 646 

Cook, Harrison 553 

Cooke, J. H 163 

Cooper, Ezekiel 553 

Cox. J. M 553 

Cox, J. N 770 

Cox, Kftbert 771 

Craighead. J. B 164 

Crampton, Samuel 773 

Cranor, Lewis W 696 

Cranor, Milo 474 

Cranor, Thomas 475 

Crawford, D. B 164 

Creitz, D. Z 554 

Crivel, Henry 165 

Crocker, A. E 165 

Crull, George 554 

Custer, Jacob 555 

Cutter, Henry lort 

Daugheriy, A. K 383 

Davenport, J. F 166 

Davis, A. L 555 

Davis, Charles .503 

Davis, Harvey 647 

Davis, H. T 167 

Davis, Norton .556 



Davis, Rachel 696 

Davis. W. H 774 

Day,H. J.. 632 

Dean, J. L 697 

Delap, Robert 329 

Dennis, Branson 444 

Dennis, John 775 

Dennis, Lindsey 445 

Dennis, Nathan 445 

Dennis, Osborn 446 

Dennis, Thomas 447 

Dennis, Wilson 44S 

Dilks, W. W 777 

Dillman, E. B 279 

Dingledey, Rev. John.. .168 

Doddridge, Isaac 736 

Doddridge, M. D 738 

Dodge, T. H 169 

Dormer, Wm. B 169 

Dougan,John B 169 

Dougherty, J. S. * J. P.. 503 

Dougherty, Wm. H 504 

Downing, H. R 170 

Drischel, Andrew 557 

Druley, Dennis 280 

Druiey, John 280 

Drulev, Levi 281 

Druley, Levi G 281 

Druley, Nathan 283 

Druley, Smith 283 

Duffee, H. N 404 

Du Hadway, C. S 170 

Dulin, W. 1 171 

Dunbar, A. B 330 

Dunbar, T. G 331 

DwiggiBS, Robert 648 

Dwigglns, Samuel... 649 

Dynes, J. F 331 

Early, Geo. P 171 

Ebert, Emil E.57 

Ebert.F.K 557 

Edgerton, C F 649 

Edgerton , N athan 777 

Eliason. A. J... 332 

Eliason, Joshua, Sr 333 

Eliason, Joshua, Jr 333 

Eliason, T. C 331 

Eliason, W. S 505 

Ellaberger, Jacob. . ...557 

Elliott, C. B 558 

Elliott, Exum .558 

Elliott, Wm. K 649 

Elwell, Eli 739 

Emswller, Geo. P 172 

Endsley, James.... . .383 

Krvin, J. H 559 

Erwin, Satiuel 778 

Esteb, I. M 283 

Evans, Wm. H 284 

Farlow, Homer 334 

Parlow, Stephen 384 

Pender, H. L 363 

Pender, Jacob 263 

Pender, J. H 263 

Ferguson, Linville 739 

Ferguson, N imrod 740 

Ferris, Joseph 741 

Kett.a, G. H 779 

Finney, J. J 173 

Pinney, Joseph 650 

Fisher, Edward 404 

Fisher, E. N 4U5 

Floia, A. W 742 

Ford, J. G 175 

Fountain, John .5.59 

Pouts David 285 

Fox, H. A 651 

Fox, Simon 175 

•Franzman, Philip 560 



Prazer, Paul 334 

Furnace, Robert 176 

Gaar, Abram 176 

Gaar.C. A 180 

Gaar, J. M 180 

Gaar, Larkin 286 

Gaar, S. W 180 

Gause, Nathan 560 

Gard, J. T 743 

Garwood, N.P 780 

Gentry, David 235 

Getz, Jacob 181 

Gibson, S. P 623 

Gilbert, Josiah 181 

Girton, Sylvester 286 

Gormon, LA 182 

Gough, C. T .561 

Gower, Peter 335 

Graham, W. B 405 

Grave, Warner 781 

Graver, John 561 

Graves, Howell 182 

Graves, J. C 406 

Graves, Nathan 407 

Grave, William 781 

Gray, J. E .562 

Gray, Joseph 563 

Greene, T. C 336 

Greisinger, Jacob 563 

Hadley, James 564 

Hadley, J. C 183 

Hadley, W. B 184 

Haines, J. W 186 

Haisley, David 407 

Hamm, G. A 506 

Hampton, J. D 782 

Hardman, Benjamin 564 

Harlan, Elihu 407 

Harlan, J. T 408 

Harlan, J. G 408 

Harlan, Nathan 409 

Harlan, Stephen 409 

Harold, Adam 565 

Harrington, Timothy 651 

Harris, Abram H. . . 653 

Harris, Addison H 652 

Harris, Benjamin 184 

Harris, Hon. B. L 384 

Harris, D. M 653 

Harris, D. W 385 

Harris, J. S 653 

Harris, W. H 449 

Harvey, C. J 337 

HaKtiugs, Aaron .565 

Hatfield, John 187 

HawKlns, John 784 

Heacock, Daniel 566 

Heacock, M. S 566 

Healy, Thomas 410 

Heiny, Abraham 567 

Henby, Ell 567 

Hendershot, G. W 506 

Hendrix, Francis 287 

Henley, Samuel 785 

Henly, John 188 

Herman, 8. P 786 

Hiatt, D. W 698 

Hiatt, Riley 784 

Hibberd, J.F 188 

Hill, Albert 787 

Hill, Benjamin 787 

Hill, Nathan 410 

Hill, Robert 190 

Hiudman, G. G 386 

Hindman, S. B 191 

Hinshaw, Rev. P. E 743 

Hittle, O. L 191 

Hockett, W. M 815 

Hodgin, Nathan 654 



CONTENTS. 



Hoda;in, Robert 193 

Hoflman, J.V 568 

Hood,C.L 568 

Hoover, David 788 

Hoover, John 508 

Horney, Andrew 387 

Horney, I. V 789 

Horney, Jesse 338 

Hort, J. W 288 

Hosier, Henderson 507 

Hongh, Moses 654 

Hou.;h, T. C 655 

Hoover, John 5C8 

Howard, I. R 193 

Huddleston, David 569 

Huff, Daniel 655 

Hughes, J. B 192 

Hant, Ammiel 816 

Hunt, C. B 193 

Hunt, Clayton 193 

Hunt,NoahS 411 

Hunt, Wm. M 476 

Hurst, CO 743 

Jackson, Capt. Caleb B.389 

Jackson, Caleb B ... 339 

Jackson, C. F 311 

Jackson, John 569 

Jackson, Lafayette 341 

Jay, Henry 817 

Jay, J.W 194 

Jefiferis, A. D 411 

Jefferis, Whi. C 411 

Jeffery, Lewis 657 

Jenkins, A. M 657 

Jennings, N. M 476 

Johnson, J. W 658 

Johnston, D. W 195 

Jones, H. L 743 

Jones, John 341 

Jones, L. H 343 

Jones, L. M 195 

Jones, Oliver 195 

Jones, Hou . O. T 342 

Jones, Washington 343 

Jones, Wm. H 477 

Jones, Wilson 570 

Jordan, J. W 699 

Jordan, T. J 699 

Jordan, Rev. W.S 571 

Jordon, G. M 449 

Jordon, Wm.D 450 

JuddjThomas 478 

Kates, H. S 196 

Keever, Michael 658 

Reiser, Daniel 571 

Kelley. B. G 572 

Kenworthy, Eli 818 

Kepler, A. T 338 

Kepler, G. T 508 

Kepler, Jotn 573 

Kepler,.r. H 575 

Kepler, Mary M 576 

Kepler, O. A 509 

Kepler, Peter 575 

Kilmer, Eli 289 

Kimes, R. H . 577 

Kimmel, George 744 

Kimmel, Joseph 677 

King, C. W 346 

King, Dorinda J 578 

King, I. Y 479 

King, John L 346 

King, Joseph 347 

King, Jos. L 347 

King,R.H 196 

King, William 818 

King, Wm. F 348 

Kinsey, Isaac 745 

Kitterman, S. D 349 



Knollenbers:, Geo. H 197 

Krouskoff, Justus 289 

Lackey, P. R 197 

Ladd, J. D 479 

Lamar, Nathan 450 

Lamb, A. L 699 

Lamb, F. M 2(0 

Lamb, James 291 

Lamb, Milo 700 

Lamb, M. L 480 

Laud, H . N 193 

Lantz, L. F 198 

Larkin, Samuel 746 

Lashley, J. T 349 

Laufman, Rev. R. D 389 

Lawrence, L. L 199 

Lee, David S 746 

Leeson, H. C 350 

Leeson, S. O 578 

Lemon & Clark 199 

Lemon, Rev. O. V 200 

Lewis, A. W 481 

Lewis, Caleb 747 

Lewis, W. A 482 

Lichtenf els, P 200 

Little, David 790 

Lloyd, Benjamin 791 

Locke, J. A 452 

Logan, T. P 201 

Lumpkins, R. M 452 

Lyle,J.S 201 

Macy, H. L 482 

Macy, L. H .578 

Maier, Geo. J 202 

Manning, Geo. B 700 

Marine, B. C 659 

Marine, Billy 660 

Marine, Jonathan, Sr 412 

Marine, Jonathan, Jr 413 

Marine, M. W 4i3 

Marine, O. M 661 

Marlatt, J. W 749 

Marlatt, Thomas .748 

Marshall, Thomas 701 

Marson, J. W.... 579 

Martin, B. F 791 

Martin, B. L ..792 

Martin, N. W 414 

Martiudale, J. W 389 

Mason, Wm. J 580 

Mather, Samuel 661 

Maudlin, Mark 35 1 

Mauk, John R 580 

Maxwell, B. F 582 

McCaffery, James 582 

McClure, N. D 793 

McConaha, George 351 

McConaha, Simon .352 

McConaha, Thomas 352 

McCoy, John 353 

McCoy, Morgan 353 

McGilliard, W. P 662 

McGrew, C. N 750 

McLain, James 291 

McLaughlin, William 750 

McMeans, A. L 203 

McTaggart, C. R 588 

McTaggart, George 583 

Meek, Isaac 292 

Meek, J. R 264 

Meerhoflf, H. H 203 

Mendenhall, Absalom. ..204 

Mendenhall, Nathan 819 

Mendenhall, Rees 794 

Mendenhall, William 453 

Mendenhall, Wm. C 819 

Menk, Daniel 584 

Meredith, H. C 584 

Merritt, John 354 



Meyer, A. W 205 

Middleton, W. H ... 204 

Miles, Lindley 586 

Miles, M.K .mi 

Miller, Isaac \[' '205 

Miller, William 292 

Mills. J. T .'.■.'."■■■662 

Minck, Emil 207 

Moffett, William .. 206 

Moffltt, Hugh '.'.795 

Moore, Rev. A. B .*. .293 

Moore, Ira 207 

Moore, Jacob S....' !!293 

Moore, James 796 

Moore, James W .......73 

Moore, John .294 

Moore, Jonathan.. ... .'."."208 

Moore, Robert 797 

Moore, Samuel 1 294 

Moore, Wm. H 7,52 

Moormann, J. H .... .20Q 
Moorman, Benjamin. ....414 

Moorman, Henry 663 

Moorman, Richmond 415 

Morgan, Nathan . 798 

Morgan, Nathan, Jr 210 

Morris, Ellas 509 

Morris, R. R 210 

Morrit-, Samuel 687 

Morrisson, J. L 211 

Morrow, Elihu 212 

Morton, W. S. T 354 

Mote, E. J 213 

Myers, Moses 5g7 

Myers, Moses E 588 

Newby, Franklin 588 

Newman, E. B 754 

Newman, Jonathan 7.53 

Nichols, Harrison 416 

Nicholson, Abner 390 

Nicholson, Timothy 214 

Noble, Wm. T 215 

Noland, J. P 217 

Oler, Adam 702 

Olvey, E. K 702 

Osborn, Charles....'!!!.. 703 
Osborn, C. W... .... 705 

Osborn David ....295 

Osborn, B. B 707 

Osborn, John 707 

Osborn, Linden 6K4 

Osborn. Zachariah 296 

Oster, Rev. Andrew 529 

Otten, Henry 355 

Overman, Isaac 799 

Overman, N. S 416 

Palm, Henry M 588 

Palmer, Daniel S2J 

Palmer, E. DeF 217 

Parks, Curtis 296 

Parry.J. W 218 

Parry, Samuel 664 

Parry, William 218 

Peacock, Levi 820 

Peelle, John, Jr 355 

Peelle, Hou. s. J 219 

Peirce, Benjamin 755 

Peirce,L A 623 

Peirce, Lewis 709 

Peltz, J. B... 319 

Petty, David 709 

Petty, Eli 624 

Petty, Josiah 710 

Philbrooks, J. H 219 

Phillips, Abram 220 

Pierce. A. O 391 

Pike, Elam 665 

Pike, Jesse 589 

Pirn, Jacob 589 



VI. 



CONTENTS. 



Pitts, Harman 665 

Pitts, Samuel 485 

Preston, J. R 220 

Preston, R. S 666 

Prichett, Jolin 356 

Prichett, J.M 356 

Puckett, Nathan 821 

Pyle, D.S 417 

Pyle, Isaac 418 

Railebacli, Joel 800 

Ratliff, Cornelius 221 

Ratliflf. Hon. J. C 222 

Ray, William 296 

Reece, J. P 666 

Reece, John 667 

Reece, O. H 358 

Reed, Wm. B 590 

Reid, D. G 223 

Reid, Daniel 223 

Reynolds, B. T 510 

Reynolds, C. C 667 

Rhodes, J. J 418 

Rich, Wm. C 801 

Richter, J. T. and N. H..486 

Rife, Daniel 297 

Rife, Rev. Jacob 297 

Rife,J.J 298 

Riley, Robert 419 

Rinehai-t, J. F 298 

Robbiup, D. B 710 

Robbins, Geo. v\ 711 

Robbius, H. M .358 

Roberts, Jonathan 225 

Robinson, F. W 225 

Rohe. J. H 358 

Koper, John 299 

Rosa, E. I? 226 

Roth, C. E 359 

Rotherniel, Joseph 590 

Routh, C. W 591 

Russell, J. J 3.59 

Russell, J. S 360 

Russell, Vinnedge 361 

Rutledge, J. W 591 

Saintmyer, Samuel 487 

Scautlaud, Geo. W 712 

Scarce, Wm. D 668 

Schneider, Philip 226 

Schwedes, Philip 593 

Schwegman, J. G 227 

Scott, A. F 227 

Scott, E. P 511 

Scott, F.E 361 

Scott, J. A 512 

Scott, John 513 

Scott, J. W 592 

Seaney, I. N 299 

Seaney, Wm.G.... ......300 

Sedgwick, John 228 

Shaw, Edward 229 

Shetfer, Jacob 230 

Sheffer, John 301 

Shideler, A. V 593 

Shoff, C. S 594 

Shoft-, J.S 594 

Short, R. S 362 

Sh off, Rudolph 595 

Shroyer, H.A 595 

Shults, G. W 596 



Beeson, I. W.. Frontispiece. 

Beeson, Benj. B 436 

Beeson, Mrs. Benj. B 437 

Gates, Jesse 1,52 

Gates, Mrs. Jesse 153 

Charman.R. G .326 

Gharman, Martha 3J7 

Crawford, D. B. 64 



Shurman, Geo 231 

Shute, Robert C 231 

Shute, Samuel 232 

Skinner, Joshua 420 

Smelser, Isham 362 

Smelser, Jacob, Sr 301 

Smelser, Winfleld 301 

Smith, I. N 598 

Smith, J. A 596 

Smith.J.R 421 

Smith, J. P 233 

Smith, J. W 233 

Smith, S. G 363 

Smith, Thompson 488 

Smith, Wm. H 363 

Snider, F. V 364 

Snyder, J.M 365 

Southworth, Albert . ..59S 

Sprigg. E. D 599 

Stace & Crocker 234 

Staftbrd, F. n 234 

Stahr, Wm. P 600 

Stanley, Levi ... 302 

Starr, G. W 235 

Starr, Jesse 80:i 

St. Clair, J. W 756 

Stephens, Spencer 265 

Stevens, J. G 3(i4 

Stevens, W. G 365 

Stevi^'uson, Geo. W 303 

Stigleman, G. W 237 

Stirewalt, Rev. M. J 601 

Stonecipher, Joseph 602 

Storch, John 602 

Stout, O. B 624 

Strattau, S. S 238 

Study, A. II 238 

Study. Wm. H 668 

Stutson, C. L 392 

Suft'rain, John 803 

Sulser, Hiram 303 

Suplee, Hiram 421 

Swain, J. W 239 

Swain, Thomas 713 

Swallow, Ephraim 003 

Swallow, R. G 603 

Sweuey, I. F 7.56 

Swinn, Henry 603 

Ta!helm,H. W 241 

Taylor, D. R 422 

Taylor, J. E 241 

Taylor, Nathan 304 

Taylor, S. R 366 

Teague, I. C 242 

Thomas, Benjamin 669 

Thomas, Enos 243 

Thomas, H. W 422 

Thomas, J.W 423 

Thomas, I.uke 670 

Thamas, Peter 669 

Thomas, W. L 244 

Thorn, Benjamin, Jr 489 

Thornburg, J. H 455 

Thornburgh, Dempsey . . .454 

Thornburgh, Elvin 713 

Thornburgh, J. H 625 

Thornburgh, J.M... . 714 

Thornburgh, Milton 604 

Thornburgh, Wm. L 714 

PORTRAITS. 

Kelley, B. G. 



Tillson, Hosea 367 

Tillson, H. G 427 

Timberlake, Edward 305 

Tindall, J. W 821 

Townsend, Wm. H 423 

Trueblood, Alpheus . 674 

Turner. Eli 424 

Ulrich,Daniel 456 

Underbill, Alfred 392 

Underbill, John 714 

Vaughan, E.G ..244 

Vinton, E. G 604 

Walker, A. C 626 

Wallace, John 757 

Wallace, John 758 

Walters, 0. F 245 

Waring, W. P ...246 

Waseon, Fleming 803 

Wasson, Joseph 246 

Watson, James 305 

Watt, Robert 753 

Wayman, J. V 605 

Weekly, Isaiah 605 

Wefel, G. H 247 

Weller, A. A 306 

Wesler, J. C 424 

Westcott, J. M 248 

Wetherald, H. L 804 

Weyl J. L 716 

Whelan, Kosciusko 606 

Whippo, G. H 674 

Whitacre, J. R 822 

White, James 806 

White, Oliver 607 

Wickemeyer, Rev. 11 247 

Wiggins, D.P 249 

Wiley, Martin 425 

Willetts.Elisha 759 

Williams, Christopher. ..675 

Williams, D.B 716 

Williams, Henry 393 

Williams, Jacob 675 

Williams, James 760 

Williams, Judge Jesse. . .368 

Williams, J. M 716 

Williams, Joseph 717 

Williams, LaFayette 368 

Williams, Samuel 676 

Williams, William 676 

Williams, Wm. R 676 

Wilson, Isaac 761 

Wilson, Jehu 761 

Wilson, J.W 252 

Wilson, O.L 394 

Wilson, Oliver 489 

Winkler, Conrad 252 

Wi'-sler, B. F 607 

Witmer, B. M 761 

Wooaard,Gader 677 

Woodard, G. J 677 

Woodard, Luke 678 

Wright, P. H 425 

Wright, Samuel 426 

Wright, Washington 369 

Yates, Oliver 252 

Yates, S.O 253 

Young, Rev. J. J 253 

Zeller, D. K 2.54 

Zimmer, Christian. . . '^ 



216 

Kepler. John 714 

Kepler, Angeline 715 

Kepler, Pe' er 574 

Kepler, Mai/ A 575 

King, Wm. P 307 

Mank, J. R 650 

McCoy, Morgan 354 



McCoy, Elizabeth 325 

Moffitt, Hugh 29 

Southworth, Albert 598 

Stevenson. Geo. W 267 

Swallow, Ephraim 101 

Swallow, Sarah A 105 

Wright, Peter H 750 



HISTORY OF WAYNE COUNTY. 



CHAPTER I. 



THE CITY OF RICHMOND. 



An Account of the Origin and Growth of the Beautiful 
AND Prosperous City, — Introductory. — Surroundings. — 
Rank. — Progression. — The City Platted, 1816. — Incor- 
poration. — First Officers. — Early Ordinances. — First 
Events. — Early Inhabitants. — Village Improvement. — 
Temperance. — Libraries. — The Richmond and Brookfield 
Canal Projected, — Its Failure. — Early Business Inter- 
ests IN Detail. 

The city of Richmond, Ind., stands without a rival in the 
beauty of her location, the wealth of her surroundings, the 
solidity of her growth, and in the refinement, culture and hos- 
->itality of her citizens. The rich agricultural country which 
lies all around her, the great productiveness of which finds a 
market at her door, the enterprise and energy of her business 
men, all combine to make her what she is — the Qneen City of 
the State. Resting proudly upon the banks of the beautiful 
and winding Whitewater, looking upon its clear waters, and 
the valley itself a beautiful panorama of scenic magnificence, 
why indeed should not Richmond be proud and her people 
glory in the brightness of the present, and a future even more 
g\^\wing in its promises ? 

Richmond stands upon an oval crest on the east bank of 
the Whitewater River, or what is called its East Branch, 
and the beauty of its location is enhanced by its perfect 
drainage which all tends to the valley and the waters of the 
Whitewater a hundred feet below, thus making it in healtli- 
2 9 



10 HISTORY OF WAYNE COUNTY. 

fulness without a peer in the State. Her death rate is won- 
derfully low, as sta2:nant pools and miasmatic bottom-lands 
form no part of her surroundings, and the pure air which is 
found here is not of an enervating nature, but gives energy 
to the man and elasticity to his steps. Her situation being: a 
salubrious one has been one great cause of her rapid progress 
to material wealth. The soil is mostly loam, over a subsoil 
of gravel, and this rests upon the limestone rock which under- 
lies the whole country. The channel of the Whitewater will 
average from 400 to 500 feet in width, and the bed of the 
stream is fully 100 feet below the site of Richmond. The 
stream is formed by three smaller branches which come from 
the north, the northeast and the east, called respectively the 
West Fork, Middle Fork and East Fork of the East Branch of 
the Whitewater, and in ages past has cut for itself a winding 
channel through the soil and the underlying nearly horizontal 
strata of limestone rock. Take the city thus altogether with 
its wealth, location, its climate of rare life-giving qualities, 
and it is a marvel in the history of the State. It is substan- 
tially built, and it has within its area a large number of mass- 
ive brick and stone blocks that in architectural beauty, finish 
and solidity will vie with an}^ city in the State. Its educational 
advantages are superior, and its societies, lodges, industrial 
homes, all show that charity is engrafted in the hearts of the 
people. Its business and manufacturing interests and its 
great freighting facilities give it a prominence as one of the 
leading commercial centers of the State, while its future in 
this regard is destined to place it ever in the front rank- of 
commercial cities. Its wide and well-paved streets, its beau- 
tiful residences and cultivated surroundings, its fine churches 
and public-school buildings, give to it not only a home-like 
appearance, but metropolitan in its make-up, showing that its 
citizens have seen much of this world and profited by their 
opportunities. 

Richmond is situated nearly due east of Indianapolis, the 
capital of the State, a distance of sixty-eight miles, north of 
Cincinnati about seventy-four miles, and on no less than three 
trunk lines of railway. Its local lines of travel and commu- 
nication from every section of the county and in the adjoin- 



CITY OF RICHMOND. 12 

ing State is by well-graveled turnpikes, besides the railroads, 
which give every portion of the county railroad comrannica- 
tion and turnpike with their capital city and the commercial 
emporium of Central Western Ohio and Eastern Indiana. 
The freedom of access to all parts of the country and the 
facilities thus given the people to find a large and healthy 
market for all articles brought within her limits, has caused 
Kichmond to grow and prosper. There has been no period 
when speculative activity ran riot, followed by business stag- 
nation, taking years to recover. Thus, if she has not grown 
as rapidly as some Western towns, neither has she suffered 
the depression which has caused not only the ill effect of too 
rapid growth, but has actually caused the death of many thus 
affected. 

Richmond ranked the eighth city in population in the State 
and sixth in wealth in 1875, and while in that year her debt 
amounted to $186,972, it is now, Jan. 1, 1884, less than $40,- 
000. This hatter sum will be due in 1889, and will all be 
promptly paid at maturity, showing the healthy financial 
standing of the city. Now, with a population close on to 
15,000, comparatively speaking free from debt, with schools, 
colleges and churches, with beautiful surroundings, handsome 
residences, massive business blocks and energetic, refined and 
cultivated people, there is nothing in the future of Richmond 
but what promises a rich fruition. 

The progress of Richmond from 1816 to 1884, in general 
terms, has thus been given, but her growth in detail requires 
more space, and it will be given here, and also the names of 
those who contributed to her prosperity, by engaging in busi- 
ness, and by such acts as have shown them public-spirited 
citizens. Richmond's advancement has been due to the en- 
ergy and far-sighted people of every generation that have 
found a home within her limits, and this has placed her in 
the proud position she holds among the cities of the country. 

WHEN PLATTED. 

Richmond was the third village platted in Wayne County, 
Salisbury being first, in 1811, Centerville second, in 1814, and 
Richmond third, in 18 L6. Nearly a decade had passed since 



12 HISTORY OF WAYNE COUNTY. 

the county had been iirst settled. Fully three-fourths of that 
time the ground upon which Richmond stood had been culti- 
vated as a farm, and corn and other productions had been, 
annually raised where now stand massive blocks of brick build- 
ings and other evidences of a progressive age and an ener- 
getic people. 

The ground was owned by John Smith and Jeremiah Cox, 
and the former proposed to Mr. Cox to lay out a town. This 
Mr. Cox at first declined, saying, " I would rather see a 
buck's tail than a tavern-sign." Notwithstanding this re- 
fusal Mr. Smith went ahead and employed David Hoover to 
lay off a portion of his land for a town, who did so, along 
Front and Pearl streets, which was the extent of the town 
plat at that time. In Dr. Plummer's history he says: "That 
it is well to look into the early history of Richmond, for re- 
cent as the facts comparatively are (this was in 1857) it is 
already said that Richmond was begun in 1818. The truth 
appears to be that that part of the town lying south of Main 
street (then a section line and dividing the lands of John 
Smith and Jeremiah Cox) was laid out in 1816, and, as it ap- 
pears from the form of the lots, without regard to the varia- 
tion of the magnetic needle. Two years afterward Jeremiah 
Cox made his addition on the north side of Main street. 
This was in 1818." 

The explanation given why North Front street was run 
along the brow of the hill at an acute angle of 47'' with Main 
street is thus stated: "At the time the town was platted by 
David Hoover, there ran along the brow of the hill," says Dr. 
Plummer, "a country road, the first, perhaps, in Wayne 
County. As no splendid anticipations of future greatness 
were entertained for the new town by its proprietors, no pro- 
visions were made for coming necessities, the present alone 
being considered. To continue South Front street directly- 
north would run it into wet ground unsuitable for a 
street, or for building lots; besides, the street would ultimately 
run into the river. On the hill a road was already established ; 
no ground would again have to be relinquished for a street, 
forty feet being probably the width of this road, and the cor- 
ners of Main and Front streets became important points." 



CITY OF RICHMOND. 13 

These are the old streets, and for a long while were the only 
ones in Richmond. 

From the MSS. of David Hoover we iind that the town 
was first called '' Smithville," after the proprietor, but the 
name not giving satisfaction, Thos. Roberts. James Pegg and 
himself were chosen to select another. Roberts proposed 
'' Water ford;" Pegg, " Plainfield," and Mr. Hoover, the 
writer, Richmond, and the last was approved by the lot own- 
ers. Richmond seemed to grow, but it was slow. It seemed 
to hold all it received, and continued to grasp the future with 
a steady hand and progress, the population being 453 iti 1824; 
in 1826, 648, of which 16 were colored; and in 1828, 824, of 
which 427 were white males, 347 white females, and 50 col- 
ored persons. 

INCORPORATION. 

In an ancient-looking pamphlet printed by Elijah Lacey, 
at Richmond, in 1823, and containing the ordinances enacted 
by the trustees of the town of Richmond in the preceding 
years, we find the following record: 

"Agreeably to the provisions of an act of assembly 
passed Jan. 1, 1817, the citizens of the town of Rich- 
mond convened on the 7th of the 9th month (September), 
1818, at the house of Thomas and Justice, for the purpose of 
ascertaining whether they wished said town to be incorpo- 
rated; and pursuant thereto made choice of Thomas Swain* 
President, and Ezra Boswell, Clerk, who, after being legally 
qualified, entered upon theduties of their offices; and on tak- 
ing the state of the polls, it appeared that there were twenty- 
four votes in favor of incorporating, and against it, none. 

" Thomas Swain, Fres. 

"Ezra Boswell, Clerk.'''' 

*' At a meeting of the citizens of the town of Richmond, 
for the election of trustees, held at the house of Thomas and 
Justice on the 14th of the 9th month (September), 1818, it 
appeared on comparing the polls that Ezra Boswell, Thomas 
Swain, Robert Morrisson, John McClain and Peter Johnson 
were duly elected. 

" Thomas Swain, Pres. 

" Ezra Boswell, Clerhy 



14 HISTORY OF WAYNE COUNTY. 

The " house of Thomas and Justice" thus brought into 
notice by the foregoing was a new frame building erected on 
the northeast corner of Main and Front streets, and was de- 
signed for a store, though then unoccupied. In speaking of 
the owners of this building and the first trustees elected Dr. 
Flumraer said Thomas and Justice were both carpenters, and 
were botli dead at the time of his writing, 1857, and three of 
the five trustees had also crossed the dark river. Robert 
Morrisson, whose memory is treasured now, and Peter John- 
son were then living; Ezra Boswell, the brewer, with his mu- 
tilated eye; John McClain, the blacksmith, with his ample 
physical frame, were well remembered by the citizens of later 
date. Thos. Swain, the President, was a dark-skinned, stoop- 
shouldered man, and one of solid sense. Such was the be- 
ginning of Richmond. 

The first of the ordinances in the pamphlet above men- 
tioned defines the duties of the corporation ofiicers. The sec- 
ond, "For restraining immoral and pernicious practices," is 
here given entire : 

" Sec. 1. Beit ordained hy the President and Trustees of 
the Town of Richmond, That it shall be unlawful for any 
person or persons, who shall have attained the age of four- 
teen years or upward, to engage on the first day of the 
week, commonly called Sunday, in sporting, rioting, quarrel- 
ling, or common labor, works of necessity and charity ex- 
cepted, within this corporation ; every person so offending 
shall, on conviction thereof, be fined in the sum of two dol- 
lars. 

" Sec. 2. Be it further ordained^ That it shall be unlaw- 
ful for any tavern-keeper, or other person, to sell or barter 
spirituous liquors within this corporation, on the first day 
of the week, commonly called Sunday, except to travelers, 
or to persons who may want it for medical purposes; every 
person so offending shall, on conviction thereof, be fined in 
the sum of two dollars. 

" Sec. 3. Beit further ordained^ That if any person who 
shall have attained to the age of fourteen years, or upward, 
shall profanely curse, damn, or swear, within this corporation, 
such person, on conviction thereof, shall be fined one dollar 



CITY OF KICHMOND. 15 

for every such offense: Provided^ That the fines imposed in 
one day, on anyone person, do not exceed ten dollars. 

" Sec. 4. Be it further ordained^ That if any person or 
persons shall, on any occasion, or nnder any pretext whatso- 
ever, discharge any gun, pistol , fazee, or any other kind of 
fire-arms within this corporation, such person or persons, 
upon conviction thereof, shall be fined in the sum of fifty cents, 
for each and every such discharge. 

" Sec. 5. Be it further ordained^ That should any person 
or persons unnecessarily run or gallop any horse, mare or 
gelding within the limits of this corporation; or should any 
person or persons play at long-bullets along any street or alley 
within this corporation, such person or persons shall be 
deemed guilty of disorderly conduct, and, upon conviction 
thereof, shall be fined in the sum of one dollar for either or 
each of the offenses enumerated in this section. 

"Sec. 6. Be it further ordained^ That if any person or 
persons sliall be guilty of an assault, or an assault and bat- 
tery, of a riot, rout, or affray, within the bounds of this cor- 
poration, such person or persons shall, on conviction thereof, 
be fined in the sum of two dollars for each and every such of- 
fense. 

" Sec. Y. Be it further ordained^ That if any person shall 
drink ardent spirits to excess, so as to become drunk, within 
this corporation, such person shall be deemed guilty of an 
oftense, and shall, upon conviction thereof, be fined in the sum 
of one dollar for every such act of drunkenness. 

' ' Sec. 8. Be it further ordained. That all prosecutions shall 

be commenced within ten days after the offense shall have 

been committed. 

"John Scott, Pres. 

" Benj. Strattan, "I 
"John Weight, | 
"LeviJessup, I Xrastees. 

" Geo. Springer, | 
" Henry Dunham, I 
" Elijah Lacey, J 

" Attest: Eleazer Hiatt, Clerh. 

"Oct. 26, 1822." 
Another ordinance o»the same date fixes the rates of li- 



16 HISTORY OF WAYNE COUNTY. 

cense of "wax-figure and puppet show exhibitions" at from 
$2 to $3. Market days were fixed as the third and seventh 
day in each week, to continue until nine o'clock in the morn- 
ing, during which time it was unlawful for any person to 
trade " in any other place in this town, except the Market 
House," under a penalty of 50 cents for each offense. 

In 1834 a special charter was granted by the Legislature 
and John Sailor was elected First Burgess; Basil Brightwell, 
Second Burgess; John Finley, Daniel P. Wiggins, Benjamin 
Fulghum, Samuel Stokes, William S. Addleman, John Sufi'- 
rins, William Dnlin, Edmund Crover, Albert C. Blanchard, 
Caleb Shearon, John Hughes, Joseph Parry and Joseph P. 
Osborn, Councilmen; Jacob Sanders, Assessor; Eli Brown, 
Treasurer, and Isaac Barmes, High Constable. These officers 
only held until the regular spring election in May, when a 
new election took place, which resulted as follows: 

First Burgess, John Brady; Second Burgess, Basil Bright- 
well ; Councilmen, John Sufli"rin8, Daniel P. Wiggins, John 
Sailor, Samuel Stokes, Albert C. Blanchard, William S. Ad- 
dleman, Samuel W. Smith, Caleb Shearon, William Dulin, 
JohnM, Laws, Joseph Block, Alexander Stokes, David Hook; 
Assessor, Jacob Sanders; Treasurer, Eli Brown; High Con- 
stable, Charles O'Harra. 

Richmond was governed under this borough charter until 
1840, when it was incorporated as a city, under a charter 
adopted by the citizens, and on the 4th of May the following 
officers were elected: 

Mayor, John Sailor; Councilmen: First Ward, Basil Bright- 
well, Benjamin Strattan; Second Ward, Henry Hollingsworth, 
William Cox ; Third Ward, William Parry, Irvin Reed; 
Fourth Ward, Nathan Morgan, Stephen Swain ; Treasurer, 
John Haines; Marshal, Jesse Meek; Assessor, Eli Brown. 

EARLY EVENTS. 

John Smith opened the first store in 1810. Robert Morris- 
son started another in 1814; then these two formed a partner- 
ship under the firm name of Smith & Morrisson, and a few 
years later were succeeded by the firm of Smith & Frost. 
This store was on lot 45, Pearl stre^. Edward Frost after- 
ward kept a store on lot 33, Front street, in 1823. 



CITY OF RICHMOND. 17 

The first brick house was built in Eichraond by Jno. Smith, 
in ]811, and was considered the finest building of the kind in 
Indiana Territory. 

The first tavern erected was on lot No. 6, South Pearl street, 
in 1816, by Philip Harter, who kept it for several years. It was 
burned down in 1827. The first church was a log one, and 
was warmed by large fires made of charcoal in sugar kettles. 

The first hewed-log house erected in Pichmond was on 
Charles W. Starr's farm, near a tanyard. 

The first postoflice in Kichmond was established in 1818, 
and Robert Morrisson was commissioned as Postmaster, the 
office being opened in a frame building at the southwest 
corner ofJMain and Front streets. It was next kept in a frame 
building on the northwest corner of Main and Pearl streets. 

The first regular arrivals of mail in 1818 was once every 
two weeks; but as it had to be carried on horseback, and high 
water was frequent and bad roads a drawback, the mail fre- 
quently failed to get in oftener than once a month. The 
yearl}'^ receipts amounted to from $10 to $12, which at this 
time, January, 1884, would not be one day's receipts of 
the ])resent Richmond postofiice. 

About 1820 a two-story brick building was erected on the 
northeast corner of Pearl and Main streets, and was kept as a 
tavern by Jonathan Bayles; and another frame building on 
the southwest corner of Main, kept by Ephraijn Lacey. The 
latter was discontinued in 1828. 

According to an old manuscript in the hands of the late 
Charles F. Coffin, the following families were living in the 
county in 1807-8 — men mostly citizens of Richmond a few 
years later. The number in each family is also given. It 
was published by Dr. Plummer in his history of Richmond: 



NAMES. NO. IN FABULT. 

Jeremiah Cox 10 

Robt. Smith 4 

Elijah Wright 3 

Frederic Hoover 2 

Jacob Foutz 4 

John Smith.. 9 

Benj. Hill 6 

Robt. Hill 4 

Ephraim Overman 9 

Benj. Small 9 

Beale Butler 5 



NAMES. NO. IN FAMILY. 

John Addington 2 

Isaac Commons 1 

Andrew Hoover '7 

Rebecca Cox 1 

Jas. Morrison 1 

John Hawkins, Jr 4 

David Bowles 4 

John Townsend H 

Wm. Harvey 3 

Jesse Bond 6 

John Morrow ' 



18 



HISTORY OF WAYNE COUNTY. 



NAMES. NO. IN FAMILY, 

Ealph Wright , 6 

Jacob Jessup 7 

John Hawkins, Sr 6 

Amos Hawliins 6 

James Townsend 2 

Jos. Comer and mother 3 

Robt. Comer 5 

Stephen Comer 4 

Rachel Pike 1 

Joshua Pickett 6 

Isaac Barber 7 

John Cl^rk 6 

Rice Price 10 

Nathan Peirson 5 

David Bailey, mother and sis- 
ter 3 

Robert Andrews 7 

Benj. Harris 10 

Jane Massey 1 



NAMES. NO. IN FAMILY. 

Benj Cox 1 

Wm. Bond 9 

Jos.Thornburg 5 

John Charles 3 

Israel Elliott 3 

Benj. Morgan 5 

Lewis Hosier 1 

Wm. Hosier 1 

Benjamin Mandlin. 6 

David Bailey, Sr 7 

Sarah Burgess 1 

Jasper Koons 7 

William Hastings .... , 4 

Nathan Overman 1 

Christopher Hill 1 

Thomas Hill 6 

Cornelius Ratliff, Sr 8 

Samuel Charles 

John Pool (1810) 6 



These were amon^ the first settlers of the countv and city, 
and average over six persons to the family. 

Richmond was slowly progressing. Every year served to 
add something to her population and to the solidity of her 
standing as a growing village. Streets had been made, but 
little improved, and the general progress had been in other 
directions. In 1826, a decade after coming into existence, an 
effort was made to improve the streets and in other ways 
sliovv a more progressive spirit on the part of the citizens. 
Where the village streets and sidewalks had all been one and 
cattle roamed freely, sidewalks were attempted, some gutters 
made ; a few even went so far as to plant trees in front of 
their residence lots, horse racks were set back from the street, 
and a general air of progress was manifested. In this respect 
the following editorial from the Public Ledger, in 1827, shows 
that the editor was fully abreast, if not in advance, of the 
times. Certainly his remark would not be out of place at 
this day: 

" Village Improvements. — The streets of our village, though 
considerably improved last year, yet require much labor to 
render them complete. In a number of places, after rain, 
water stands until evaporation carries it off. Tins is not 
only disgusting to the sight, but injurious to the health. Such 
things ought not to be in a village improving as this is. It 
belongs to the appropriate officers to take the lead, and then 
ndividuals no doubt will contribute their exertions. Besides 



CITY OF RICHMOND. ^.Q 

improvement of the streets, there are other subjects worthy 
the attention of the citizens. Siiade trees form so delightful 
a prospect, so much enhance the beauty and interest of a 
place, and are withal so wholesome, that every owner of a 
lot should set them out in front of it. The labor and expense 
would be trifling, 

" Protection against fire is much needed. Built as the 
houses principally are, of wood, a single fire might sweep at 
once the promising village into ruins. All these subjects are 
worthy of attention, and ought to be acted upon." 

It is supposed that these suggestions were acted upon, for 
shade trees were soon found along the streets, and no serious 
fire had for years made the village its victim. 

The Richmond Temperance Society was formed in the 
winter of 1832-'3. It progressed very well the following 
year. E. Grover was its Secretary, and March 30, 1834, Jno. 
D. Vaughan, at the request of the society, delivered a tem- 
perance address which was attended by nearly all the citizens. 
The society did not last many years. Intemperance was not 
a habit among the citizens, though a good deal of liqnor of 
one kind and another was consumed. Common whisky was 
the leading article. 

The Richmond Library was incorporated and establishe 
in 1826. Its collection of books for a year or two was very 
small and a family book-case would have held them all. There 
was no library building, and the books were moved from 
place to place, as the trustees could find a librarian to take 
charge of them. In 1834 the " Young Men's Library" was 
incorporated and the books of the Richmond Library were 
ordered sold by a majority of the shareholders. The reason 
given by some was that they wished to patronize the Young 
Men's Library. This was on June 18, 1834. They were sold, 
but that is the last record found of either of the associations. 

The coldest day Richmond had experienced up to date was 
on Saturday, the 12th of March, 1836. Snow had fallen to 
the depth of eight inches the night before, and on that morn- 
ing the thermometer stood seventeen degrees below zero. 

In the Richmond & Brookfield Canal, which was never fin- 
ished, though $45,000 was expended, Richmond took stock to 



20 HISTORY OF WAYNE COUNTY. 

the amount of $50,000. This was in 1838. The distance 
was thirtj-four miles, A big freshet nearly rained the work 
and it was finally abandoned. This was the only attempt 
ever made to build a canal to Richmond. 

EARLY BUSINESS INTERESTS. 

How Richmond progressed as a business point may be 
gathered from the number of business houses in operation in 
1824. There were then eight dry-goods and grocery store 
or general stores, keeping a little of everything called for in 
the mercantile line; seven blacksmith-shops, four hatters, 
four cabinet-makers, six shoemakers, three tailors, three coop- 
ers, three potteries, one gunsmith, one saddler, one pump- 
maker, one bake shop and a steam distillery, besides carpenters, 
stone-masons, plasterers, etc. The Pahlic Ledger, which 
gave this list, wound up with the statement "that of profes- 
sional men there were but two physicians, and of lawyers we 
have NOT one! " 

To give these more in detail would perhaps be best, thus 
showing who it was that conducted the usiness interests of 
Richmond in its infancy. As the village became known, new 
arrivals came and located, many of them entering into some 
kind of mercantile business, thus causing those who had laid 
the foundation of a future city to divide the trade of the vil- 
lage with them. Among the first to arrive was Edward L. 
Frost, from Long Island, N. Y., with whom John Smith was 
for a short time associated in trade. He was the first merchant 
in town after Robert Morrisson, and afterward traded alone 
on Front street, south of Main, and removed to the southeast 
corner of Main and Pearl streets. Philemon H. Cross was a 
clerk for his brother Edward, and subsequently became a 
partner. 

John Suffrins, a native of Virginia, came to Richmond and 
commenced business in August, 1818, on the east side o 
North Front street, near Main, and soon after bought the 
Thomas and Justice building, on the northeast corner of Main 
and Front streets. James McGruire, after Suffrins, traded a 
short time at the latter place. Atticus Siddall, who had 
taught school in the village, succeeded Frost at Ham's cor- 



CITY OF RICHMOND. 21 

ner. He was for some time alone, afterward with Dr. Cook. 
About the year 1822 John Wright, a native of Maryland, com- 
menced business on Main street, between Front and Pearl 
streets, where he remained a few years. He sold his business 
to his son-in-law, Basil Brightwell, who also built a flourino- 
mill on the site of Jackson, Swayne & Dunn's woolen mill 
below the national bridge. He afterward became embar- 
rassed, and fearing bankruptcy, committed suicide. 

Joseph P. Plummer, from Baltimore, came to Eichmond in 
1823, and commenced business on South Front street, from 
whence he removed to his new frame store, corner of Main 
and South Front, since known as Plummer's corner. 

Joseph P. Strattan, a native of Virginia, came here in 1824 
or 1825; was first a clerk for Edward L. Frost, and afterward 
for Robert Morrisson. Strattan, then in partnership with 
Morrisson, commenced trade at the corner first occupied by 
Morrisson, a building having been removed to that place — 
firm, J. P. Strattan & Co. Strattan having formed a partner- 
ship with Daniel Reid,a clerk of Morrisson (firm, Strattan & 
Reid), Morrisson sold them his remaining stock of goods, and 
retired finally from the mercantile business. After about 
three years Strattan bought out Reid, and a year or two after 
sold out to his brother, Benjamin Strattan, and bought a farm 
four miles north of town about the year 1833. 

David Hollo way, who had removed in 1813 from Waynes- 
ville, Ohio, to Cincinnati, came in 1823 to Wajme Township, 
and bought the homestead of Judge Peter Fleming, near the 
State line, and, in 1825, removed to Richmond, and com- 
menced business on the northeast corner of Main and Front 
streets. After a few years of successful business he retired, 
and was succeeded by William Hill, son of Robert Hill, an 
early settler. 

Jeremy Mansur, an early settler, and lor several years a 
skillful edged-tool maker at Salisbury, and for many years a 
farmer about 'three miles west from Richmond, commenced 
the mercantile business in the city in 1831, on the southwest 
corner of Main and Pearl streets, known as Plummer's cor- 
ner, and continued the business about eight years. 

Edmund Evans, of English birth, who came from Balti- 



22 HISTORY OF WAYNE COUNTY. 

more with a grown-up family about the year 1831, and bought 
a farm a short distance southeast from town, started, some 
years after, a wholesale and retail leather store, to which he 
finally added dry-goods. His store was on Plummer's cor- 
ner, and had been previously occupied by Jeremy Mansiir. 

Isaac Gra}^, from Virginia, came to Richmond in the fall of 
1827, and was in the mercantile business about two years. 
His store was on the ground now occupied by T. J. Bargis's 
stove store, on Main street, north side, between Pearl and 
Front streets. 

Oren Huntington, from Massachusetts, came to 'Richmond 
in September, 1831, and went the next year to Anderson. 
He returned in 1838, engaged the next year as clerk for Sam- 
uel Fleming, a son of Judge Peter Fleming, and in 1840, in 
company with Nathan Wilson, bought Fleming's stock in 
trade, which a year or two afterward they sold to Cook and 
Siddall. In or about the year 1844 ho resumed trade, and in 
1845 sold his goods to Joseph P. Strattan for a farm a 
few miles north of Richmond. After a few years of farming, 
exchanged his farm with Benj. Fulghura for his brick 
house, corner of Main and Franklin streets, which had been 
fitted up for a public house. He soon remodeled the house, 
and established a first-class hotel, known as the Huntington 
House. 

Benjamin Strattan came when a youth and served several 
years as clerk for J. P. Strattan & Co., and afterward for Strat- 
tan & Reid. Afterward he bought the goods of his brother, 
Joseph P., then sole proprietor, and subsequently the build- 
ing of Morrisson. He continued business, alone and in part- 
nership, many years. 

Joseph W. Gilbert, from Pennsylvania, came to Richmond 
in 1835, and commenced the mercantile business on Main 
street, between Marion and Peai'l, and discontinued the busi- 
ness in or about 1852. In 1855 he built the brick block on 
what is known as Gilbert's corner. During a part of the time he 
was in trade, he also kept a public house. He was also for 
twenty-eight years a mail-contractor and large stage proprie- 
tor, having lines running to Dayton, Indianapolis, Wabash 
and other places. 



CITY OF RICHMOND. 



23 



As early as 1825 Warner & Morrisson (Dr. Warner and 
Robert Morrisson) advertised ''drugs and medicines, oils, 
paints, dve-stuffs, patent medicines, etc." The first' store 
confined to a separate branch of trade, and comprising a con- 
siderable stock of goods, was a drug store, established by Ir- 
vin Eeid, in 1833, embracing, besides drugs and medicines 
those articles usually accompanying, as paints, oils, dye-stuffs', 
etc., and an assortment of baoks and stationery. After a few 
years he dropped the book business and continued the druo- 
business until 1852. In 1859 he engaged in the hardware 
trade, which is still continued under the firm of Irvin Eeid & 
Son. 

In 1836 or 1837 Jesse Stanley establisiied a bookstore 
which he continued but a short time. After Stanley, Will- 
iam R. Smith and Swain kept a bookstore. Benjamin Dug- 
dale established a bookstore, which was continued bv him Jbr 
many years until his death, and by his sons for some years 
after. 

The first independent grocery store, saj^s Dr. Plummer, was 
commenced in 1838, by Haines & Farquhar. In 1846 Ben- 
ton & Fletcher established a hardware store. They dissolved 
partnership and divided the stock, Benton continuing at the 
stand of the firm, now Citizens' Bank corner, and Fletcher 
removing to the west side of Main street, between Pearl and 
Marion. 

Philip Harter, the first tavern keeper, had a sign swinging 
near a log building on lot 6, South Peari street. Another 
early tavern was kept at the northeast corner of Main and 
Pearl, sign of a "green tree," by Jonathan Bayles, and an- 
other, of later date, on Front street, near the southwest cor- 
ner of Main, by Ephraim Lacey. Harter soon afterward 
kept a tavern at the corner of North Pearl and Main, where 
the Citizens' Bank now stands. Another tavern was kept 
on Gilbert's, corner northwest corner of Main and Marion 
first by Abraham Jeffries, afterward by several different 
persons. 

Richard Cheeseman was an early settler; lived on South 
Front street; kept a tavern several years. John Baldwin, an 
original Carolinian, early kept a tavern and store at the Citi- 



24 HISTORY OF WAYNE COUNTY. 

zens' Bank corner. Next to Baldwin, Wm. H. Yaughan occu- 
pied the stand for several years, and the tavern was discontin- 
ued. Yaughan had previously kept for a time the Lacey stand on 
Front street. Patrick Justice early kept a tavern on North 
Front street, near Main, for several years. He afterward 
kept a public house which he built in 1827, near the extreme 
limits of the town, now the'southeast corner of Main and Fifth 
streets. 

Benj. Faige, a New Englander, father of Ralph Paige, 
later a merchant on Main street, kept a tavern previous 'to 
1830, at the corner originally owned by John C. Kibbey, an 
early inn-keeper, and known as Meek's corner, northeast cor- 
ner of Main and Marion. 

John Smith started a liquor store in 1825. John Hunt is 
said to have been tke first blacksmith in Richmond. He built 
a shop on South Front street, east side, in 1816. Lewis Burk 
cut in one day the logs for the building, including the ribs 
and weight poles, on Smith's land, about two squares east, for 
75 cents, the job being considered about three days' work. 
John McLane was probably the next blacksmith (some think 
the first) in the town. He and his son John and Isaac Jack- 
son were the principal smiths until after 1820. He was a 
member of the first Board of Trustees of the town, elected 
in 1818. 

Archibald Wasson, an early settler near Ohio line, re- 
moved to town, in 1829, and carried^on the blacksmithing 
business for many years. Jehiel, a son of his, came in 1831, 
and worked at the same business several years, on Main street, 
east side of the town. John H. Thomas came from Delaware 
with a young family and has worked at blacksmithing. George 
McCullough, about the same time, from the same place, car- 
ried on the business many years, on Franklin street, near 
Main; afterward became a partner in the firm of Horney & 
Co., in the manufacture of plows, near the railroad depot. 
He was for several years foreman in the iron department. 

David Maulsby, from Maryland, about 1830, purchased 
on Pearl and Spring streets. He carried on his trade, of 
blacksmith, successfully for a number of years, and retired, 
leaving the business in the hands of his only son, John L. 
Maulsby. 



CITY OF EICBMOND. 



25 



Mordecai Parry, a brother of William, was for many years 
a blacksmith in Richmond. 

The first carpenters in Eichmond are supposed to have 
been Stephen Thomas and his partner, Wm. Justice, who 
were followed, within a few years, by Peter Johnson, Joshua 
and Benjamin Albertson, Evan Chapin, Mark Reeves, father 
of Mark E. and James E. Reeves. Thomas Stafford, who 
lived on Middle Fork, built several houses in the town. 
Charles Cartwright came in early, and was an extensive house- 
builder. John Hughes, from Pennsylvania, a carpenter 
worked at his trade in Richmond many years. David Yore 
also from Pennsylvania, a carpenter, worked at his trade 
until his death, in 1866. 

JSTathan Morgan, from New Jersey, was an early cabinet- 
maker, and for many years the principal undertaker in the. 
town and vicinity. David Hook, an early cabinet-maker, 
carried on business a number of years. Jonas Gaar had a 
cabinet-shop at the south end of Front street. He is senior 
partner of the firm of Gaar, Scott & Co., of the Gaar Ma- 
chine Works. 

Abraham Phillips, from Pennsylvania, in 1838, established 
a shop in South Pearl street; afterward removed to west side 
of Main street, a few doors east from the corner of Marion, 
where he soon after (1840) erected the building owned by him, 
and occupied by James Elder, as a bookstore. In 1856 he 
and James M. Starr built the hall nearly opposite. Having 
leased his interest in the hall to Starr, it was called " Starr 
Hall," until January, 1865, when Phillips bought Starr's 
interest, since which it has been known as "Phillip's Hall." 

Among the early mechanics in Richmond was Henry 
Dunham, a tailor, near the junction of Pearl and Front 
streets. He came in 1819. Robert Dilhorn, a tailor, early 
from the East to Cincinnati, where he was "wagoned up" 
by the assistance of the Friends. He pursued his business 
until his decease many years ago. John Lowe came early ; 
worked a long time as a journeyman tailor, and married a 
daughter of Levi Johnson. 

Isaac E. Jones came from Ohio in 1824. He carried on 
the tailoring business several years. He afterward, in cora- 
3 



25 ■ HISTORY OF WAYNE COUNTY. 

pany with Warner M. Leeds, his brother- in-law, built a saw- 
mill and other machinery near where Nixon's paper-mill is- 
He was also the founder, thonpjh on a comparatively small 
scale, of the Spring Foundry, now the " Gaar Machine 

Works." ^ ., ^ 

John H. Hutton was also one of the early tailors. ±ier- 
mon B. Pavne came from Ohio when a youth, and worked at 
tailoring. "Ho afterward studied law, and now practices m 
Eichmo'nd. Abraham Earnest was a tailor and followed his 
trade for many years. He was from Ohio, also. Samuel E. 
Iredell worked successfully at the same business for many 

years. ^ 

Silveismith and watch repairing was carried on by J no. M. 
Laws. He was from Philadelphia. James Ferguson carried 
on the same business, coming from New Paris, Ohio. He 

married here. 

Chas. A. Dickinson, son of Solomon Dickinson, came Irom 
Philadelphia, and carried on the watch and jewelry business 
until the year 1867. His son, Henry. 0. Dickinson, suc- 
ceeded to his father's business. A brother, Robt. B., is also 
in the same business. 

Elijah H. Githen, a native of New Jersey, came to Rich- 
mond in 1833 and carried on the chair-making business for 
fourteen years. He then after a short absence entered the 
grocery trade. His brother, Griffith D. Githen, was also a 
chair-maker, and carried on the business till 1869, when he 
. moved from the city. One other, Elisha Fulton, worked at 
the business a short time, then removed from the town. 

The leading hatter was Eli Brown, who came from North 
Carolina in 1815. He monopolized the trade for several years. 
In 1828 he entered into a general mercantile trade which he 
continued until 1863, when he sold out and removed to a farm, 
and died in 186Y, aged seventy-five years. 

Not long after Mr. Brown, in 1820, came Caleb Shearon, 
from Maryland. He succeeded in accumulating a fine estate 
in the same line of business. His death occurred in 1850. 

John Sufi'rins, as has been already stated, was an early 
merchant, and afterward went into the hat-making business. 
He was still a dealer m hats and caps on Main street, between 
Pearl and Marion, in 1872. He came in 1818. 



CITY OF EICHMOND. 27 

Achilles Williams, from North Carolina, came to Richmond 
in the autumn of 1818, and established himself in business as 
a saddler and harness-maker, the first of that trade in the 
town. He continued the business many years. Nathaniel 
Lewis, between the years 1826 and 1830, occupied as a sad- 
dle shop a long one-story frame building on the southwest 
corner of Main and Marion streets— now Ralph Paige's 
corner. 

John Brady, a young man from Ohio, a saddler by trade, 
carried on business in town, and held the office of Justice of 
the Peace. He removed to Marion, Ind. Wm. L. Brady, 
his brother, came when a youth, about the year 1826, and 
served an apprenticeship with his brother John, and carried 
on, successfully, the saddle, harness, and trunk trade. 

Daniel P. Wiggins, from Long Island, N. Y., came to 
Richmond in 1823. Being a tanner, Morrisson employed 
him to take charge of his tannery, and, a few years after, ad- 
mitted him as a partner. Walter Legg and John Wilcoxen 
worked in the yard. Wiggins and his sons afterward pur- 
chased the tannery built by Smith, and the Morrisson tannery 
•was discontinued. 

In July, 1857, Job Curme and his son Arthur A. com- 
menced a trade in leather and findings, at old No. 11 South 
Pearl street. The next year they commenced the taiming 
business near the Bush Mill, with one vat. In 1860 Job 
Curme sold his interest to Isaac D. Dunn, and the store was 
removed to 47 Main street, and the tannery to its location on 
Washington and Cliff streets. In 1865 Andrew J. Coffman 
and Dewitt C. McWhinney became partners — firm name, 
Curme, Dunn & Co. — and their store was soon after removed 
to its present location. 297 Main street, with John J. Harring- 
ton as partner. 

Among the early shoemakers in Richmond was Patrick 
Justice, elsewhere mentioned as a tavern-keeper. Jonathan 
Moore, quite a young man, from his father's home, two and 
a half miles southeast of town, as early as 1829 set up a shoe- 
shop on the northeast corner of Main and Fifth streets, where 
the Tremont House now stands, then at the extreme border 
of the town. He continued in business without interruption 
for more than forty years. 



23 HISTORY OF WAYNE COUNTY. 

Owen Ed^erton, early from Carolina, worked many years 
at shoemaking. In 1866 he retired. Joseph Ogbor.:, also 
an early shoemaker in Richmond, retired after many years, 

and died in 1869. 

One of the early mechanics of Richmond, and probably 
the first waeon-maker, was Adam Boyd, who came abont the 
year of the^ incorporation of the town, 1818. He was also 

Justice of the Peace. ^t i r^ 

At a later date came Anthony Fnlghum, from North Caro- 
lina who had his shop at the northwest corner ot Mam and 
Marion streets, since known as Gilbert's corner. He lived 
but a few years, and the business was contmued by his son 
Beniamin. Benj. Fulghum bought a lot on the southeast cor- 
ner of Main and Franklin streets, now the Huntingdon House 
corner where he built a frame shop and dwelling, and car- 
ried on business extensively, especiaPy carriage making. 

Samuel Lippincott commenced carriag-.-maki"g in 1840, 
corner of Main and Franklin streets. 

Potters were among the early mechanics of Richmond. A 
pottery was built on South Front street, and is said to have 
been occupied by Eleazar Hiatt, Isaac Beeson, Geo. Bell, a 
mulatto, and John Scott. The last died of cholera in 1833. 
Samuel and Edward Foulke, young men, settled early in 
Richmond, and carried on successfully the potter's trade. 
There has been no pottery in Richmond for many years. 

Solomon Dickinson, a tinsmith, from Philadelphia, in 1821, 
settled on Front street, near Ezra Boswell's, where he resided 
until his death. His shop was on Main street, between Ma- 
rion and Pearl. He was also a dealer in stoves. After his 
death the business was continued by Edmund Dickinson, a 
son, near tlie northwest corner of Main and Front streets. 

Andrew Reid, a brother of Daniel Reid, was the first gun- 
smith. 

Charles Newman, from Pennsylvania, early set up a turn- 
ing shop on Franklin street, north of Main, where he contin- 
ued the business, having improved his establishment. 

Matthew Rattray, a native of Scotland, a weaver, came in 
1822, and had a shop on South Front street. 

Lewis Baxter, an early settler, was a bricklayer and stone- 
mason. 





>«^v 





T 



%t'- 



CHAPTER II. 



THE GROWTH OF RICHMOND. 



The Cixr in 1840. — An Old Settler's Hecollections of 
Richmond in JSii. — An Interesting Review. — A Decade 
Later. — The Advance of a Quarter of a Century. — Sta- 
tistics OF Business and Population. — Board of Trade. — 
Business Exchange. — City Officers from 1840 to 1884. — 
The Postoffice. — -Postmasters from 1818 to 1881. — Post- 
office Bi;siNESs. — Free Delivery Established. — Street 
Railroads. — Express Companies. — Gas Works. — The 
Fire Department. — Water Works. 

RICHMOND in 1840. 

On a map of Richmond, Diiblished by William Dewey in 
1840, the following statements amono; others are to be found: 

"The Richmond & Brookville Canal is now under con- 
struction." "The population (of the city) is about 3,000.* 
The town contains two woolen factories, a paper-mill, an oil- 
mill, two foundries and machine shops, two merchant flour- 
ing mills, a last factory, several carriage factories, besides 
numerous other manufacturing establisliments. It has two 
literary and scientific societies, one of which has a laro;e col- 
lection of minerals, shells and other curiosities. A splendid 
Episcopal church is about to be erected, and the Orthodox 
Friends are building in the vicinity of the town a large and 
beautiful seminary. Its schools, both male and female, are 
numerous and well conducted. Its business is extensive, and 
its facilities for trade must shortly be very great. The Rich- 
mond & Brookville Canal is intended to connect with the 
Whitewater Canal at Brookville which will open a water 
communication with Cincinnati. Macadamized roads in vari- 
ous directions are in contemplation." 

* A remarkably liberal estimate. Toe census of 1840 showed a popula- 
tion of only 1,130 ! 

39 



30 HISTOKY OF WAYNE COUNTY. 

A GROUPING OF INTERESTING FACTS.* 

On the 9th da}'^ of December, 1847 (now thirty-six years 
ago), the writer first set foot within the precincts of this fair 
city and here he has ever since remained. It was then a mere 
village of some 2,500 inhabitants, acknowledging John Say- 
lor as its chief executive and head. Elected first in 1840, he 
continued in office until 1852, when he was succeeded by the 
late John Fin ley, Esq. 

At that somewhat distant period the Friends, or Qua- 
kers, as they were commonly called, exercised a very marked 
influence over the society about them; their numbers being 
much greater then than now in proportion to the population. 
They were a thrifty, honest, intelligent people, possessed of 
many virtues, while their wives and daughters were the peers 
of any in the land. 

As a people, however, they were rather non-progressive 
and lacking in that spirit of worldly enterprise so remarkably 
manifest at the present day. They were, however, tenacious 
of their religious ideas, and rigid in regard to its teachings 
and observances. To one not of their faith and unaccustomed 
to their mode of thought or manner of life, there seems to be 
an ever-present feeling of restraint and repression — a sort of 
mental and physical embargo — by no means congenial to the 
youthful brawn and brain. Mirthfulness was rarely encour- 
aged, and if indulged in, was quiet and subdued; while dem- 
onstrations of gayety were rare and guarded. Speech was 
as silver, but silence was golden. The brilliant hues of beau- 
tiful flowers and the happy gleeful songs of birds seemed in- 
appropriate to their surroundings. 

Music and singing were but little understood or cultivated 
by the people of the time, and by members of their society 
in no degree whatever. Such practices were regarded as sin- 
ful, and as unbecoming the dignitj', gravity and soberness 
of that peculiar people. Their speech and attire were alike 
of the plainest kind, and every color worn was in harmony 
with both. Under the shadow of their influence even pastors 
of other denominations discouraged the wearing of gay 

* This article was prepared by Geo. P. Emswiler. 



CITY OF RICHMOND. 31 

colors. Broad-brimmed hats and plain silk bonnets wholly 
unadorned were everywhere to be seen. A bearded face was 
the merest exception to the general rule, and was not unfre- 
qnently the subject of comment and criticism, while the un- 
fortunate mustache was held in still greater disfavor, as the 
wearer was supposed to be of that class whose ways are dark 
and whose deeds are evil. 

The good people of the village were generally distinguished 
for simplicity of habits and manners. But little effort was 
made in the direction of personal adornment or display. 
We distinctly remember that eight yards of material consti- 
tuted a pattern for a lady's dress, and sometimes even less 
would serve. But times have changed, both larger views 
and ampler garments now hold sway. We remember also 
that the female head-gear did not then consist of those inde- 
scrible nondescripts now so fearfully and wonderfully formed, 
but simply and in fact, a hat or bonnet severely plain. 

The folly and extravagance of display and dress came by 
degrees and were the results of increased wealth, the war and 
foreign innovation. 

At that day good boarding could be had for $1.50 a week, 
and the hire of a horse and buggy was but $1.25 a day. 

We had neither railroads nor turnpikes (excepting the turn- 
pike to Boston) while gas-light, telegraphs and telephones 
were as yet of the things to come. But a "coach and 
four " used to carry the mail for " Uncle Sam " and the few 
unlucky passengers whose business, or necessity, required 
them to be abroad in the land. 

Cattle, hogs and sheep were then driven by thousands, in 
great droves along the national road on their way to some 
Eastern market. The surplus products of the country com- 
manded but a nominal sum. Hauling by wagon was too ex- 
pensive and our present facilities for transportation were not 
yet in existence. At that time all the business of the village 
was contracted on threesquares of Main street, lying between 
Front (on which the court-house now stands) and Franklin, 
which is now known as Seventh street, that between Front 
and Pearl streets (now Fourth and Fifth) doing much the 
greater part. 



32 HISTOKl OF WAYNE COUNTY, 

No mercantile business whatever was done any where oft 
Main street. A shabby old market-house stood in the middle 
of South Pearl street, about 150 yards from Main. On the 
present site of Roed and Tanneman's business block — corner 
of Noble and Fifth streets — and nearly opposite the west end 
of the passenger depot was located Kenworthy's tannery, 
the only structure in that vicinity. 

Where the passenger depot now stands with its immediate 
surroundings was an enclosed Jield, and on the west front of 
it was the " Quaker walk " leading to Friends' Orthodox Meet- 
ing House, a large plain, two-story brick structure erected in 
1823. The " walk " referred to was partly planked and 
separated from the main road by a row of posts. The writer 
distinctly remembers seeing a horse and buggy, with two oc- 
cupants, stick fast in ►the mud in front of where now stands 
the Avenue House, immediately north of the railroad crossing. 
The brick business block now occupying the east side of 
Fort Wayne avenue and covering a full square in length and 
forming something of a triangle, stands upon " made ground. " 
formerly a stagnant pool whence came in spring time the 
doleful music of the frog. 

This was then the property of Charles W. Starr, by whom it 
is said to have been oifsred tor sale for a few hundred dollars 
without finding a purchaser. On one occasion the writer 
remembers this pool furnished water to extinguish a neigh- 
boring fire. The old Starr House, subsequently known as 
the " Meredith " and '• Tremont" corner of old Fifth (now 
Eighth) and Main, was considered "away out of town. " 
Even the Huntington House was thought to be inconven- 
iently far from business. An old " mile stone" used to stand 
on the north side of Main street, between old Seventh and 
Eighth, marked " one-half mile to Richmond." Beyond Frank- 
lin street (now Seventh) there were but few buildings, and 
Sixth street (now Ninth) had as 3'et no existence. Alleast 
was either orchard, open field or wood. Basil Briglitwell, 
Benjamin Strattan. Thaddeus Wright, Jesse Meek, John 
Haines, William Blanchard, John M. Laws, Wm. S. Wa t, 
Wm. Petcliell and Ralph A. Paige were our dry-goods 
dealers, not one of whom is in the busine ss at the present day 



CITY OF RICHMOND, 33 

and only four of the ten survive, to-wit: Wright, "Watt 
Paige and Strattan. Their companions have all gone hence, 
where barter and exchange are unknown and the weary are at 
rest. Although not in business here at the time referred to, 
Daniel B. Crawford was nevertheless a citizen of this vicinity 
for years before and since 1850, and has been a leading and 
prosperous dry-goods merchant. He has also been identi- 
fied with various other interests of the city and county, both 
secular and religious, until his name has become as familiar as 
household words. 

Messrs. Fletcher & Benton first sold hardware on the south- 
east corner of old Front and Main streets, afterward known 
as " Hestor's Corner," immediately east of the court-house. 
Subsequently, Thomas Benton alone engaged in the business, 
in an old brick building, where the Richmond National Bank 
now stands. 

A single member of the old Wiggin's firm (Charles O.), 
with some added juniors, continues to hold forth at the old 
stand as in the dajs of yore. 

William L. Brady was also a pioneer, and was successfully 
engaged in the harness trade. Samuel and William Lynde 
will be remembered as among our principal grocers. Neither 
must we omit Elijah Givens in the same branch of trade. The 
former long did business where George W. Barnes for so 
many years dispensed his excellent family supplies, and where 
Joseph A. Knabe tiow caters to the public wants. The drug 
business was in the hands of Messrs. George Doxey, Irwin 
Reed and Dr. Joseph Howels, the former of whom died here 
during the prevalence of the cholera in 1819, and the latter 
is now engaged in the practice of medicine in this city; 
while Mr. Reed has for many years past been a dealer in 
hardware, on the southwest corner of Main and Franklin 
streets. To him has been vouchsafed the most extensive 
business career, in point of time, accorded any member of 
this community, crowned, too, with ample success. These 
gentlemen were succeeded by Drs. James R. Mendenhall, John 
T. Plummer and Lewis H. McCullough, each of whom con- 
tinued in the business some years. 

Hon. David P. Holloway, for many years past a resident 



34 HISTORY OF WAYNE COUNTY. 

of Washington City, and lately deceased, was in the book 
trade at the time of tny advent into the village, and was 
located in an old frame building on the south side of West 
Main street, near the corner of Front — now Fourth street. 
Dr. J. R. Mendenhall soon afterward became his successor 
and our former city Civil Engineer. Hon. Oliver Butler was 
his business manager for years. The writer first greeted the 
public here in the capacity of salesman for Strattan & Wriglit, 
whom he faithfully served for tive long years, for the meager 
salary of $15 per month and board, saving therefrom, by the 
strictest economy, his first $500, a result utterly out of the 
question in these times of increased values and multiplied 
temptations, from no greater pay. It was my good fortune 
to find a home in the family of '• Uncle " James and "Grand- 
mother " Hunnicutt, who kept the only boarding-house of 
the time, which was quite liberally patronized, as v^^ell it 
might be when we remember that they charged but $1.25 per 
week for board. Their house was headquarters for many old- 
time "Friends " during " yearly meetings." They were most 
truly a kind old couple, called hence this many a year. 

Thomas L. Bargis and Isaac L. Dickinson dealt in stoves 
and tinware. William Show and Isaac Paxson, Sr., supplied 
the city with meats. Mark Lewis and William Mason, who 
soon after came to the rescue, furnished bread, cake and 
crackers. John Saffins, the hatter then, and for many years 
after, took care of the cranial department of the multitude, 
and C. A. Dickinson and J. B. Hunnicutt supplied our 
wants, real or imaginary, with jewelrj', watches, etc. The 
former still continues in the trade; the latter has retired from 
the stage of action. J. W. Gilbert, Daniel Sloan and K. 
Brookens catered to the wants of the public as hosts. There 
was but one moneyed institution, known as the " Old Branch 
Bank," Elijah Coffin, Cashier. The building adjoined the 
Richmond National Bank on the east, and was removed a 
few years since to make room for other improvements. 

Our lawyers were Stephen B. Stanton, James Perry and 
William A. Bickle. The former is deceased, but Perry and 

ickle still continue in practice. 

The medical profession was ably represented by Drs. John 



: OF RICHMOyf 



CITY OF RICHMOND. 35 

T. Plummer and William B. Smith, both of whom have loner 
since paid the debt that nature owes. A. D". Newton was 
the only dentist of the time, and was for several years without 
a rival, until William E. Webster located here. The first 
named still continues to serve the public, while the latter has 
passed to that bourne from which no traveler returns. They 
were both good men, and professionally equal to the require- 
ments of the times. 

Milton HoUingsworth is deserving of special mention as 
being one of Richmond's foremost teachers. Earnest, capa- 
ble and efficient, he was beloved and esteemed by his pupils, 
admired and respected by all. He, too, has gone to his 
reward. . 12259:> L 

John K. Boswell was the first daguerrean artist of my 
recollection, here. His work was a credit to his profession, 
and specimens of his in the writer's possession will bear com- 
parison with that of the present day. 

James Elder was Postmaster during 1847-'48, and it is in 
my recollection that he also dealt in books and paper. He re- 
cently informed me that during his administration, single 
letter postage i-anged from 5 to 10 cents, according to dis- 
tance transmitted. Speaking of postal matters reminds me 
that about this time letter envelopes first made their appear- 
ance, and their utility being so manifest, were not long in 
gaining public favor, x^ot so, however, with the equally 
useful steel pen, for, although upon the market for years, 
they were first beginning to win their way to public favor 
and appreciation. N. S. Leeds was the first citizen of Eicli- 
raond to learn the art of telegraphing, which he did at Day- 
ton, Ohio, some time during 1848, for the purpose of serving 
a company who put up a line along the national road in that 
year. Their office was located on the north side of West 
Main street, between Pearl and Marion, in the room now 
owned and occupied by James J. Jordan, as a fancy grocery 
store. L. H. McCullough soon after learned to manipulate 
the instrument, and became the former's successor. For lack 
of patronage or some other cause unknown to the writer, the 
enterprise proved a failure, and the line went down. Mr. 
Leeds has responded to a message from the eternal world, 



\ 

36 HISTok ' OF WAYNE COUNTY. 

while Mr. McCullough still toys with the subtle fluid, in its 
various moods. It may be of interest in this connection to 
state that the latter gentleman was the first person to intro- 
duce coal oil into this city for the purpose of illumination. 
This was in 1858, and the oil so used was distilled from coal 
by some enterprising individual of Covington, Ky. 

It may be said of the amusements of that day, that they 
were neither varied nor numerous, picnics in summer and 
balls and parties in winter constituting about all the diver- 
sions of that period. Lectures, concerts and theatricals were 
not in vogue. The reigning influence seemed to be adverse 
to anything of a happy or joyous nature. The piano had but 
two representatives in the town. And as for sewing machines, 
alas! they were not, unless, indeed, we dare, without irrev- 
erence, apply the term to Eve's fair daughters, those blessed 
eartlily ministers, who are ever ready to repair our garments 
or relieve our woes. 

The press, that mighty engine, had its representatives in 
two weekly journals, the Palladium and Jeffersonian, re- 
spectively Republican and Democratic in politics. The 
former was for many years published by Holloway & Davis. 
The Jeffersonian was presided over by James Elder, Esq. 

In those "good old days" there were no women in the 
profession; none as teachers in the schools. The}' were un- 
known to the editorial chair, nor had they a place at the desk, 
the case or the counter. With rare exceptions they were 
deemed incompetent for places of trust, or responsibility. 
Man's estimate of woman was not credible to his head or 
heart. His bigotry and selfishness were a bar to her advance- 
ment. But thanks to a dawn of a higher intelligence and 
the spread of more liberal views, the day of her deliverance 
has come. The shackles of prejudice and superstition are 
falling about her, and she is free to pursue whatever occupa- 
tion or calling she may choose. A universal culture has taken 
the place of a partial education. A better system of schools, 
the press, and the facilities tor travel and intercourse, owing 
to a growing dispjsition to investigate all subjects, taking 
nothing for granted, have combined to elevate and fit her for 
he active duties of life. She is freer, stronger, more self- 



CITY OF RICHMOND. / 37 

reliant than her sisters of an\' age. May the bondao-e of 
hand or brain be hers no more, while the freedom of thought 
and the freedom of speech continue to be the just inheritance 
of a free and independent people. 

We might very properly supplement these hasty sketches 
by briefly tracing the career of such early settlers as John S. 
Newman, David Hoover, Chas. W. Starr, Eobert Morrissoii, 
Albert C. Blanchard, Elijah Coffin, John Finley and many 
others, whose lives have left their impress upon this com- 
munity, but such an undertaking would transcend the orio-inal 
purpose of the papers, as well as the needful information and 
ability of the writer. We trust, however, that the subject 
may yet receive the consideration it so justly deserves, at the 
hand of some one fully competent to the task. 

At the period of my coming, as before stated, we had no 
railroads, but one turnpike, no telegraph, and no telephones. 
At the present day they radiate in all directions and encircle 
us round about. Then communication with the outer world 
was slow and difficult ; now we have almost unlimited facil- 
ities for transportation and travel, and almost instaiit com- 
munication with the uttermost parts of the earth. Behold! 
what a marvel has been wrought; what wondrous changes in 
the brief space of less than two scores of years. 

A DECADE LATER 1857. 

In 1857 the corporation limits of the city of Richmond ex- 
tended north and south one and a half miles, and east and 
west about three-fourths of a mile. 

At this time there was one public-school building, 71 x 61 
eet in size and forty feet high, of brick, costing $11,000. 

The Starr Hall, erected at a cost of $10,000 by James M. 
Starr, was ninety-five feet long, forty feet wide and three 
stories high. 

A public square, the gift of John Smith, covered one acre 
of ground, fences put in, grass and shade trees planted. 

The city then had three fire engines. 

The gas-works were erected, and the town first suppl ed 
with gas in 1855. 

There were three banks in the city, the Citizens' Bank, 



38 HISTOEY OF WAYNE COUNTY. 

Wayne County, afterward People's Bank, and branch of the 
B ink of the State of Indiana, all north of Main street. 

A thorough system of drainage, grading and paving was 
inaugurated in 1848. 

The first daily mail between New Castle and Richmond 
was started Feb. 1, 1854, by railroad. 

In the vicinity of Richmond in 1857 there were twenty- two 
flouring mills, twenty-four saw-mills, one oil-mill, two paper- 
mills, and a large number of woolen factories. There were 
two large brick boarding schools within a mile or two of the 
city, one west and the other south; several extensive nurs- 
eries; a horticultural establishment; two sash, blind, door and 
flooring mills; a cutlery manufactory; a shoe-peg manufac- 
tory; a soap and candle factory. In addition to this in the 
city of Richmond there were three coal yards, machine shop, 
manufacturing of agricultural implements, six carriage 
manufactories, etc., etc. 
The value of personal property in Richmond, 1857, 

was .$1,152,234 

The value of real estate in Richmond, 1857, was. . 1,528,820 
" " additional improvements in Rich- 
mond, 1857, was 253,440 



$2,934,494 
Of manufactured articles, in value, $906,025. 

ADVANCE OF A QUARTEE OF A CENTUEY. 

Richmond steadily grew and prospered, her most flourish- 
ing period being the decade between 1850 and 1860, when it 
gained over 5,000 in population. Its slowest growth was 
between 1830 and 1850. The civil war was no detriment to 
her advancement. While the county suffered severely, owing 
to the large force placed in the field, Richmond, being a 
center for military purposes, was sustained in her growth, 
that growth being nearly fifty per cent, for the decade between 
1860 and 1870. Not only was this period of a quarter of a 
century one of advancement in point of population, but its 
material interests developed in a ratio equally as great. The 
city expanded its limits, and its growth was of a solid and 



CITY OF KICHMOND. 



39 



endurable kind. Kailroads were bnilt, gravel roads and turn- 
pikes made, and the cultivation of soil increased by a thor- 
ough farming population. Tlaese all combined to make 
Richmond's advancement one of substantial prosperit3\ 

In the ''Board of Trade Review," the following exhaustive 
statistics of her business interests can be read with pleasure 
as well as profit : 

VOLUME OF BUSINESS FOR 1874 

THE NAMES AND NUMBERS OF MERCANTILE ESTABLISHMENTS IN 
1874, CAPITAL INVESTED, AND GROSS VALUE OF SALES. 



NAME OP BUSINESS. 



Agricultural implements 

Auction and commission 

Boots and shoes 

Books and stationery 

Butter and eggs 

Clothing 

Confectionery 

Drugs and medicines 

Dry-goods 

Fancy goods 

Flour and feed 

Fruits and vegetables 

Furniture 

Groceries, wholesale 

" retail 

Grain and seeds 

Hats, caps, and furnishing goods. 

Horses 

Hardware 

Iron and bent wood-work 

Lumber 

Millinery 

Manufacturers' supplies 

Notions 

Pumps 

Stoves and tinware 

Sewing machines 

Seeds and flowers. ... 

Watches and jewelry 

Wool 

Wood and coal 



Total 190 1351,060 



CAPITAL INV'D. 



$7,000 
' 19,000 



5,000 
7,500 
5,000 
12,000 
48,500 
3,000 



9,000 
40,000 
55,9(i0 
10,000 

8 000 



25,000 
8,000 

11,000 
7,500 



19,500 
3,200 

30,000 
1,000 
2,500 
7,500 



5.900 



$11,000 

2,400 
73,150 
26,500 
11,000 
51,100 

2,500 

58,500 

96,000 

17,200 

400 

1,400 
36,000 
223,350 
83,740 
11,0C0 
15,500 
20,000 
45,500 

9,000 
59,000 
17,000 
10,000 
47,900 

6,159 
61,200 

2,500 

800 

29,200 

50,000 

15,300 



$1,094,299 



Gross sales $3,970,358 



40 



HISTORY OF WAYNE COUNTY, 



THE NAMES AND NUMBERS OF MANUFACTDRING ESTABLISHMENTS 
CAPITAL INVESTED AND GROSS AMOUNT OF SALES FOR 18Y4. 



Book and newspaper publishing, blank books, elc. . 

Boots and shoes 

Breweries 

Bread, crackers, and bakery products 

Bricks 

Candy and confections 

Carriages and buggies. . 

Cigars 

Clothing 

Caskets and burial cases 

Churches and school furniture 

Cooperage 

Crcquet sets and wood turning 

Furniture 

Galvanized iron work 

Lime 



Leather, harness 

Saddlery, horse collars 

Hames and shoe findings 

Malleable iron and miscellaneous machinery 

Mill machinery 

Marble- work and stone cutting 

Plows 

Potteries 

Stockings 

Soap, candles, and oil 

Threshing machines, engines, saw-mills, etc 

Wagons, cartp, etc 

Woolen goods 

Wooden ware "| 

Chairbacks j 

Files ; 



Glue 

Hoop-skiits. 
Hair goods. 



J 



Total 127 $520,80011,286,985 



CAPITAL EMP'D. 



$19,000 

17,000 

21,000 

7,500 

5,000 

37,300 

3,000 

7,500 

104,800 

50,000 

4,400 

3,500 

9,000 



12,000 

19,000 

20,000 
16,700 

2,300 
25,000 

4,000 



3,000 

102,000 

4,800 

23,000 



1,000 



$24,800 
73.150 

2,300 
27,650 
20,000 

2,500 
21,000 
33,703 
51,100 
122,700 
40,000 

6,900 

7,000 
36,000 



8,000 

178,000 

41,000 
46,500 
15,500 
40,000 

5,332 
10,000 

1,G00 
458,200 

2,800 

7,000 



4,950 



Gross Sales $2,729,346 



CITY OF RICHMOND. 



41 



NUMBER OF ESTABLISHMENTS CLASSIFIED AS INDUSTRIES, CAP- 
ITAL INVESTED, GROSS RECEIPTS DURING THE YEAR 1874. 



NAME OF BUSINESS. 



Artists 

Cleaning and renovating... 

Carpet weaving 

Barber shops 

Butter and egg packing 

Butchering 

Blacksmilhing 

Dentists 

Grreenhouses and nurseries. 

Gunsmithing 

Ham curing and packing. . . 

Horse dealers 

Livery— 63 horses 

Iron fence 

Ice 



Pork packing 

Photography 

Silver plating 

Pumps, plumbing, & steam & gas pipe fitting. 



Total 



CAPITAL INV'D. 




1^ 
< 


hJ 


iz; 


< 


o 


H 


to 


M 


(6 




H 




Ph 




$3,000 


$866 


875 




100 




1,900 


5,o66 


11,000 


10,00o 


30,700 


9,800 


7,100 


1,000 


4,650 


18,000 


15,000 


800 


3,700 


22,000 


44,000 




20,000 


38,250 


40,700 


3,000 


3,000 


10,000 


4,000 


75,000 


150,000 




7,000 


2,66o 


150 


3,200 


10,159 



58 $98,850 



f357,234 



Gross business $1,292,099 



THE AGGREGATE OF ALL CLASSES OF BUSINESS DONE 
MOND IN 1874. 



IN RICH- 





Si 

p 
o 

w 
S 
& 

2i 
? 


CAPITAL INVESTED. 


RAW MATERIAL 
USED. 


p 

o 

> 


on 

s 

a 

p 


> 
w 

> 

p 




CLASS. 


> 


PERSONAL. 


$303,465 


$492,319 


GROSS SALES. 


ManufactureB... 


127 
190 

58 

375 


$5^0,800 
351,060 
198,850 


$1,286,985 

1,094, -^99 

357,234 


1,507 
613 
328 


$6.54,459 

178,832 
78,470 


$2,729,346 
3,970,353 








1,292,099 










Total 


$1,070,710 


$2,738,518 


$303,465 


$492,319 


2,448 


$911,761 


$7,991,803 



42 HISTORY OF WAYNE COUNTY. 

BOARD OF TRADE. 

The Board of Trade was organized in 1869, and was an 
active agent in developing and giving publicity to the manu- 
facturing and other business interests of the city, necessary 
to tlie public welfare, and which could hardly have been oth- 
erwise accomplished. It was suffered to lapse, but again 
recovered in 1874. The business of that year the board de- 
termined to report, and one of the most complete statistical 
works ever issued was the result of their labor. Why such 
an institution was allowed to die, or go out of existence, is 
hard to explain, and certainly was not creditable to the busi- 
ness men of the city. A better advertising medium for the 
trade of Richmond was never issued, or the reputation of the 
business men of the city for energy and progress! veness never 
better held up and exemplified. 

BUSINESS men's EXCHANGE. 

After this so successful, though, as it proved, spasmodic 
effort, the association was again allowed to lapse, and in 1880 
an effort was made to form an association under the above 
name, which was accomplished Dec. 31, 1880. J. W. Grubbs 
was elected President, Jos. G. Lemon, Yice-President, and A. 
E. Crocker, Secretary and Treasurer. The Directors were: 
W. C. Starr, C. B. Hunt, T. W. Haynes and W. I. Dulin, 
all of whom, including the othcers, still hold their positions. 

It may be said that this organization is a successor of the 
Board of Trade, but what it has done to give the business in- 
terests of Richmond any name beyond its local limits is at 
present hard to say. It appears to be simply a board of ar- 
bitration among the business men, but has nothing of the 
character of a Board of Trade, with its annual report or 
"Trade Review." It would be of great importance, if this 
association should make an annual report as one of its features, 
and scatter a few thousand copies in the outside world. This 
would be like casting bread upon the waters, and it is doubt- 
ful if many days would elapse ere the return could be both 
seen and felt. Such an effort is worthy of the business talent 
of the city. 



CITY OF RICHMOND. 43 

POPULATION OF RICHMOND. 

In 1816, estimated Y5 

In 1818, estimated 2qq 

In 1820, estimated , ^ ^ 32() 

In 1824, census taken , 453 

In 1826, census taken ....,,.., 543 

In 1828, census taken §24 

In 1830, census taken 973 

In 1840, census taken 1 I30 

In 1 850, census taken , 1 44.3 

In 1860, census taken . . , 6 603 

In 1870, census taken 9 445 

In 1880, census taken 12,742 

In 1884, Jan. 1, estimated 16,000 

To the above population as given may be added that taken 
by the city in 1874, to which was added the per cent, of gain 
of the preceding four years, and then the number published as 
the census of 1875. This gives full information as its head- 
ing indicates. 

POPULATION OF RICHMOND IN 1875, Bf WARDS, BY SEX, BY COLOR, 
BY NATIVITY, AND BY AGE. 

City population, 11,579; contiguous suburbs, 1,623. Total 
population, 13,202. 

First Ward, 2,050; second, 2,046; third, 1,255; fourth, 
4,044; fifth, 2,184. Total 11,579. 

Males, 5,651; females, 5,928. Total 11,579. 

White, 10,985; colored, 594. Total 11,579. 

American, 6,867; German, 1,581; German-American,* 
2,172; Irish, 422; Irish- American,* 448; miscellaneous, 89. 
Total 11,579. 

CITY OFFICIALS. 

As is elsewhere stated, Kichraond was incorporated as a 
village in 1818; as a borough in 1834; and as a city in 1840. 
A complete list of city officers from 1840 to 1884 is given 
below. 

*Born in the United States, but both parents born aliens. 



44 HISTORY OF WAYNE COUNTY 

1840 — At the election on May 4, 1840, the following were 
elected: Mayor, John Sailor; Councilraen, Bazel Brightwell, li. 
HoUingsworth, William Parry, Nathan Morgan; Treasurer, 
John Haines; Marshal, Jesse Meek; Clerk, D. P. Holloway; 
Assessor, Eli Brown. The judges of the above election were 
Atticus Siddall and Achilles Williams. 

1841 — Mayor, John Sailor; Councilmen, B. Brightwell, 
B. Strattan, William Cox, H. HoUingsworth, J. H. Hutton, 
William Parry, H. D. Higgins, Job Borton ; Marshal, P. 
McFarlin; Assessor, Eli Brown; Treasurer, John Haines; 
Clerk, D. P. Holloway. 

1842 — Miyor, John Sailor; Councilmen, James M. Poe, 
Jesse Meek, William Cox, W. L. Brady, W. W. Lynde, 
John A. McMlnn, David Morrison, James King; Marshal, 
William Hart; Assessor, Levi Kerms; Treasurer, Elijah 
Coffin; Clerk, D. P. Holloway. 

1843 — Mayor, John Sailor; Councilmen, James M. Poe, 
William Meek, William Brady, William Blanchard, John A. 
McMinn, William W. Lynde, Daniel Morrison, James 
King; Marshal, Charles O'Harra; Assessor, Eli Brown; 
Treasurer, John Suffrins; Clerk, D. P. Holloway; Collector, 
Edward Stokes. 

1844 — Mayor, John Sailor; Councilmen, Cornelius Yan- 
sant, Ellis Nordyke, Thomas Deyarmon, Cornelius Cook, 
Joseph W. Gilbert, Andrew F. Scott, Jonathan Mattis, Job 
Borton; Marshal, Charles O'Harra; Assessor, Edward 
Stokes; Treasurer, John Suffrins; Clerk, W. W. Lynde; Col- 
lector, Samuel Sinix. 

1845 — Mayor, John Sailor; Councilmen, Eli Brown, Benj. 
Strattan, Samuel Pierce, C. G. Cook, J. W. Gilbert, J. H. 
Hutton, A. F. Scott, Nathan Morgan; Treasurer, John Suf- 
frins; Assessor, Joshua Harvey; Collector, Samuel Sinix; 
Marshal, Charles O'Harra; Clerk, W. W. Lynde. 

1846 — Mayor, John Sailor; Councilmen, S. R. Wiggins, 
Jesse Meek, W. L. Brady, Richard Estell, James Perry, Jos. 
W. Gilbert, A. F. Scott, Sidney Smith; Treasurer, John 
Suffrins; Assessor, W. S. Addleman; Collector, Richard 
Burk; Marshal, Charles O'Harra; Clerk, Wm. A. Bickle. 

1847 — Mayor, John Sailor; Councilmen, Benj. Strattan, 



CITY OF RICHMOND. 45 

Ellis Nordyke, Lavinus King, Stacy Wilkins, Wm. D. Wil- 
son, Ezra Smith, H. B. Payne, J. J. Conley; Marshal, 
Charles O'Harra; Assessor, Eli Brown; Collector, W. S. 
Addleman; Treasurer, E. Coffin; Clerk, W. A. Bickle. 

1848— Mayor, John Sailor; Councilmen, John Peterson, 
Wm. Meek, J. H. Button, C. B. Huft, A. F. Scott, S. F. 
Fletclier, J. J. Conley, Jos. Howells; Marshal, Charles 
O'Harra; Assessor, W. S. Addleman; Collector, Samuel 
Pierce; Treasurer, John Saifrins; Clerk, B. W. Davis. 

1849 — Mayor, John Sailor; Councilmen, S. F. Fletcher, 
John Peterson, J. H. Hutton, C. B. Huff, A. F. Scott, W. 
W. Lynde, J. J. Conley, Thos. Mason; Marshal, Jacob 
Keefer; Assessor, Samuel Pierce; Collector, H. B. Payne; 
Treasurer, John Suffrins; Clerk, B. W. Davis. 

1850 — Mayor, John Sailor; Councilmen, S. F. Fletcher, 
John Peterson, C. B. Huff, J. Malsby, A. F. Scott, Peter 
Crocker, John Finley, Thomas Mason; Assessor, Samuel 
Pierce; Collector, H. B. Payne; Treasurer, John Suffrins; 
Marshal, Charles O'Harra; Clerk, B. W. Davis. 

1851 — Mayor, John Sailor; Councilmen, John Finley, 
Thomas Benton, J. H. Hutton, C. B. Huff, Sol. Beard, 
Lewis Burk, Thomas Mason, Wm. Shearon; Assessor, Sam- 
uel Pierce; Collector, H. B. Payne; Treasurer, John Suf- 
frins; Marshal, Jos. McCoy; Clerk, B. W. Davis. 

1852— Mayor, John Finley; Councilmen, C. F. Coffin, S. 
R. Wiggins, J. M. Gaar, O. P. Peters, Lewis Burk, J. W. 
Gilbert, Wm. Shearon, Jas. M. King; Assessor, Samuel 
Pierce; Collector, H. B. Payne; Treasurer, John Suffrins; 
Marshal, L. D. Miller; Clerk, B. W. Davis. 

1853— Mayor, John Finley; Coucilmen, C. F. Coffin, S. R. 
Wiggins, C." B. Huff, D. P. Graves, Lewis Burk, W. G. 
Scott, J. J. Conley, Job Borton; Assessor, W. S. Addleman; 
Collector, C. R. Williams; Treasurer, John Suffrins; Mar- 
shal, Jos. McCoy; Clerk, B. W. Davis. 

1854— Mayor, John Finley; Councilmen, C. F. Coffin, S. 
R. Wiggins, C. B. Huff, S. W. Lynde, W. G. Scott, Lewis 
Burk, Jason Ham, T. K Young; Assessor, D. P. Graves; 
Collector, Samuel Edmondson; Treasurer, John Suffrins; 
Marshal, Jos. McCoy; Clerk, B. W. Davis. 



46 HISTOKY OF WAYNE COUNTY. 

1855 — Mayor, John Finley; Councilmen, J. R. Menden- 
hall, Thos. Roberts, S. W. Lynde, J. H. Hutton. Lewis Burk, 
J. M. Starr, W. T. Dennis, J. M. Smitli; xissessor, C. B. 
Huff; Collector, W. P. Benton; Treasurer, John Siiffrins; 
Marshal, J. McCoy; Clerk, B. W. Davis. 

1856 — Mayor, John Finley; Councihnen, S. R. Wiggins, 
J. M. Poe, H. B. Payne, J. M. Gaar, Lewis Bark, J. H. Hut- 
ton, J. B. Strawbridge, J. M. Smith; Assessor, S. W. Lynde; 
Collector, C. B. Huff; Treasurer, John Suffrins; Marshal, 
W. Zimmerman; Clerk, B. W. Davis. 

1857 — Mayor, John Finley; Councilmen, J. M. Poe, S. R. 
Wiggins, C. B. Huff, A. Gaar, J. H. Thomas, John Wiggins, 
J. J. Conley, Jas. M.King; Assessor, W. S. Addleman; Col- 
lector, S. Edmondson; Treasurer, John Suffrins; Marshal, 
W. Zimmerman; Clerk, B. W.Davis. 

1858 — Mayor, John Finley; Councilmen, S. R. Wiggins, 
J. M. Poe, A. Gaar, S. W. Lynde, J. H. Thomas, W. S. Reid, 
J. M. King, J. M. Smith; Assessor, N. Kewport; Collec- 
tor, C. R. Williams; Treasurer, John Suffrins; Marshal, W. 
Zimmerman; Clerk, B. W. Davis. 

1859— Mayor, John Finley; Councilmen, C. F. Coffin, J. 
M. Poe, S. W. Lynde, A. Gaar, W. S. Reid, J. P. Siddall, J. 
J. Conley, J. M, King; Assessor, J. C. Hadley; Collector, 
C. R. Williams; Treasurer, S. R. Wiggins; Marshal, W. 
Zimmerman; Clerk, W. W.Austin. 

1860 — Mayor, John Finley; Councilmen, C. F. Coffin, J. 
M. Poe, A. Gaar, H. R. Downing, W. S. Reid, J. M. Gaar, 
J. M. Smith, Wm. Petchell; Assessor, J. C. Hadley; Collec- 
tor, C. R. Williams; Treasurer, S. R. Wisfgins: Marshal, 
W.Zimmerman; Clerk, W. W.Austin. 

1861 — Mayor, John Finley; Councilmen, J. M. Poe, C. 
F. Coffin, T. McGirr, T. J. Bargis, J. H. Thomas, A. F. 
Scott, J. J. Conley, J. M. Blanchard ; Assessor, W. E. Wil- 
cox; Collector, C. R. Williams; Treasurer, S. R. Wiggins; 
Marshal, W. Zimmerman; Clerk, W. W. Austin. 

1862 — Mayor, John Finley; Councilmen, J. M. Poe, C. 
Leive, T. J. Bargis, T. McGirr, A. F. Scott, J. H. Thomas, 
J. J. Conley, James Smith; Assessor, W. E. Wilcox; Collec- 
tor, C. R. Williams; Treasurer, S. R. Wiggins; Marshal, 
W. Zimmerman; Clerk, W. W. Austin. 



CITY OF RICBMOND. 47 

1863— Mayor, John Finley; Councilmen, C. Leive, J.J. 
Conley, Thos. McGirr, T. J. Bargis, A. F. Scott, J. W. 
Grubbs, J. J. Jordan, T. N. Young; Assessor, L. M. Baxter; 
Collector, C. R. Williams; Treasurer, S. R. Wiggins; Mar- 
shal, W. Zimmerman; Clerk, W. W. Austin. 

1864 — Mayor, John Fin ley; Councilmen, James M, Poe, 
T. W.Roberts, Jesse Coifin, J. C. Hadley, EUwood Patter- 
son, A. F. Vaughn, W. L. Taylor, E. C. Kelley; Assessor, 
W. E. Wilcox; Collector, W. P. Wilson; Treasurer, S. R. 
Wiggins; Marshal, W. Zimmerman; Clerk, W. W. Austin. 

1865 — Mayor, John Finley; Councilmen, T. W. Roberts, 
G. W. Barnes, Jesse Coffin, Abram Earnest, W. S. Reid, H. 

B. Payne, E. C. Kelley, James Smith; Assessor, W. E. Wil- 
cox; Collector, W. P. Wilson; Treasurer, S. R. Wiggins; 
Marshal, W. Zimmerman; Clerk, W. W. Austin. 

1866 — Mayor, John Finley; Councilmen, G. W. Barnes, 
E. H. Page, A. Earnest, M. M. Lacy, W. S. Reid, A. F. 
Scott, Isaac Evans, E. C. Kelley; Assessor, J. W.Thompson; 
Collector, W. P. Wilson; Treasurer, S. R. Wiggins; Marshal, 
W. Zimmerman; Clerk, P. P. Kirn, 

1867 — Mayor, John Finley* (after which, Lewis D. 
Stubbs); Councilmen, G. W. Barnes, E. H. Page, A. Ear- 
nest, M. M. Lacy, W. S. Reid, A. F. Scott, Isaac Evans, E. 

C. Kelley; Assessor, J. W. Thompson; Collector, W. P. 
Wilson; Treasurer, S. R. Wiggins; Marshal, W. Zimmer- 
man; Clerk, P. P. Kirn. 

1867 — The New Charter was adopted December, 1866, and 
the first election under it took place on the first Tuesday of 
May, 1867. The following officers were elected; 

T. N. Young, Mayor; Councilmen, First Ward, James El- 
der, John Peterson; Second Ward, Thos. McGirr, E. D. 
Palmer; Third Ward, Ellwood Patterson, Jesse Coffin; Fourth 
Ward, Dedrick Meyer, K L. C. Watt; J. M. Hays, Assessor; 
W.P.Wilson, Treasurer; W. Zimmerman, Marshal; P. P. 
Kirn, Clerk. 

1868— T. K Young, Mayor; Councilmen, First Ward, 
James Elder, John Peterson; Second Ward, Thos. McGirr, 

*Mayor Finley died Dec. 24, 1865. Special election ordered for Jan. 
10, 1867, at which election Lewis D. Stubbs was elected Mayor, and 
served until May, 1867. 



48 HISTORY OF WAYNE COUNTY. 

E. D. Palmer; Third Ward, Ellwood Patterson, Jesse Coffin; 
Fourth Ward, Dedrick Meyer, N. L. C. Watt; J. M. Hays, 
Assessor; W. P. Wilson, Treasurer; W. Zimmerman, Mar- 
shal; P.P. Kirn, Clerk. 

1869— T. W. Bennett, Mayor; Conneilmen, First Ward, 
James Elder, John Peterson; Second Ward, E. D. Palmer, 
A.J. Bell; Third Ward, Ellwood Patterson, Jas. E. Reeves; 
Fourth Ward, JS". L. C. Watt, T. Henry Davis; Fifth Ward, 
A. A. Cnrme,|T. W. Roberts; J. M. Hays, Assessor; W. P. 
Wilson, Treasurer; W. Zimmerman, Marshal; P. P. Kirn, 
Clerk. 

1870— T. W. Bennett, Mayor; Councilmen, First Ward, 
James Elder, John Peterson; Second Ward, E. D. Palmer, 
A. J. Bell*; Third Ward, Ellwood Patterson, John M. Gaar; 
Fourth Ward, N. L. C. Watt, T. Henry Davis; Fifth Ward, 
A. A. Curme, T. W. Roberts; J. M. Hays, Assessor; W. P. 
Wilson, Treasurer; W. Zimmerman, Marshal; P. P. Kirn, 
Clerk. 

1871 — James M. Poe,' Mayor; Councilmen, First Ward, 
John Peterson, James Elder; Second Ward, Samuel Conklin, 
E. D. Palmer; Third Ward, Ezra Nye, Ellwood Patterson; 
Fourth Ward, Henry Krivel, N. L. C. Watt; Filth Ward, 
Thomas W. Bennett,t T. W. Roberts; Peter P. Kirn, Clerk; 
Wm. P. Wilson, Treasurer; Wm. Zimmerman, Marshal; 
James M. Hays, Assessor; John S. Lyle, City Attorney; R. 
A, Howard, Civil Engineer; C. C. Crockett, Street Commis- 
sioner. 

1872 — James M. Poe, Mayor; Councilmen, First Ward, 
James Elder, John Peterson; Second Ward, Samuel Conklin, 
Charles Estell; Third Ward, James F. Hibberd, Ezra Nye; 
Fourth Ward, N. L, C. Watt, Henry Krivel; Fifth Ward, 
Thos. W. Roberts, Elias H. Swayne; Peter P. Kirn, Clerk; 
W. P. Wi.son, Treasurer; Wm. Zimmerman, Marshal; John 
S. Lyle, City Attorne}'^; R. A. Howard, Civil Engineer; Dav. 
Haner, Street Commissioner; I. G. Dougan, Chief Engineer 
Fire DcjDartment. 

* A. J. Bell resigned July, 1870, aad Fielding Gaar was elected to fill the 
vacancy. 

t Thomas W. Bennett resigned Dec. 5. 1871, a-id Elias H. Swayne was 
elected to fill the vacancy. 



CITY OF EICHMOND. 49 

1873— James Elder, Mayor; Councilmen, First Ward,' E. 
F. Kosa, E. H. Page; Second Ward, Satnnel Conklin, Sam. 
Marlatt; Third Ward, Ezra Nye, James F. Hibberd; Fourth 
Ward, John H. Dickman, N. L. C. Watt; Fifth Ward, W. 
I. Diilin, Thos. W. Roberts; Peter P. Kirn, Clerk; W. P. 
Wilson, Treasurer; L. O. Shofer, Marslial; L. M. Baxter, As- 
sessor; J. S. Lyle, City Attorney; Oliver Butler, Civil En- 
gineer; David Planer, Street Cammissioner; I. Gr. Dougan, 
Chief Engineer Fire Department. 

1874— James Elder, Mayor; Councilmen, Fir.-;t Ward, 
John Peterson, E. F. Rosa; Second Ward, H. N. Land, Sam. 
Conklin; Third Ward, Thomas Nestor, Ezra Nye; Fourth 
Ward, N. L. 0. Watt, John H. Dickman; Fifth" Ward, D. 
K. Zeller, W. I. Dulin; Peter P. Kirn, Clerk; W. P. Wilson, 
Treasurer; L. O. Shofer, Marshal; L. M. Baxter, Assessor; 
John S. Lyle, City Attorney; Oliver Butler, Civil Engineer; 
David Haner, Street Commissioner; I. G. Dougan, Chief 
Engineer Fire Department. 

1875 — James F. Hibberd, ?Mayor; Councilmen, First Ward, 

E. F. Rosa, Louis Knopf; Second Ward, G. W. Bishop, 
Thomas McGirr; Third Ward, Ezra Nye, Thomas Nestor; 
Fourth Ward, T. Henry Davis, Charles Knollenberg; Fifth 
Ward, W. I. Dulin, D. K. Zeller; Cyrus O. Clark, Clerk; 
Wm. P. Wilson, Treasurer; L. O. Shofer, Marshal; Lewis 
M. Baxter, Assessor; John L. Rupe, City Attorney; Oliver 
Butler, Civil Engineer; E. D. Palmer, Street Commissioner; 
I. G. Dougan, Chief Engineer of Fire Department. 

1876 — Same officers as previous year, with the exception of 
Arthur A. Curme, Councilman in Fifth Ward, vice D. K. 
Zeller. 

1877— Thomas W. Bennett, Mayor; Councilmen, First 
Ward, E. F. Rosa, Louis Knopf; Second Ward, S. B. Harri- 
man, Thomas McGirr; Third Ward, Benj. Starr, Thos. Nestor; 
Fourth Ward, Chas. Knollenberg, T. Henry Davis; Fifth 
Ward, Peter C. Kidder, Arthur A. Curme; Cyrus O. Clark, 
Clerk; Wm. P. Wilson, Treasurer; L. O. Shofer, Marshal; 
Allen W. Grave, Assessor; John L. Rupe, City Attorney; 

F. C. Doran, Civil Engineer; E. D. Palmer, Street Commis- 
sioner; I. G. Dougan, Chief Engineer of Fire Department. 



50 HISTORY OF WAYNE COUNTY. 

1878— Thos. W. Bennett, Mayor; Councilmen, First 
Ward, Jolin G- Schwegman, E. F. Rosa; Second Ward, Wal- 
ter M, Richey, S. B. llarriman; Third Ward, Thomas W. 
Roberts, Benj. Starr;lFourth Ward, Chas. Knollenberg, T, 
Henry Davis; Fifth Ward, Arthur A. Cnrme, Peter C. Kid- 
der; Cyrus O. Clark,* Clerk; Wm. P. Wilson, Treasurer; 
L. O. Sliofer, Marshal; Allen W. Grave, Assessor; John L. 
Rupe, City Attorney; F. C. Doran, Civil Engineer; E. D. 
Palmer, Street Commissioner; I. G. Dougan, Chief Engineer 
of Fire Department, 

1879 — Thomas W. Bennett, Mayor; Councilmen, First 
Ward, E. F. Rosa, John G. Schwegman ; Second Ward, Wal- 
ter M. Richey, Thomas Nestor ;f Third Ward, Stephen R. 
Wiggins, Thos. W. Roberts; Fourth Ward, T. Henry Davis, 
Chas. Knollenberg; Fifth Ward, Peter C. Kidder, Arthur A. 
Curme; Richard H. King, Clerk; Wm. P. Wilson, Treasurer; 
L. O. Shofer, Marshal; Edward J. Salter, Assessor: John L. 
Rupe, City Attorney; F. C. Doran, Civil Engineer; E. D. 
Palmer, Street Commissioner; Wm. Alexander, Chief Engin- 
eer of Fire Department. 

1880-'81— Mayor, Thos. W. Bennett; Clerk, R. H. King; 
Marshal, L. O. Shofer; Treasurer, Jos. H. Cooke; Attorney, 
Jno. L. Rupe; Civil Engineer, F. C. Doran; Street Commis- 
sioner, E. D. Palmer; City Measurer, Jas. M. King; Wood 
Measurer, Jos. F. Rowlett; Chief of Fire Department, Wm. 
W. Alexander; Councilmen, First Ward, E. F. Rosa, Jno. G. 
Schwegman; Second Ward, J. J. Jordan, W. M. Richey; 
Third Ward, S. R. Wiggins, L. K. Harris; Fourth Ward, T. 
Henry Davis, A. W. Meyer; Fifth Ward, P. C. Kidder, A. 
A. Curme. 

1881-'82— Mayor, Thomas W. Bennett; Clerk, Richard H. 
King; Marshal, Louis O. Shofer; Deputy Marshal, Joseph 
F. Rowlett; Treasurer, Joseph H. Cooke; City Attorney, 
John L. Rupe; Civil Engineer, Frank C. Doran; Street Com- 
missioner, Frank M. Wheelan; City Measurer, James M. 
King; Wood Measurer, John Elliott; City Commissioners, 
Edward E. Beetle, John D. Wiggins, Andrew F. Scott, Fran- 

* Died July 13, 1878. R. H. King was elected to fill the vacancy, 
t Died Aug. 12, 1879 ; succeeded by James J. Jordan. 



CITY OF RICHMOND. , 51 

cis Pruyn, John L. Thompson; Councilmen, First Ward, 
Earnest F. Eosa, John G. Schweorman; Second Ward, James 
J. Jordan, Elwood Morris; Third Ward, Thomas W. Roberts, 
Lewis K. Harris; Fourth Ward, Adolph W. Meyer, Joseph 
P. Iliff; Fifth Ward, Arthur A. Cnrme, Oliver Yates. 

1882-'83— Mayor, Thomas W. Bennett; Clerk, Richard H. 
King; Marshal, Louis O. Shofer; Treasurer, Joseph H. Cooke; 
City Attorney, John L. Rupe; Civil Engineer, Frank C. Do- 
ran; Street Commissioner, Frank M. Wheelan; City Meas- 
urer, James M. King; Wood Measurer, John Elliott; City 
Commissioners, Edward E. Beetle, John D. Wiggins, Andrew 
F. Scott, Francis Pruyn, John L. Thompson; Councilmen, 
First Ward, Earnest F. Rosa, John G. Schwegman; Second 
Ward, James J. Jordan, Elwood Morris; Third AVard, 
Thomas W. Roberts, Lewis K. Harris; Fourth Ward, Joseph 
P. IliflP, Henry Temme; Fifth Ward, Arthur A. Curme, 
Oliver Yates. 

1883-84. Mayor, John L. Rupe; Clerk, Richard H. King; 
Marshal, John Fred Haner; Treasurer, Joseph H. Cook; City 
Attorney, Joseph H. Kibbey; Civil Engineer, Frank C. Do- 
ran; Street Commissioner, Frank M. Wheelan; City Meas- 
urer, James M. King; Wood Measm-er, J. M. Leviston; 
City Commissioners, Edward E. Beetle, John D. Wiggins, 
Andrew F. Scott, John L. Thompson, John H. Roling. Com- 
mon Councilmen: First Ward, Earnest F. Rosa, John G. 
Schwegman; Second Ward, Elwood Morris, Samuel Mar- 
latt; Third Ward, Thomas W. Roberts, D. P. Wheelan; 
Fourth Ward, William Bartel, Henry Temme; Fifth Ward, 
Arthur A. Curme, Oliver Yates. 

CITY BUILDING. 

The Warner building, in which the city offices are, was 
erected by Dr. Ithamer Warner, an early physician, and a 
much honored citizen of Richmond. It was built for a resi- 
dence, public hall, etc. Dr. Warner died in 1835, and in his 
will gave the town the rental of the property. The greater 
portion of the building is rented to various parties for school 
purposes, and brings in a revenue of about $400 per year. 



52 



HISTORY OF WAYNE COUNTY. 



TREASUKER S REPORT 

of the financial condition of the city of Richmond, Ind., for 
the fiscal year ending April 30, 1883. 
General Fund. 



RECEIPTS . 



Balance May 1, 1882 

Current taxes 

Delinquent taxes 

Fire department 

Licenses 

Fines and costs 

Redemption of lots 

Public buildings, rent of orphans' home. 

Loan 

City farm 

Unexpended balance flood donation. . . . 

Benefits 

Street Benefits 

Estray fund 

Printer's fee, delinquent list 



Total receipts. 



DISBURSEMENTS. 



Streets 

Police 

Fire department 

Salary 

Loan from railroad interest... 

Donation to flood suflerers 

Calaboose 

Printing 

Stationery. 

Gas and lamps 

Public buildings 

Bonded debt 

Interest 

Fees 

Elections 

Surveys 

Tax refunded 

Commission 

Board of Health 

City commissioners 

Sewers 

Home 

Street damages 

Incidentals 

Damages paid StaflTord 

Board of public improvements. 

Redemption from tax sales 

Sale of Estrays 

Court costs 



Total disbursed.. 

Bal ance , gen eral f u n d . 



$23,007.35 

8,165.00 

12,322.95 

6,400.00 

2,629.90 

2,000.00 

318.93 

410.74 

221.42 

5,905.38 

844.23 

23,600.00 

302.11 

1,359.10 

125.00 

34.25 

205.06 

43.24 

752.00 

3'i5.00 

4,073.02 

150.00 

539.94 

180.50 

400.00 

282.00 

1,702.32 

13.04 

61.45 



^33,113.55 

76,113.23 

1,825.22 

224.70 

1,892.79 

22.00 

1,063.86 

149.93 

26,229.90 

10.00 

19.48 

300.00 

1,672.83 

13.04 

15.60 



1142,665.63 



1,413.93 



$46,251.70 



CITY OF RICHMOND. 53 

CITY FINANCES — CONTINUED. 

Total balance in special funds * 3 501 84 

Total balance in general fund 46 25 1 70 

Grand total $49,753.54 

BONDED INDEBTEDNESS. 

Forty-three railroad bonds, due July 1, 1889 $43,000.00 

Cash on hand in the railroad principal and interest, to meet 

same _ 3,501.84 

Net city indebtedness $39,498.16 

CITY LIMITS. 

The city of Hichinond has been extended from time to 
time during the past seventy years of its existence, and in its 
limits is now embraced an area of two and a half miles east 
and west, and two miles north and south. It is likely that 
quite a large addition will soon be made covering ground 
recently purchased by a syndicate, and lying on the opposite 
or west side of the "Whitewater River. 

Prior to 1840, the original plat of Richmond, as laid off 
by John Smith, had received eight additions made by Jeremiah 
Cox, Charles W. Starr, Isaac Jones, Achilles Williams, Rob- 
ert Morrisson, Caleb Bond, Jesse Iden and Joseph Plummer. 
As is shown by a map made by William Dewey in 1840, no 
lots had been laid off farther east than what is now Elev- 
enth street, on the north side of Main. Above North B 
street, Sixth street (now Ninth) was the limit of the lots, and 
they extended as far north as Vine (now North D) street. 
There were but few lots marked off northwest of Front street 
and Fort Wayne avenue, all of which are now known by the 
latter name. A triangular piece of land lying between Fort 
Wayne avenue and Washington avenue, and extending north 
to High street, is marked "Northern Liberties "on the map, 
and was at the extreme northern limit of the platted portion 
of the city. 

South of Main street. South street (now South E street) 
marked the southern limit; Marion street (now South Sixth) 
was the eastern limit of lots as far north as Market (now 



54 



HISTORY OF WAYNE COUNTY. 



South B); and the extreme eastern limit was Sixth (now 
Ninth street), with the exception of one tier of lots in a block 
adjoining Main and extending soutli to South A. 



TABLE OF TAX LEVIES. 



The following table shows the valuation of property and the 
amount of taxes each year, from 1840 to 1882, in the city of 
Richmond : 





ON 








ON 


f 






$100. 


VALUATION. 


AMOUNT. 


1862 


$100. 


VALUATION. 


AMOUNT. 


1840 


$1.00 


$215,460 


$2,154.60 


45 


$2,409,836 


$10,844.26 


1841 


1.00 


298.340 


2,983.40 


1863 


45 


2.595,495 


11,479.73 


1843 


75 


308,260 


2,311.96 


1864 


70 


3,157,438 


22,102.06 


1843 


40 


369,175 


1,477.70 


1865 


1.00 


3,772,813 


37,728.13 


1844 


50 


344,250 


1,721.25 


1866 


1.00 


4,029,857 


40,298.58 


1845 


50 


291,397 


1,456.94 


1867 


1.00 


4,60ii,600 


46,066.00 


1846 


50 


287,268 


1,436.34 


1868 


1.10 


5,594,693 


61,541.62 


1847 


50 


285,465 


1,427.32 


1869 


1.35 


7,107,762 


95,954.78 


1848 


50 


282,293 


1,411.46 


1870 


1.35 


7,200,133 


97,201.79 


1849 


50 


412 229 


2,061.46 


1871 


1.09 


5,611,5:8 


61,166.20 


1850 


65 


436,895 


2,839.81 


1872 


1.81 


9,656,176 


174,776.78 


1851 


55 


398,950 


2,194.22 


1873 


1.54 


9,913,365 


152,665.83 


1852 


50 


410,760 


2 053.80 


1874 


1.47 


8,087,204 


118,881.89 


1853 


50 


601,480 


3,007.40 


1875 


1.05 


8,699,053 


91,340.05 


1854 


40 


1,264,350 


5,057.40 


1876 


1.05 


8,841,618 


92,836.98 


1855 


40 


1,325,200 


5,300.80 


18^7 


1.00 


8,210,095 


82,100.95 


1856 


40 


1,535,490 


6,142.05 


1878 


1.00 


7,955,855 


79,558.55 


1857 


30 


1,913,585 


5,740.75 


1879 


1.00 


7,677,400 


76,774.00 


1858 


60 


1.942,645 


11,755.87 


1880 


1.00 


7,787,315 


77,873.15 


1859 


70 


1,965,280 


13,757.96 


1881 


1.00 


7,867,677 


78,676.77 


1860 


65 


2 280,530 


14,823.44 


1882 


1.00 


8,249,975 


82,499.75 


1861 


65 


2,528,937 


16,438.09 









P08T0FFICE. 

The office was established in 1818, and Robert Morrisson 
became the first Postmaster. The growth of Richmond may 
be gathered from the fact that the receipts the first year were 
a trifle over $9, and postage nearly or quite ten times its 
present rate. The receipts in 1824 were less than $25. In 
1856 they reached the sum of $1,406.13. The " Board of 
Trade Review" for 1875 gives the following interesting statis- 
tics of the business of the office for the preceding year, that 
of 1874 : 

STAMPS, POSTAL CARDS, STAMPED ENVELOPES, AND NEWSPAPER 
WRAPPERS DURING THE YEAR 1874. 

Stamps, 426,882; amount, $11,063.08. Postal cards, 93,- 
285; amount, $932.85. Stamped envelopes, 90,213; amount. 



CITY OF RICHMOND. 



55 



$2,338.97. Wrappers, 32,669; amount, $368.48. Grand total 
immber sold during year, 643,0:^9; grand total amount, $14,- 
Y03.38. 

NUMBER AND WEIGHT OF NEWSPAPER AND OTHER PACKAGES 
SENT AND RECEIVED DURING THE YEAR 1874. 



KIND OF MATTER. 



Regular newspapers mailed 

Book and miscellaneous mailed 

Transient newspapers mailed , 

Unsealed ci<rculars mailed 

Letters mailed , 

Postal cards mailed 

Mail letters and postal cards delivered , 

Drop letters and postal cards delivered , 

Unsealed circulars delivered 

Mail news- 1 Published once a week or of tener. 157,196 

papers •< Periodicals less than once a week. 9,256 

delivered. ( Transient newspapers. 219,076 



NO.PACK- 


WEIGHT, 


AGE8. 


LBS. 


62,835 


10,400 


2,909 


1,573 


86,163 


11,804 


50,024 


1,495 


340,690 




62,400 




321,550 




15,600 




67,.392 




885,528 





MONEY ORDER BUSINESS FOR THE YEAR 1874. 



KIND OF ORDERS. 


ISSUED. 


PAID. 




NO. 


VALUE. 


NO • 


VALUE . 


Domestic ... 


5,012 
12 
15 

5,089 


$54,944 
247 
257 


4,520 
8 

1 


$73,588 


British 


89 




16 






Total 


$55,448 


4,529 


$78 643 



Registered letters mailed 



417 
delivered 1,519 



Richmond was made a free-delivery postoffice Jan. 1, 
1881. Seven carriers and seven clerks are now employed. 
During the year ending June 30, 1883, the mail matter de- 
livered was as follows: 

Letters, 546,051; postal cards, 198,990; local letters, 
44,692; local postal cards, 17,975; registered letters, 2,816; 
newspapers, 427,878. 

Matter collected: Letters, 333,866; postal cards, 143,525; 



56 HISTORY OF WAYNE COUNTY. 

newspapers, 168,499; total number of pieces handled (de- 
livered and collected), 1,884,292. 

Receipts, expenses and net revenue of Richmond postoffice 
for the year ending June 30, 1883: Gross revenue, $28,37Y.- 
20; office expenses, $7,094.46; free delivery expenses, $4,- 
945.78; total expenses, $12,040.24; net revenue, $16,336.96; 
per cent, of expenses on ^ross revenue, 42. 

The Postmasters of Richmond, with the dates of their 
several commissions are given below : Robert Morrisson, 
1818; Daniel Reed, 1829; James W. Borden, Aug. 27, 1836; 
John C. Merrick, December, 1839; Lynde Elliott, Feb. 25, 
1840; Achilles Williams, May 31, 1841; Daniel D. Sloan, 
Aug. 16, 1843 ; James Elder, Jan. 10, 1846 ; Caleb R. 
Williams, March 16, 1849, James Elder, April -18, 1853; 
Achilles Williams, April 2, 1861; Edwin A. Jones, Oct. 
26, 1866; Isaac H. Julian, April 5, 1869; Benjamin W. 
Davis, May 25, 1871; Almon Samson, 1878; E. D. Palmer, 
May 15, 1882. 

The salary of the postmaster (according to the Postmaster 
General's report for the tiscal year ending June 30, 1883) is 
$2,500; salary allowed clerks, $3,318. Other allowances 
make up a total of salary and allowances amounting to 
$7,103. 

STREET RAILROADS. 

Richmond has so far progressed in metropolitan ways as to 
have street railways. These were first started in running 
order in September, 1873. In March of that year, a charter 
was granted to S. C. Mendenhall, its projector, William S. 
Reid, D. K. Zeller, Isaac C. Teague, Abijah Moffitt, Dr. 
Houghton, C. F. Coffin and Joseph Dickinson. S, C. Men- 
denhall was elected President; C. F. Coffin, Treasurer, and 
Joseph Dickinson, Secretary. In 1876 Isaac C. Teague 
leased the road for one year, at the expiration of which time, 
the spring of 1877, the company sold out to J. F. Miller, 
when the present Street Railroad Company was formed. The 
Superintendent of the road is F. M. Francisco, who has acted 
as such from 1873 to 1876, and from 1880 to the present time. 
There are about three and a half miles of road in operation 



CITY OF RICHMOND. 5Y 

at this time The cars run from the court-house to Glen 
Miller, and from Mam and Eighth street to the Union Depot 
The company have five cars and good stable accommodations' 
on Seventh street. The directory is composed of William E 
Bell, Thomas Rose, J. 0. Ratliff, J. F. Miller and James 
Turner. J. C. Miller, President; J. C. Ratliff, Vice-Presi- 
dent, and H. I. Miller, Secretary and Treasurer. 

EXPRESS COMPANIES. 

The first express ofiice opened in Richmond was by Locke 
& Co., who were succeeded by the American Express Com- 
pany. Then came next the United States Express Company, 
in 1863. M. Y. Graff was the agent of both companies at 
the time the latter opened its office until his death in 1865, 
when his son, P. C. Graff, succeeded to the agency. Another 
office called the Merchants' Union Express was opened a few 
years later, with E. G. Hibberd as agent, but it was soon 
merged into the American, and the agent of the two first, P. 
C. Graff, still continued to hold the position, until the United 
States Express Company opened a separate office. This latter 
company appointed J. Izor as their agent, who served until 
his death, when D. P. Hiatt was chosen to fill the vacancy. 
Messrs. Graff and Hiatt filled the position of agents of the 
two companies until they again occupied one office, when 
Mr. Graff was continued as the agent of both. On Nov. 
1, 1881, the Adams Express Company opened its office in 
Richmond, and occupied for a month the same office with the 
other companies, Mr. Graff acting for all. Soon after, the 
United States opened a separate office, appointing a Mr. 
Richey, of Muncie, Ind., its agent. He resigned the next 
year, 1882, and T. C. Davis succeeded him, who still holds 
the position, Mr. Graff being the agent of Adams and Amer- 
ican until June 1, 1883, when the American retired from the 
field, turning its territory over to the Adams and United 
States Express companies, Mr. Graff still being the agent 
of the Adams. 

GAS-WOEKS. 

In July, 1854, a charter was obtained by Charles Collier 
for the Richmond Gas Light and Coke Company. The com- 



58 HISTORY OF WAYNE COUNTY, 

pany was organized in June, 1855, with a capital of $25,000. 
Its stockholders were Charles Collier, Robert Morrisson, Will- 
iam Cain, John T. Plumtner and Williata R. "Webster. 
John T. Plummer was its first President; William R. Web- 
ster, Secretary; William Cain, Treasurer. The works were 
built by Charles Collier, and completed in December, 1855. 
In December, ,1856, they were leased to Starr & White 
(James M. Starr and Benjamin C. "White), who carried on 
the business for about thirteen years. A new charter was 
granted in 1870. J. M. Starr was then President, and Ben- 
jamin Starr, Secretary. The receipts for gas for that year 
were $19,000. Ninety-one street lamps were supplied and 
over 700 private consumers. In 1871 the capital stock of 
the gas company was raised to $100,000. In 1882-'83 the 
works were entirely rebuilt and supplied with new machinery. 
The capacity of the works is now 500,000 feet per day. Two 
hundred and twenty-eight street lamps and about 1,100 pri- 
vate consumers are now supplied by them. Mr. Starr has 
owned the entire works since 1868. C. C.Binkley has served 
as Secretary since 1874. 

RICHMOND INDUSTRIAL ASSOCIATION. 

This association was organized in 1870 as a joint stock 
company, to conduct the business of ordinary county agricult- 
ural societies on an amplified and more diversified basis. 
Thirty-three acres of suitable ground were secured in the 
northeast corner of the city corporate limits, alongside of 
the tracks of the Columbus, the Dayton and the Cincinnati 
railroads. This ground was improved by the erection of ap- 
propriate buildings for the exhibition of the fine arts, fruits 
and other products of the soil, live stock, manufactures, agri- 
cultural implements, farm products, and all the usual variety 
of articles spread out at agricultural fairs. An excellent 
time-track was constructed, and abundant stables and sheds 
provided. 

Fairs were held for a few years, but the association finally 
died, and is mentioned here only as a record of the past. 



CITY OF RICHMOND. 59 

THE FIRE DEPARTMENT. 

The first regularly organized fire company in Richmond 
seems to have been formed in 1830. According to information 
furnished by John A. Wright, who was secretary of the meet- 
ing, the citizens met at Jeft'ries' tavern on the 6th of De- 
cember, 1830, and fifteen names were enrolled as members of 
the company, viz. : Benj. Fulghum, Aaron Pleas, William 
Dulin, Lewis Burk, Jesse Stutler, Zimri Strattan, Ephraim 
Rulin, Levi P. Rothermel, Abraham Jeffries, Wm. N. Cam- 
mack, Job W. Swain, Jehiel Wasson, John A. Wright and 
Leander Gary. Job Swain presided. 

Prior to this meeting a fire engine had been bought, in 
1829, for $600. It was an oblong box, 4x6 feet, and one 
foot deep, mounted on wheels. It was moved by a rope, to 
which pins for the hands to grasp were attached at suitable 
distances. About midway on each side of the box and at- 
tached to it were fixed upright standards for the support of 
the operating machinery. The latter consisted of a cross- 
shaft with two cranks placed at right angles with it and op- , 
posite each other; this shaft was provided with suitable bear- 
ings in the uprights. Another shaft, similarly arranged, was 
placed above the first, and at each end of it was a driving- 
wheel, the cogs of which were geared into pinions on either 
side of the shaft. The driving-wheels were each provided 
with pin handles for turning, of sufficient strength for six 
men at each wheel. The bottom of the box supported two 
cylinders, which were attached to it, and constituted the 
pumps. They were about four inches in diameter and twelve 
in height. Piston rods, with valve heads, working in stuffing 
boxes which formed the tops or caps of the pumps, were con- 
nected with the cranks of the shaft, by the revolutions of 
which the pumps were worked. A branch pipe connected the 
bottoms of the pumps, terminating in a common orifice, to 
which the hose and to that the nozzle was attached. Orifices 
opened from the lower end of the pump, connecting this with 
the box in which the water was stored, and thus performing 
the functions of the modern suction hose. The box, or tank, 
was filled with water by buckets brought by hand. 



60 HISTORY OF WAYNE COUNTY. 

Until Feb. 6, 1833, the company met at Jeffries' hotel. 
They then changed to the Warner building, now the city 
building. 

A new company was formed in 1832, with the following 
members. It will be seen that the list includes most of the 
business men of that period: Ithamer Warner, James Henrj', 
Jonas Gaar, James Stuckey, Alexander Price, David Hook, 
William Oox, John Snffrins, Benjamin Fulghum, Zimri Strat- 
tan, Andrew Furguson, Rese Jones, Matthew Rattray, Ban- 
ner Lawhead, W. K. Cammack, John T. Smith, Alexander 
Moore, Aaron Johnson, L. P. Rothermel, John Brady, Lewis 
Burk, Wm. Sutherland, Wm. Wiggins, Daniel Morrisson, 
Samuel Springer, Samuel T. Ogborn, Abel Thornburg, 
Thomas J. Larsh, John Way and Ira S. Center. Benjamin 
Fulghum was President; Matthew Rattray, Yice- President; 
William Cox, Secretary, and Ithamer Warner, Treasurer. 
This company offered its resignation to the trustees of the 
town in January, 1834, and it was accepted. 

In the early part of the fourth decade of the present cent- 
ury, a man named Quiner moved to Richmond from Massa- 
chusetts. He gave a glowing account of an engine which 
was then being manufactured in Boston, and induced the 
citizens of Richmond to purchase one. In 1836 the engine 
afterward famous as the " Old Hunker" reached this town, 
having come from Boston to Cincinnati, whence it was trans- 
ported by '' prairie schooner '"' to its destination. This engine 
had a suction hose and was considered a marvel. The bucket 
company was no longer necessary to supply water. An en- 
gine-house was erected on Pearl street, and for better water- 
supply large wells were dng in several parts of the town. 

The earliest record now in existence is a minute-book of 
the proceedings of the "Old Hunker Fire Co., No. 2," under 
the date Feb. 6, 1850, when a constitution and by-laws were 
adopted and the following officers chosen: W. L. Farquhar, 
President; W. T. Shearon, Vice-President; S. R. Jamison, 
Secretary; Wm. W. Rattray, Treasurer; E. H. Page and 
John Stanton, Directors. 

In 1854 the "Old Hunker" Company was reorganized 
with John M. Paxson, President; J. L. Meek, Vice-President; 



CITY OF RICHMOND. Qi 

W. T. Mendeahall, Secretary; and Thomas Yickers, Treas- 
urer. 

The third engine of the city was purchased at Cincinnati, 
Nov. 6, 1850. It was known as the "Rowboat." The bill 
described it thus: 

"One twenty-men horizontal fire-engine $1 000 

300 feet copper-twist hose and coupling 210 

One fire-hat and trumpet. . , 

" Total $1,210" 

It appears that Company No. 3 was organized Dec. 14, 
1850, under the name of the Hoosier Fire Company, and at 
a subsequent meeting adopted the constitution and by-laws of 
the Franklin Fire Company of Cincinnati. J. H. Button 
was chosen President; Jesse M. Hutton, Vice-President; A. 
W. Mendenhall, Treasurer; S. F. Fletcher and John Conlej, 
Directors; Ezra Smith, Messenger. 

At a meeting held April 2, 1853, the city council was asked 
to remit taxes to the amount of $3 to members of the fire 
companies. The request was granted, and this was the first 
instance of the fire-men of Richmond being allowed remuner- 
ation. 

"Old Hunker" continued in use until 1857, when the city 
purchased an engine known as the Quaker City engine, to 
take its place, at a cost of $1,579. The former was kept 
" boarding round," without a home, until 1855, when J, L. 
Meek and E. H. Page succeeded in raising a fund by subscrip- 
tion for the erection of Engine House, No. 2, at a cost of 
$1,162. In 1857, the Hoosier Company erected a house for 
their engine, "The Rowboat," just north of the city ofiices, 
at a cost of $2,390. 

In the fall of 1858 Washington Fire Company, composed 
principally of Germans, was organized. They erected a house 
in 1859, on a lot donated by John J. Conley, had a second- 
hand-engine, and did efiicient service. They bought another 
old engine in Dayton in 1863. This was the last hand-engine 
purchased. 

The question of procuring a steam fire-engine was agitated 



62 HISTORY OF WAYNE COUNTY. 

by several prominent citizens in 1859, but nothing was ac- 
complished until the following year. An engine was pur- 
chased by the city council in 1860, and a house for it erected 
at a total cost of $6,577. 

The Mechanics Fire Company, No. 4, was organized Jan. 
6, 1861, with J. M. Gaar, President; E. H. Page, James M. 
Smith, W. G. Scott and J. W. Starr, Yice-Presidents; J. M. 
Blanchard, Secretary; and Thomas Newby, Treasurer. The 
fire companies in 1861 were therefore Washington (No. 1), 
Quaker City (No. 2), Hoosier (No. 3), and Mechanics (No. 4), 
each having abjut 100 men. 

One of the first fires which the steamer was called upon 
to subdue was that of the pork-packing house of Yanneman, 
Eeid & Co., which raged for fifteen hours. 

In 1866 a hook and ladder company was organized and 
equipped at a cost of about $1,000. In 1871 No. 4 was ex- 
changed for a new engine. In 1872 a second steamer was pro- 
cured by exchanging two of the hand-engines and paying the 
difi'erence, and in the same year the fire department of the city 
was made a paid department. The National Fire- Alarm system 
of electric alarms was adopted in 1876 at a cost of $4,750. An 
inventory of the property belonging to the fire department, 
made May 1, 1883, shows that the total value of the same is $22,- 
746. Total expenditures for the year (including $8,513.36, 
paid in salaries), $12,322.95. Nine horses are in the service 
of the department. 

OFFICERS OF THE FIRE DEPARTMENT FOR 1883-'4. 

Council Committee — Messrs. Curme, Wheelan and Temme; 
Chief Engineer, William W. Alexander. 

Company No. 1 — Engineer, Irvin J. Brown; Fireman, 
David Miller; Driver of Engine, George Wilson; Driver of 
Reel, John B. Tracy; Minute Men, Pat. McKinley, Jesse Mc 
CuUough, Walter Webster, George Belott. 

Company No. 2 — Engineer, James Parsons; Fireman, Chas. 
Herbeler; Driver of Engine, Rufus A. Newman; Driver of 
Reel, Clark Yeager; Minute Men, Wm. L. Thomas, John 
Estell, Chas. Ilessman, Mart. Hudson. 



CITY OF RICHMOND. 63 

Hook and Ladder, No. 1— Driver, John S. Neal; Pilot, 
Thomas E. Ross; Minute Men, Dick Bird, Jeff. Wilson, Wm. 
J. Smith, Dick Estell. 

WATER-WORKS. 

At the present writing, appearances indicate that water- 
works in the city will soon become an established fact. The 
Kiehraond Water-Works Company was incorporated July 16, 
1883, with the following Directors: S. L, Wiley, John W. 
Grubbs, S. R. Wiggins, D. K. Zeller, Ellis Thomas and W. P. 
Hutton. Capital stock, $250,000. Feb. 19, 1884, the company 
was fully organized with the following officers: A. E. Crocker, 
President; J. W. Grubbs, Yice-President; J. A. Norton, 
Secretary; W. P. Hutton, Treasurer. 

Operations will soon be commenced, and it is expected that 
the works will be completed during the year 1884. The Holly 
system with the Wiley improvement will be used. 




CHAPTER III. 



INDUSTRIAL INTERESTS OF RICHMOND. 



An Account of the Origin and Growth of the Jndctstrial 
Wealth of the City. — Introductory. — Early Manufact- 
uring Establishments. — Early Tanneries, Mills, Brew- 
eries, Carding and Woolen Mills, Foundries, Cotton 
Mills, etc. — Leading Manufacturing Establishments of 
Later Times. — Historical Accounts of the Leading In- 
dustries OF To-day. — The Founders and Incorporators. — 
Business Changes. — Present Proprietors and Amount of 
Capital Invested. — The Banks of Richmond. —Summary 
OF Business Interests. 

The city of Richmond has become noted as the seat of im- 
portant manufactories, ranking high in this respect among 
the cities of the West. Its industrial growth began early 
and has been gradual but constant. The early settlers per- 
ceived that the inland situation of the town, at a time when 
railroads were unknown, precluded extensive commercial 
relations with the rest of the world, and therefore wisely de- 
voted themselves to fostering and encouraging home interests, 
establishing manufactures and thus laying the permanent 
foundations of the future greatness and prosperity of the 
city. The advent of railroads gave an impetus to business 
of every kind, making the beginning of an era of more 
rapid development. Few cities in the West — few, indeed, 
anywhere in the country — have, in proportion to population, 
a greater variety and extent of business interests than Rich- 
mond. The city is steadily and rapidly increasing in wealth, 
population and commercial importance. 

In this chapter will be found a brief account of some of 
the earliest enterprises of the city, together with carefully 
prepared sketches of the most important establishments of 

64 



"^, 



r J 








c^^/^ 



CITY OF RICHMOND. 65 

the present time. Many more might be mentioned, but 
want of space forbids an account of any except leading in- 
dustrial interests. 

EARLY INDUSTRIES. 

A tannery was started in Kichmond in 1818, by John 
Smith, and operated by Joseph Wilraot. Another of seventy 
vats was established by Kobert Morrieson during the same 
year. It was located on the north side of Main street, be- 
tween Washington and Green streets. 

Early grist-mills are elsewhere mentioned. One of the 
lirst industries of the town was a brewery, established by 
Ezra Bos well, about 1816. His shop was on Front street, 
north of Main. It is said that he had a good patronage. 

About the year 1818 Daniel S. Anthony erected a carding- 
mill at the junction of Fort Wayne avenue and old Pearl 
street (now Fifth street), where he carried on business several 
years. The machinery used in the old mill was rude and 
primitive but it served a useful purpose. The motive power 
was horse-power, a single horse in a tread-mill. Mr. An- 
thony returned to the East and settled in Jewett City, Conn., 
where he became a wealthy and prominent citizen and served 
several years as a bank president. He was born in Rhode 
Island in the latter part of the last century and is a first 
cousin of Senator Anthony. He was still living in January, 
1884. 

Christian Buhl, a German, established a brewery as early 
as 1830, on Main street. He continued the business several 
years, making money rapidly for those days. 

Near the present site of the gas-works a woolen factory was 
established by Philip Harter, about 1827. It was run only 
about five years. The water-power was furnished by springs, 
part of the water being conducted by pipes under the river, 
from a source near William Baxter's residence, and the rest 
from the east side of the river. 

JSTear the same period Job W. Swain and Jonas Gaar 
erected a carding-mill on South Front (now Fourth street). 
They operated it in the winter season only, Gaar working as 
a cabinet maker and Swain as an iron-worker during the rest 



66 HISTORY OF WAYNE COUNTY. 

of the year. They worked in this manner until the fall ot 
1835, when they commenced the manufacture of woolen ma- 
chinery and general jobbing work. 

In 1831, Grover & "Williams erected a foundry for the 
manufacture of stoves, plows, etc., In 1836 Swain & Gaar 
consolidated their business with that of Grover & Williams, 
and the lirm of Tliornburg, Haynes & Co. was formed, 
Abel Thornburg and John Haynes being among the proprie- 
tors. They made woolen-mill machinery and did a large 
amount of casting, employing from seventy-five to one hun- 
dred men; but in 1838 they were overtaken by misfortune. A 
little later they wei'e succeeded by Ellis Nordyke and Shipley 
Foulke, who carried on a less extensive business, manufactur- 
ing stoves principally. The machine shop and foundry were 
subsequently in the hands of different proprietors and finally 
were abandoned. The lot is now occupied by the county 
jail. 

About 1828 a silk factory was started, near the site of the 
Green street mill, by George W. Howlett, who carried on the 
business a number of years. He brought cocoons to Rich- 
mond and raised the silkworms here, in a building on the 
corner of Twelfth and Main streets. Mr. Rowiett also 
brought to the county the first shingle machine for cutting 
shingles with a knife from steamed lumber. This he located 
two miles north of Richmond, on the Union Branch turnpike, 
whence he afterward removed it to a location near "Washing- 
ton. He removed to Jay County later, and there engaged in 
farming until his death, in 1857. Mr. Rowiett was a native 
of Philadelphia, born of English parents. His grandfather 
was a native of France. The name was originally spelled 
Roulette. Mr. Rowiett was a noted mathematician, and 
gained a high reputation as a school-teacher. Two ot his 
sons, O. B. and J. Y., who are elsewhere mentioned, are both 
in business in Richmond, and are the inventors of valuable 
machinery. 

Jesse Clark, who came from North Carolina, built the first 
fulling-mill in the county, two miles north of Richmond. 
After a few years he transferred the machinery to a building 
which stood on or near the present site of the Green street 



CITY OF KICHMOND. 67 

douring mill. Samuel Test and Warner M. Leeds leased the 
mill and added machinery for carding, spinning and weav- 
ing. In 1825 the property was leased to Levinus, Thomas 
W. and Dean King. In 1827 the Public Ledger stated : 
" The Messrs. King are extending their woolen factory with 
laudable enterprise. They have recently commenced the 
manufacture of broadcloth, in a manner which does them 
credit. They have also commenced the manufacture of 
blankets." Levinus King became sole proprietor in 1834. 
Three years later a company known as the Richmond Trading 
and Manufacturing Company was formed. Its members 
were Levinus King, of the woolen-mill ; Warner M. Leeds 
and Isaac E. Jones, owners of the paper-mill; and James R. 
Mendenhall, proprietor of the Cox grist-milL The company 
continued business until 1843. Mr. King then took charge 
and ran the mill until 1853. It was afterward changed to a 
flax-dressing mill. 

Two Englishmen, direct from London, began the establish- 
ment of a brewery in 1827, which the PuUic Ledger pre- 
dicted would be successful. The editor also thought that " the 
wholesome beverage should take the place of the burning 
whisky which is now so common." This brewery was at the 
old Cushman distillery. 

Even in 1827 the manufacturing interests, the foundation 
of the future prosperity of Richmond, had already become 
large in comparison with the size of the town. Encouraged 
by the outlook, the editor of the Ledger called for the estab- 
lishment of a satinet factory and a cotton factory. The latter 
soon appeared. 

About 1831 Charles W. Starr built a cotton factory just 
above the bridge on the Williamsburg turnpike. It was op- 
erated by him several years and then sold to Job Swain, who 
sold the mill machinery and established a peg-factory in the 
building. Isaac E. Jones afterward converted it into a silk- 
factory. This was succeeded by a grist-mill, called the 
Spring Mill. Joseph P. Laws bought the property later and 
established a tannery, which also passed out of existence. 

A woolen factory was started by William Bancroft about 
1835, in a mill on the site afterward occupied by Mering's 



6,8 HISTORY OF WAYNE COUNTY. 

grist-mill. It was afterward managed by Caleb Shreve, Le- 
vinus King and Christian Buhl, snccessivelj, and then dis- 
continued. 

The old cotton factory which was started in 1826 by Samuel 
Smith was afterward the property of Chas. W. Starr, and 
the cotton-mill was abandoned in 1836 ; then the building 
was turned into a shoe-peg factory, and from that to a 
machine shop, and then to a silk factory in 1842, This 
proved a failure and the next was a grist-mill, and last a 
tannery. This building that had been used for so many 
different kinds of business, and nothing long, was located 
near the present site of the Gaar Machine Works, 

PKOMINENT INDUSTRIAL ESTABLISHMENTS. 

Book Bindery. — The only establishment of this kind in 
the city is that of l^icholson & Bro., established in 1870. 
They employ from twelve to fifteen hands in this department 
and the manufacture of blank books and paper boxes. The 
building devoted to this business is two stories, 30 x 60 feet 
in size. This firm have long been engaged in the book and 
stationery trade in Richmond and have a first-class establish- 
ment. 

Cain's Lumber Yard. — In 1872 W, E. Dulin commenced 
the lumber business at the southeast corner of Eleventh and 
Main streets. In 1878 he sold out to William Cain, who 
still continues the business. He has two yards, one at the 
corner of Eleventh and Main streets, and the other on 
Eleventh Street, both having an area of 33,000 feet. The 
amount of lumber handled is over 3,000,000 feet annually, 

Gary, Rowlett & Co., 1100 JVorth E Street.— ^\\\% firm 
began business Jan, 1, 1881:, The firm consists of Alonzo 
Cary, O, B, Rowlett and Henry Farmer, They manufacture 
the check-rower (for use in planting corn) and the Hamilton 
corn-planter. Mr, Farmer is the patentee of both of these 
inventions. The planter was manufactured exclusively by 
the Farmer Manufacturing Company during 1880 and 1881. 
Messrs. Cary and Rowlett were engaged in the manufacture 
of sash, doors and blinds from 1877 until 1884, The firm 
now employ about a dozen men, and are making a specialty 
of the check-rower. 



CITY OF EICHMOND. 



69 



Champion Roller MiUing Co.—Hhi^ was organized as a 
stock company July 1, 1883. The building used is a three and a 
half story brick. It was erected in 1877, designed as a mill for 
the manufacture of linseed oil, and was used for that purpose 
by the company, Kendall, Barnes & Co., until July 1, 1882, 
when thetirm was changed to Kendall, Eeeves & Co., who 
continued until 1883. Then the company formed and 
arranged for the manufacture of flour under the new patent 
process. The mill is now in successful operation, with a 
capacity of 200 barrels every twenty-four hours. The machin- 
ery is run by a steam engine of sixty horse-power. About 
fourteen hands are employed. The Directors of the company 
are : Jas. E. Beeves, F. M. Clark and Arthur Eeeves, the 
former being President, and the latter Secretary and 
Treasurer. 

Champion Roller Skate and Wagon Company. — This 
company began business in January, 1884, and was incorpo- 
rated Feb. 6, 1884, with a capital stock of $15,000. J. F. 
Reeves is President of the company; Eeuben Mysick, Secre- 
tary and Treasurer; and J. Y. Rowlett, Manager. Thev 
manufacture the J. V. Eowlett patent Champion roller skates 
and children's toy wagons patented by J. Y. Eowlett. The 
manufactory is located at 1122 North E street. 

Chase Piano Company. — The manufacture of pianos as 
now carried on, and the high reputation the pianos have 
gained, have been a source of pride to the city of Eichmond 
for the past five years. The Trayer Piano Company was 
started in June, 1875, with George Trayer as President, and 
Eichard Jackson as Secretary and Treasurer. The company 
continued for three years with limited means, but with an 
improving business, which gave assurance of success, as only 
increased capital was needed. This was secured in September, 
1878, when the present company was formed with a capital 
stock of $100,000, of which $87,000 was paid in and the 
Chase Piano Company became the successor of Trayer Piano 
Company. The company secured twenty-three acres of 
ground and the finest water-power on the Whitewater. 
Their factory is a large four-story building, and such addi- 
tions as needed, all covering a space of 70,000 square feet. 



70 HISTORY OF WAYNE COUNTY. 

The}' commenced business by turning out one piano a week, 
but, in 1882, they employed 125 hands, and paid out $55,000 
in wages. The past year, 1883, 150 hands, all skilled work- 
men, have been employed, and their labor account exceeded 
$65,000. The company have six patents secured, and issued 
to M. J. Chase, a skilled mechanic, whose inventive genius 
is still at work. The Chase piano is now rapidly coming 
into use as inferior to none, and standing in the front rank 
of musical instruments. The present officers of the company 
are: James M. Starr, President; Chas. F. Coffin, Vice-presi- 
dent; Benj. Starr, Secretary and Treasurer; and M. J. Chase, 
Business Manager. 

Chtirch^ School and Office Furniture. — These works, 
Haynes, Spencer & Co., proprietors, probably the most exten- 
sive in the West, had a small beginning in 1866 by John Allen. 
Later, G. H, Grant became a partner, then owner, and took 
in with him Joshua Nickerson and William Wootin. Their 
business was small, and their factory was a small frame build- 
ing, of about 1,700 square feet of space, which served as 
finishing-room, salesroom and office combined. In 1871 T. 
W. Haynes purchased William Wootin's one-third interest. 
That year they purchased ground, to erect works of their 
own. In 1873 Grant & Haynes purchased Nickerson's inter- 
est, and then sold the same to William F. Spencer. The 
partnership thus formed continued for five years when Grant 
sold his interest to his remaining partners. Messrs. Haynes and j 
Spencer then formed a joint stock company, with a capital of 
$75,000, with T. W. Haynes as President, and William F.j 
Spencer, Secretary and Treasurer. They have one building, 80 
X 25, and another 60 x 55, four stories high. Their mill was 
burned in July, 1881, with a loss of $35,000, and insurance of 
$17,000. A new building was erected, four stories high, 100 x 
45 feet, and an L, 80x50 feet, and completed within eighty days. 
Another fire the same year destroyed about $5,000 worth of 
furniture. The past year, 1883, a purchase ot ground was 
made and a four story brick building was erected, 60 x 140, 
and a foundry, brick, 60 x 130. They have now about 100,- 
000 feet of floor room, employ 200 hands, and do a business 



CITY OF RICHMOND. 71 

of $250,000 per annum. Their goods are to be found in almost 
every civilized country. The present Vice-President is Charles 
H. Coffin. 

City Carriage Works.— ll\i\^ factory, located at 7, 9 and 11 
South Sixth street, was established in 1857, by S. B. Lippin- 
cott. After several changes of owners it was purchased in 
1877 by Philip Schneider, the present proprietor. The main 
baildino^ is two stories, 40 x 80 feet. A ^ three-story buildino-, 
25 X 50 feet, is also occupied by the works. From twenty to 
twenty-five men are employed. Phaetons, carriages, buggies 
and spring wagons are manufactured. 

City Mill Works. — These works were founded Aug. 22,1876 , 
by Joseph G. Lemon. Shortly afterward a stock company, 
styled the Richmond City Mill Works, was formed. The 
officers were Christian Fetta, President; IS^athaniel W. Briggs, 
Secretary and Treasurer; and. C. F. Walters, Manager ; Di- 
rectors: A. E. Crocker, N. W. Briggs, J. G. Lemon, C. F. 
Walters, Christian Fetta and James M. Starr. The company 
purchased the property of the Malleable Iron Works, which 
had succumbed to a financial disaster, and added to it both 
large and valuable improvements. Opening in the fall of 
1876, they have been progressive and prosperous. They are 
giving employment to 125 hands, have a 100 horse-power 
engine to run their machinery, and manufacture exclusively 
flouring-mill machinery. Their sales in Indiana and adjoin- 
ing States exceed $300,000 per aimum. Present officers are: 
J. G. Lemon, President; L. T. Lemon, Secretary and Treas- 
urer, and C. F. Walters, Manager of the works. The dimen- 
sions of the buildings occupied by the works are as follows: 
Main building, 60 x 150 feet, with a wing of the same size ; 
stone shop, 60 x 100 ; foundry, 50 x 60; blacksmith shop, 40 
x 50 ; wood-working shop, 32 x 100. 

Coffin Works.~Tl\e coffin works of Ezra Smith & Co. are 
as widely known as any other manufacturing institution in 
the city of Richmond. The business when started in the 
fifties was a sash, door and blind factory, owned by Jno. 
Hillowpeter, and in 1859 he was succeeded by Ezra Smith & 
Co. They continued the business, including lumber and 
building material, until Jan. 1, 1872, when an incorporation 



72 HISTORY OF WAYNE COUNTY. 

was effected, with a capital stock of $50,000, and the coffia 
works became a fixed fact. The success of the company has 
been scarcely paralleled by any single business interest in the 
city. It has increased its resources to a paid-up capital ot 
$100,000. On the organization of the company new build- 
ings were erected, consisting of a four-story brick, in all 
covering a working space of 48,000 square feet. Their engine 
is of forty-five horse-power, and sixty hands are employed in 
their business, which now extends to every part of the Union. 

Dunham & Co.'s Lumber Tard.—E. B. & G. H. Dunham, 
under the firm name of E. B. Dunham & Co., engaged in the 
lumber business at 513 :N"orth Twelfth street, in 1868, and 
have since conducted a large business. They also carry on 
extensive lumbering operations in the State of Tennessee, and 
send their products to almost every part of the Union. 

Empire Steel Flow Works. — The manufacture of steel plows 
was commmenced in 1832 by Solomon and David S. Horney. 
About eight years later Solomon Horney became sole propri- 
etor, and so continued until 1848, when he was again joined 
by D. S. Horney, who remained in the business until 1850. 
Solomon Horney continued alone until 1852, when he took 
George McCullough into partnership. In 1853 Elwood Pat- 
terson became a partner. Tliese three, under the firm name 
of S. Horney & Co., continued business until 1876, when 
Horney retired. McCullough also withdrew two years later, 
and Elwood Patterson has since been sole proprietor 

The early business was carried on on a small scale, but the 
establishment now takes rank among the first in the city. At 
first, cast and steel plows were manufactured, but for the past 
thirty-four years steel plows exclusively have been made. 
The factory was originally on the corner of Fort Wayne and 
Washington avenues, but since 1867 has been in its present 
location, 283 Fort Wayne avenue. The shops occupy an area 
of 17,000 square feet. About twenty men are regularly em- 
ployed, and about 4,000 plows made annually. 

Fleecy Dale Woolen- Mills.— Th^ site of this mill, on the 
East Fork of the Whitewater, was first occupied by a 
saw-mill. In 1825 Benjamin Hibberd bought the site and 
established a woolen-mill. About 1849 the property was pur- 



CITY OF RICHMOND. |YS^ 

chased of Mr. Hibberd bj Benjamin Bond and Alpheus Test 
and operated by them several years. Samuel Nixon and 
Ezekiel Aikin were the next owners and carried on business- 
until 1867, when Ezekiel Aiken and Samuel Porter became 
proprietors. This firm continued to do business until 1878 
under the name E. Aiken & Co. Mr. Aiken then became 
sole proprietor. He died in 1881, and the business has since 
been conducted by his heirs. The main building is of wood, 
three stories high, T-shaped, containing an area of about 
12,000 square feet. There is also an addition, two stories 
high, 18x36 feet. Tiiemill is provided with new machinery. 
A large amount of weaving was formerly done, but at pres- 
ent the manufacture of yarn is the principal work. 

James W. Moore is a son of David and grandson of Alex- 
ander Moore, who was a lineal descendant of Irish ancestors, 
and married Jane Horn an. David Moore was born in 
Uniontown, Pa., Oct. 6,1811, and was left an orphan at an 
early age, with little means. He had an innate love of knowl- 
edge, and by self application, with little assistance, acquired a 
good education. He came to Wayne County in an early day 
and for several years taught school; subsequently engaged 
in the mercantile business in Centreville. In 1847 he lo- 
cated in Connersville, Ind., where he was soon after elected 
Secretary of the Whitewater Canal Company, serving until 
his death, Feb. 12, 1852. He left a widow and four children. 
— Jacob K,., of Indianapolis; Emma J. Riqhardson, of Cincin- 
nati, Ohio; James W. and Martha E. Gossett, of Indianapo- 
lis. His wife, to whom he was married Sept. 21, 1837, was 
Catharine, daughter of Elijah Fisher, an early settler of 
Centreville. Elijah Fisher was born in Kentucky about 1782,, 
and about 1800 married Nancy Meek, daughter of Jacob- 
Meek, of Kentucky. In 1804, with his wife and one child, he 
came to Wayne County, Ind., his wife riding a horse and he 
walking all the way. They located near Kichmond where he- 
carried on farming. After his permanent settlement, his 
parents and nine other children joined him in Wayne County. 
He was the father of ten children— Jacob, John, Jennings, 
Nancy, Permelia, Betsey, Effie, Catherine, Ronan and' 
Martha. Although a member of no church he favored the 
6 



74: HISTORY OF WAYNE COUNTY. 

Baptist church, in which he was reared. He died in 
Centreville in 1852. Of his children, four girls — Permelia, 
Catherine, Ronan and Martha — are living. Pertnelia, now the 
widow of Tliomas Gentry, resides in Centreville and believes 
herself the eldest native-born resident of the county. James 
W. Moore was born in Centreville, Sept. 2, 1844. He was 
reared in his native county, and in Greenfield, Ind., where he 
obtained a fair education. He returned to Centreville in 
1866, and in April, 1871, was appointed Deputy Clerk ot 
Wayne Circuit Court, serving under Colonel W. W. Dudley 
until January, 1876, when he was appointed Clerk to fill an un- 
expired term. In the fall of the same year he was elected to 
the office by the Republican party and served till the fall ot 
1880. Since then he has been engaged in the Quaker City 
Chair Factory. He was married to Louise J. Rupe, a native 
of Economy, Ind., born Feb. 5, 1850, a daughter of Henry 
B. and Jane Rupe. They have three children — Henry A., 
Emma R. and Nellie L. 

Fry Brothers Sash and Door Factory. — In 1875 H. Cad- 
wallader & Co. began the business at present carried on by 
this firm. It included the manufacture of doors, sash, blinds, 
frames, moldings, desks and pumps. The business was 
carried on by the above firm three years, when the present 
proprietors succeeded. In 1880 the firm changed to Fry & 
Hadley, but in 1881 the name became Fry Brothers. The 
firm consists of James E. and C. A, Fry. They employ fif- 
teen men on an average and occupy 18,215 square feet of 
room. The factory is located at 17 and 19 South Eleventh 
street. 

Fulton Boiler Works. — These works were established by 
their present proprietor, Jerry Co whig, in 1876. The shops, 
located north of the Union depot, are 45 x 110 feet in size. 
Employment is given to from twenty to twenty-five hands and 
every kind of steam boiler and sheet iron work is manufact- 
ured. 

Gaar, Scott d; Co. — The extensive establishment of this 
company stands foremost among the many industrial interests 
of Richmond, and is among the leading manufactories of the 
kind in the country. The works, and the wide reputation 



CITY OF RICHMOND. ^^5 

which their products have gained, have been largely instru- 
mental in adding to the industrial greatness of Richmond. 

In 1836 Isaac E. Jones commenced the manufacture of 
stoves in a building which now stands on the corner of Sixth 
and North F streets, to which location it was removed in 
1856 to make room for a machine shop. Three years la- 
ter (1839) Jesse M. and John H. Hutton became the owners. 
They enlarged and renovated the establishment and called it 
the Spring Foundry. In 1841 they made the first threshing 
machine ever built in Indiana. It was of the style known 
as the "chaff piler ." Messrs. Hutton managed the business 
until 1849 and then sold to Jonas Gaar, Abram Gaar, 
John M. Gaar and William G. Scott, who, in 1852, began the 
manufacture of threshers. These gentlemen conducted the 
business under the firm name of A. Gaar & Co. until April 
1, 18Y0, when the firm of Gaar, Scott & Co. was incorporated, 
with a capital of $400,000. From a modest beginning, their 
business at the above date had grown to about |350,000 per 
year and employed 200 hands. In 1874 the company was 
reorganized under the same name with a capital of $350,000. 
The present capital is the same. The present officers of the 
company are Abram Gaar, President; Joseph B. Craijhhead, 
Yice- President; Wm. G. Scott, Secretary; Jno. Milton Gaar, 
Treasurer. 

The establishment now occupies nearly nine acres of ground 
and fifteen buildings, with a floor room amounting to several 
acres. The principal buildings are as follows: Main building, 
four stories, brick, 40x150 feet, T-shaped; machine shop, 50 x 
190 feet, three stories, brick ; molding room, 50 x 140 feet ; 
boiler- shops, brick, 138x110 and 38x120 feet; blacksmith 
shop, 40x90 feet; supply room, 30x70 feet; engine house, 
30x70 feet; warehouses, one a three-story, brick, with slate 
roof— size, 50x200 feet; and thefothers, 60x100 feet, and 
40 X 70 feet. The works are fitted throughout with the best 
of machinery, which is driven by a steam engine of 250 horse- 
power. The company manufactures portable engines of every 
kind, plain and traction, and steam and horse-power threshing 
machines. The separators made by Gaar, Scott & Co. were 
awarded first premiums in 1860, by the United States Agri- 
cultural Society, and at the Centennial Exhibition of 1876. 



76 HISTORY OF WAYNE COUNTY. 

They have also taken numerous premiums at State fairs, as 
have also the engines made by this company. The machines 
are in use in nearly all of the States and Territories of the 
United States, as well as in Sweden, Russia, and other for- 
eign countries. The number of engines made in 1883 was 
540; number of threshing machines, 500. 

About 400 men are constantly employed, and the pay-roll 
amounts to $250,000 yearly. No interest of this section ot 
the State is more substantial and prosperous, and none has 
merited greater prosperity. 

Oraiii Elevator. — The Depot Grain Elevator was estab- 
lished by Mitchell & Benson prior to 1861. This firm was 
succeeded by Bush & Co. about 1870 and by H. M. Van 
Frank in 1874, who enlarged the buildings and carried on a 
larger business. The main building is three stories, 60 x 120 
feet. Mr. Van Frank failed in 1883. 

Grant <& Hemplemaii, manufacturers of church and school 
furniture. This firm was organized in 1878, and has since 
conducted a very prosperous business. Their manufactory 
now ranks among the leading enterprises of the city. Geo. 
H. Grant, the senior member of the firm, was the first to en- 
gage in the manufacture of this kind of furniture in Rich- 
mond, where he has been in business almost constantly since 
1865. Mr. Hempleman has also been in the same business 
for a long time. The firm make and sell over thirty different 
styles of church furniture and thirteen of school furniture. 
Their products are in use in more than twenty States of the 
Union, and are unsurpassed in style and quality. 

Green Street Mills. — The present building was erected in 
1864, by Marmon, Nordyke & Co., and is seven stories high, 
30 x36 feet. It has a fine water-power and also a steam at- 
tachment, which was added in the spring of 1883. The build- 
ing was first occupied by H. C. Wright as aflouring-milluntil 
1876, when it was purchased by C. G. Carpenter. Originally 
the mill started with four run of burrs, and this continued 
until 1883. In the spring of that year the mill was renovated 
and provided with improved machinery of the patent roller 
process, and is now one of the most complete flouring estab- 
lishments in the State. There is $25,000 of invested capital. 



CITY OF RICHMOND. 77 

The builders of this mill started the business as early as 1855, 
but on leasing the building as above removed from the citv. 

Eames arid Chain TTory^s. —These works were first started 
as early as 1832, on a small scale, by Wm. Cunningham, and 
carried on by hand. Since that time the business has changed 
hands several times, finally becoming the property of W. C. 
Starr, in the year 1866. The business had grown considerably 
during all those years, was carried on by steam, and was 
located on Smith street, near Pearl. 

In 1872 Mr. Starr removed to his present location, having 
erected a two-story brick building, 60x74, and a one-story 
back-shop, 58 x 67 feet in size. The chain works were added 
in 1875, and the business has now assumed much importance. 
The works are conducted by W. C. Starr & Son, employing 
sixty-five hands and a motive power of forty-horse steam-en- 
gine. 

Rooster Drill Company. — The manufacture of the Hoosier 
drills was began by Joseph Ingels at Milton, Wayne County, 
in 1857, under patents of his own. He continued until 1867, 
when a stock company was formed, which continued until 
1873, when it was re-organized, J. M. "Wescott becoming the 
principal stockholder. They manufacture grain drills, corn 
drills, hay rakes and broad-cast seeders. These articles have 
a wide-spread reputation and the demand is ahead of the 
supply. 

The works were removed from Milton to Richmond in 
1878, where during the year large and greatly improved works 
had been erected, which were taken possession of in October 
of the same year. Since then additions to the works have been 
made rendering them still more complete in every respect for 
the more perfect and rapid manufacture of their wares. The 
latest addition was a new engine-house and a fine engine 
of 150 horse-power. The buildings constituting the 
works are four in number, or the main building and addi- 
tions. The main building is 50 x 350 feet, and four stories 
high; a wing loO x 50 feet, same height; foundry, etc., 130 x 
80, one story high, and another building same, 85 x 50 feet. 

The ofiicers of the company are: J. M. Westcott, Presi- 
dent: F. A. Wilke, Secretary; O. HoUingsworth, Treasurer, 



78 HISTOEY OF WAYNE COUNTY. 

and J. A. Carr, Superintendent, all stockholders in the com- 
pany. The capital stock when incorporated was $60,000 
but is now represented by a much larger capital. It is one 
of the largest and most prosperous manufacturing interests 
of the city. 

Ice Dealing. — This business, from a very humble begin- 
ning, has grown to important proportions. It was begun 
in 1837 or 1838 by Irvin Reed, who at the time was en- 
gaged in the drug business, near the corner of Sixth and 
Main. The demand for ice for use in case of sickness proba- 
bly led him to engage in the business. He kept the ice in 
his'cellar and sold it at about three " bits " per bushel. He 
continued the business for more than a decade, occasionally 
making small shipments to Knightstown and other points. 
During this time he brought the first fresh oysters to Rich- 
mond by stage from Baltimore. About the same time a 
Frenchman named Bouche kept a saloon and did a small busi- 
ness in ice and oysters. William Mashmyer, A. Lewis, J. 
W. Chandler and others afterward dealt in ice on a small 
scale. Lewis increased the business, and was succeeded by 
John Hawkins, after two or three years, who carried it on 
more extensively. 

In 1864 J. W. Brannon and Charles Live started in tlie 
business and leased the Thistlewaite Pond. They put up 
about 500 tons per year at that time. In 1877 the present 
firm, Hawkins & Brannon, was organized, consisting of David 
Hawkins, son of John Hawkins, above named, and J. W. 
Brannon. The firm now sell about 8,000 tons yearly, which 
is delivered in all parts of the city. They employ eight or 
ten hands and four delivery wagons. 

Iron Fence Manufacture. — Samuel Marlatt commenced a 
general blacksmithing business at No. 123 Fort Wayne ave- 
nue in 1877. He is now principally engaged in the manufact- 
ure of iron fences, railings, shutters, doors, etc., both of plain 
and fancy designs. 

Liberty Avenue Flour Mills. — This mill was erected in 
1868 by Leroy M. and Lafayette Larsh, and at first called the 
Canal Mills. In 1874 L. M. Larsh retired and Corwin S. 
Larsh became a partner, the firm becoming Lafe Larsh & 



• CITY OF RICHMOND. 79 

Bro. The mill is 46 x 50 feet and has a capacity for manufact- 
uring eighty barrels of flour psr day of twenty-four hours. 

Malleable Iron Worhs were started in 1871, by E. D. 
Palmer and H. H. Fetta. They were operated only a few 
years. 

Main Street Brewery. ~-ThQ main building of the present 
Main Street Brewery was started by Christian Buhl, who es- 
tablished a brewery in Eichmond as early as 1830. In 1869 it 
was purchased at sheriff's sale by Emil Minck, its present pro- 
prietor. Mr. Minck has made several improvements and car- 
ries on quite an extensive business. His son, Emil Minck, Jr., 
is associated with him in the management of the establishment. 

Poi'k Packing. — This establishment was commenced in the 
winter of 1853-4, by William Wiggins and William S. Reid, 
for buying and slaughtering pork. On the death of Mr. 
Wiggins, soon after, Jeremy Mansur joined Mr. Reid. Man- 
sur & Reid carried on the business until 1861 or 1862, when 
Mr. Mansur retired, and G. W. Yanneman, C. C. Beeler and 
John P. Smith became partners of Mr. Reid, since which time 
the business has been continued under the firm name of Van- 
neman, Reid & Co. In 1867 this establishment took the 
name of " Charter Oak Pork House.'''' It has the capacity to 
slaughter and take care of about 900 hogs a day, or about 
20,000 in a season, lasting about twenty days. The average 
number actually handled within the last three years, prior to 

1870, was about 14,000 a year, and the value of the pork annu- 
ally slaughtered and sold, about $250,000. This establish- 
ment was once destroyed by fire, but was promptly rebuilt. 
Nearly 20,000 were slaughtered in 1870, and in the season of 

1871, 20,638. In 1874 it was the third in size in the State of 
Indiana, with the credit of packing the heaviest average hogs in 
the State . In 1875 the present firm of Reid, Beeler & Co. be- 
came the owners, the firm being W. S. Reid, C. C. Beeler, John 
P. Smith and E. G. Hibberd. They have all the new improved 
and necessary machinery for their business with a capacity of 
1,000 hogs per day. Their works and yards cover six acres. 

Quaker City Chair Works were established by W. B. 
Hadley and Theodore Newman, on South Eleventh street, in 
1879. In 1880 James W. Moore became a pal-tner under the 



8Q HISTORY OF WAYNE COUNT i'. • 

above name. Double cane-seat chairs are a specialty. Of 
all kinds, about forty patents are made, including tlie perfo- 
rated-seated chairs. They employ thirty-three hands and 
also have a large repair shop, from whicli they give out 
work to a large number outside. They are doing a prosper- 
ous business of over $10,000 a year and improving. Theo- 
dore Newman is the manager, with a practical knowledge ot 
the business in all its branches. 

Quaker City Mill. — This mill is located just outside of the 
city limits, on the New Paris pike, and is now owned by 
F. H. Stafford. It is one of the oldest mill-sites in the State, 
a landmark of olden times, well-known to the pioneers who 
came from far and near to secure its services in turning their 
corn into meal and wheat into flour. Customers patronized 
the "Moffitt Mill," for it was known as such as far west as 
Indianapolis and north to Ft. Wayne. Charles Moffitt ^uilt the 
first mill in 1815. It was repaired and renewed and changed 
owners several times. It ^ was built of solid hewn-oak logs 
and remained standing with its additions and repairs until 
April 9, 1883, when it was destroyed by fire. The then 
and present owner, F. H. Stafford, erected upon the old site 
a substantial brick structure at a cost of $6,000 and furnished 
it with all the latest and best mill machinery. It is run by wa- 
ter-power. The original dam remained intact until 1873, when 
it was replaced by the present one. The old site has been 
owned and the mill operated in the past seventy years as fol- 
lows: First came Chas. Moffitt, then his son Hiiofh became 
the next owner. Benj. Fulghum purchased a half interest, 
and the firm was Moffitt & Fulghum. The next firm was 
Kenworthy & Fulghum, Wm. Kenworthy purchasing Moffitt's 
interest. Then came Kenworthy & Son, Jesse Kenworthy 
purchasing Fulghum's interest. Ezra Hill and Henry Weth- 
erell bought out the Kenworthys, and Ezra Hill, in turn, 
bought out his partner. Then, in 1871, the present proprie- 
tor became half owner which continued until 1879, when Mr. 
Stafford purchased his partner's interest and became sole pro- 
prietor. He failed in 1881. 

Richmond Caster Works. — These works were started by 
an incorporated'company, with a capital stock of $15,000 on 



CITY OF RICHMOND. ' gl 

Maj 9, 1881. Since then the capital has been doubled and 
all paid in. This increase was made May 12, 1883. They 
control two patents ot H. Ogborn, the first bein^ issued 
April 9, 1881, and the second March 6, 1883. They are 
both furniture casters. The latter the company manufactures 
exclusively. A grain-drill caster, patented by S. C. Menden- 
hall, and reissued by Harrison Ogborn Nov. 22, 1881, is 
also controlled by this company. Present officers: Jas. M. 
Starr, President; H. Ogborn, Yice-President; C. B. Hunt, 
Secretary; Benj. Starr, Treasurer. The rapid extension of 
their business will again require a further addition to the 
capital stock in the near future. 

Richmond Chair Company. — The original chair- works, 
started by Wm. Crawford in 1877, were sold by him in 1881 
to H. D. Bond, who was succeeded in the same year by J. E. 
Thomas and Daniel Surface. This firm continued business 
until 1883 when Mr. Surface took entire charge. The Kich- 
raond Chair Company is an incorporated body, with a large 
capital. They make forty styles of chairs, many of which 
are patented. Their buildings are a two-story frame structure, 
50 X 105 feet, and a three-story brick building, 40 x 60 feet. The 
company do an extensive business, employing about fifty-five 
hands. Their establishment ranks among the leading interests 
of tins section. The works are located on the southwest cor- 
ner of Thirteenth and North E streets. 

Richmond City Mills. — About the year 1825 Thomas New- 
man erected a grist-mill on the West Fork. About 1853 Thomas 
Hunt purchased the property from Newman's heirs. It was 
afterward owned by Timothy Thistlewaite and then by Davis 
Bush, who, in 1869, remodeled, enlarged and improved it. In 
1877 Thomas and John Hunt became tlie owners, and are 
still carrying on business under the firm name of Hunt & 
Brother. The mill is four-stories high, 60 x 100 feet. It has 
been improved from time to time and provided with first-class 
machinery. Its capacity is about 100 barrels of flour every 
twenty-four hours. Large shipments are made to Eastern 
cities. 

Richmond Machine' Worhs were originally established in 
1860 by Bayleis, Yaughan & Co. and continued by them until 



82. • HISTORY OF WAYNE COUNTY. 

1872, when it became an incorporated company with a capital 
stock of $100,000, under the same name and stockholders, 
and in 1882, ten years later, assumed the name at the head of 
this article. Jos. M. Bayleis, as President, and And. Vaughan, 
Secretary, were the first officers of the company in 1872, and 
the former was succeeded by B. P. Perry, a leading stock- 
holder in the company, in July of the same year. Mr. Perry 
is still President. In 1874 Mr. Yaughan retired from the 
secretaryship, and Mr. L. H. Bunyan assumed the office and 
still holds it. 

Their work embraces saw-mills, engines, tile-mills and gen- 
eral work manufactured in such establishments. They have a 
forty horse-power steam-engine and employ an average of 
fifty hands throughout the year. The buildings composing 
their extensive works are as follows: 

Finishing room 40 x 80 feet. 

Blacksmith shop . 25 x 50 " 

Foundry 50 x 100 " 

Wood-work shop 30 x 60 " 

Another of same 40 x 60 " 

Pattern shop 40 x 40 " 

Pattern room < .40 x 60 " 

Wood-work room 30 x 60 " 

Richmond Payer-Mills. — The question of establishing a 
paper-mill in Richmond received attention as early as 1827, and 
in a copy of the Public Ledger of that year it is announced 
that "Mr. Smith is progressing finely with his paper-mill." 
The death of the projector in 1828 caused the work to be sus- 
pended, but in 1830 a paper-mill was put in operation by 
Leeds & Jones, with John Eastou, Superintendent. The mill 
afterward passed into the possession of the Richmond Manu- 
facturing and Trading Company, and afterward Nixon Bro- 
thers became the owners. The mill was destroyed by fire 
about 1871 but was rebuilt. The mills are now owned by 
Thomas Nixon. The capacity is 3,000 pounds of paper per 
day. Twenty-five hands are employed. The motive power 
is furnished by three steam engines, amounting to eighty-six 
horse-power, and a forty horse-power water-wheel. The es- 
tablishment occupies several acres of ground, and manufact- 



CITY OF RICHMOND. 83 

ures manilla, roll-bag and wrapping paper. The dimensions 
of the buildings are as follows: 30 x 60 feet, three stories; 
20x30, three stories; 24x60; 24x100; 25x30; 40x40, three 
stories; 20 x 20; oiling sheds, 20 x 40, and carpenter shop, 
16 x 40. 

In 1853 Timothy Thistlewaite, Miles J. Shinn and Joseph 
C. Ratliff started a paper-mill and operated it for some time. 
It was afterward run bv Mr. Thistlewaite, who discontinued 
the manufacture of paper and added the power to that of his 
grist-mill. 

Richmond Tannery and Collar Works. — In 1859 Job and 
Arthur A. Curme, under the firm name of Curme & Son, 
started a small tannery one-fourth of a mile north of the city 
limits. At the end of four years Job Curme retired and was suc- 
ceeded by Isaac D. Dunn, when the tannery was removed to 
its present location. In 1868 another partner was admitted 
and the firm became Curme, Dunn & Co. In 1874 the con- 
cern was incorporated with a capital of $100,000, with A. A. 
Curme, President ; I. D. Dunn, Yice-President, and J. J. 
Harrington, Secretary and Treasurer. In 1877 the buildings 
were burned, but they were at once rebuilt on a more exten- 
sive scale. The firm owned two squares on North Third, 
between C and D streets, on which are one brick building, two 
stories high, 50 x 300 feet, two bark houses, two main build- 
ings, etc. About sixty hands were employed. The tannery 
has a capacity of 200 hides per week, and the manufac- 
tory of horse-collars is the largest in the State. The firm 
failed in 1883 and the property is now in the hands of an 
assignee. 

Richmond Valley Mills. — These mills were destroyed 
by fire in 1883. The original of the establishment was 
a pioneer chopping-mill and grist-mill. It was owned by 
John Underwood as early as 1830, and was afterward con- 
verted into a woolen-mill by Bancroft, as already stated. 
After many changes of owners and considerable improve- 
ments, the property was bought in 1856 by Jacob Mering, 
who in 1857 sold it to Luther M. Mering, its last owner. 
Under Mr. Mering's management a large milling business 
was carried on, and about 20,000 barrels of flour made 



84 HISTORY OF WAYNE COUNTY. 

yearly. The buildino^ was 40 x 60 feet, and four and a half 
stories high. 

Richmond Woolen Mills. — This mill was established by 
Alpheus Test in 1856. It was on one of the oldest mill- 
sites in the county. The water privilege was Urst used 
for a grist-mill and saw- mill by Atticus Siddall and 
Edward Wright. In 1856 Mr. Test bought the site 
and erected a frame building for a woolen-mill. In 1858 
the building and contents burned, involving a loss of 
$10,000. In the spring of 1859 he erected the present fac- 
tory, a brick building 30 x 60 feet. In 1865 Alpheus Test sold 
the property to William, Rufus, Oliver and Lindley M. Test. 
L. M. Test sold his interest a year later, and the other three 
brothers conducted the business until February, 1882, when 
William and Rufus Test became sole proprietors. In 1866 
the mill was damaged by fire to the extent of $15,000, but 
was at once remodeled. In 1868 a stone dye-house, 25 x 50 feet, 
was erected, and in 1871 a large stone building, 50 x 100 feet, 
was erected, and is used for carding and spinning rooms. The 
firm employs from fifteen to seventeen operatives, and uses 
about 75,000 pounds of wool per year. 

A woolen-mill was established in 1865 by Richard Jackson 
and Elias H. Swain, on the site of the old Cox grist-mill. A 
little later Henry C. Dunn was admitted to partnership, the 
firm becoming Jackson, Swain & Dunn. They had for a 
factory a five-story wooden building, and gave employment 
to about seventy-five persons. The mill was destroyed by 
fire in 1871. 

The Rohinson Machine Works were founded in 1842 
by Francis W. Robinson. He was born in Baltimore, 
Dec. 9, 1810, removed to Wilmington, Del., and thence 
to Philadelphia, where he remained until his nineteenth 
year, during which time he learned the trade of a house- 
carpenter and builder. In 1829 he moved to Indiana 
bringing with him his youngest sister. He settled in Rich- 
mond in the year 1833 or 1834, and followed his trade until 
the year 1842, when he commenced business on the present 
site of the Robinson Machine Works, in a small way, running 
the establishment by a horse-power which had formerly been 



CITY OF RICHMOND. 35 

used by Kobert Morrisson and Daniel P. Wiggins for grind- 
ing bark. 

The popular threshing machines of that day were called 
"chaif pilers," and "traveling threshing machines," but 
neither kind separated the grain from the chaff. After a few- 
years Mr. R. bought out Edward Borton & Son (then en- 
gaged in the same business), and began the manufacture of 
"traveling separators," and shortly substituted steam for 
horse-power, and began the building of improved threshers 
and separators with separate horse-powers. About 1860 he 
commenced manufacturing portable farm engines and 
" Pitt's " separators, having patented some valuable improve- 
ments making them successful "grain-saving" machines and 
rapid threshers. 

Up to 1858 lie was sole proprietor, and was his own super- 
intendent, foreman, book-keeper, collector and salesman, when 
Jonas W. Yeo, his son-in-law, became associated with him. 
Afterward R. H. Shoemaker purchased an interest in the 
business, and in 1872 the works were incorporated under the 
name of the "Robinson Machine Works," the incorporators 
being F. W. Robinson, Jonas W. Yeo, R. H. Shoemaker and 
R. H. Swift. In 1872 H. E. Robinson, son of F. W. Robin- 
son, bought the interest of R. H. Shoemaker. In 1877 the 
affairs of the incorporated company were wound up, and in 
1878 the firm of Robinson & Co. came into possession of the 
works, and the firm of Robinson & Co. is now composed of 
Francis W. Robinson and Henry E. Robinson. 

The machinery now built at the works is protected by 
numerous patents, being the inventions and improvements of 
F. W. Robinson, including a patent steam-engine governor, 
patent revolving straw-stacker, patent clover attachment to 
threshing machines, and numerous patents for improvements 
in threshers, engines, etc. 

They manufacture steam-engines, boilers, threshers, horse- 
powers, saw-mills, drag-saws, etc. 

The works comprise a machine shop, carpenter shop, wood- 
working shop, boiler shop, smith shop, foundry and tw^o 
warehouses. The motive power is a steam-engine of fifty 
horse-power. 



86 HISTORY OF WAYNE COUNTY. 

Since ISVS Robinson & Co. have added to the real estate 
by purchase of a lot on Main street, 60 x 150 feet, on which is 
their commodious three-story brick office building; a lot on 
North Third street, 60 x 145, adjoining the shops on the north, 
to be occupied by a three- story brick warehouse; also three 
lots on ISTorth Third street for storing lumber, etc. The capac- 
ity of the works is about $150,000 per year in product. The 
machinery made is in use in almost every State in the Union, 
but more especially in Indiana, Kentucky, Ohio, Michigan, 
Wisconsin, Illinois and Missouri. 

Saddlery and Collar Manufactory. — This business is car- 
ried on by Wiggins & Co., at 509 Main street. It was begun 
many years ago by D. P. Wiggins and continued by his 
sons, a tannery then being operated in connection with it. 
In 1872 was formed the present firm of Wiggins & Co., con- 
sisting of Charles O. Wiggins, George Wiggins and Frank 
Wiggins. The original building on the present site was 
erected by D. P. Wiggins in 1835. The present building is 
of brick, three and one-half stories high, 20 x 100 feet. The 
first floor contains the office and salesroom; the second, a 
stock of trunks and valises; and the third floor is devoted to 
saddlery and harness making, in which from eight to twelve 
men are employed. Two other buildings are used in the 
manufacture of horse-collars, in which department from fif- 
teen to twenty men are employed. The firm has a large 
wholesale trade in the Southern, Western and Northwestern 
States. 

Sashj Door and Blind Manufactory. — The sash, door and 
blind manufactory and planing mill of Wm. H. Middleton 
& Co. ranks among the leading industries of Richmond. 
The planing mill was first started in 1871 by Wm. Cain & 
Son. In 1875 the firm was T. P. Cain and J. M. Baylies, who 
were succeeded in 1879 by the present company, composed of 
Wm. H. Middleton, S. B. Williamson, H. W. Talhelm and 
August Kamp, under the firm name of Wm. H. Middleton 
& Co. They have a three-story brick building, 40 x 100 feet, 
and an engine room 20 x 30 feet, with a forty horse-power 
engine to conduct their manufacturing operations. Further 
additions will have to be made to meet the growing demands 
of their business. 



CITY OF RICHMOND. 87 

School Supplies. — The manufacture of school supplies is 
conducted by Moon & Haynes, the latter entering the part- 
nership in February, 1883. Mr. Moon is a natural mechanic 
with inventive powers of no interior order. He has taken 
out several patents for articles manufactured by the firm. 
They are conducting a successful business of $30,000 per 
year. 

Sedgwick Wire Fence Company. — The manufacture of 
wire fence was begun by Sedgwick Brothers in 1879. On 
the 5th of August of that year Isham Sedgwick secured a 
patent on a loom for weaving wire into double-twist net work. 
The loom is a most ingenious labor-saving device, and with 
its aid the fence can be made cheaply and rapidly. Buildings 
were erected in 1880 for the use of the firm and occupied in 
April. There have been additions, and the factory now com- 
prises four of the following dimensions: 40 x 60 feet, two 
stories; 25x60 feet, two stories; 42x86, four and a half 
stories; and the last, erected in 1882, 14 x 80, three stories 
high. This gives ample room. The proprietors have increased 
their business from eighty miles of fence in 1881, to 140 
miles in 1883, and their wire gates from 1,000, in round num- 
bers, in 1881, to 9,000 in 1883. They have now improved 
their machines to twenty-five times the capacity of hand labor, 
which was used exclusively in England, when the wire fence 
was first made. Each loom has a capacity of 100 rods 
daily, and six of these looms are in operation. Twenty hands 
have steady employment and steam-power is used. The ter- 
ritory in which their work is found now covers the United 
States and Canada, and their sales are only limited by the ca- 
pacity of their works. 

The Sinex Plow Company was incorporated as a joint 
stock company in 1874 with a cash capital of $8,000. The 
company is composed of William Sinex, President, John B. 
Sinex, Secretary and Treasurer; Charles Sinex and Chas. W. 
Sinex's heirs. The works of the company are at 174 and 176 
Fort Wayne avenue, and occupy two buildings covering an 
area of 2,500 feet. The company employs from fifteen to 
twenty workmen and their products are sold extensively in 
the Middle, Western and Southern States. The plow of 



88 HISTORY OF WAYNE COUNTY. 

which a specialty is made is known as the Original Empire 
plow, which has taken over thirty premiums at State fairs. 
The first plow of this kind was made by Wm. Sinex, in 1849. 
Mr. Sinex, the President of the company, is a native of Dela- 
ware and a blacksmith by trade. He located in Richmond in 
1888 and has resided in the city ever since, with the excep- 
tion of about four years. 

Spring Grove Oil Mill. — This establishment, situated one- 
fourth of a mile north of the city, dates back to 1853, when 
D. S. Bnrson and I. P. Evans erected a frame building and 
engaged in the manufacture of linseed oil. This firm con- 
tinued business until 1861 when D. S. Burson became pro- 
prietor. The following year he was succeeded by J. W. Burson 
& Co. who operated the mill until the death of J. W. Burson 
in 1871. The building was destroyed by fire in February, 
1864, but rebuilt soon after. The mill was not operated from 
1871 to 1876. In the latter year Kendall & Barnes rented 
it and carried on business until August, 1877, when the pres- 
ent proprietors, Evans, Ferguson & Reeves took charge. 
The daily capacity of the works is twenty-five barrels. Both 
steam and water power are used. Fifteen hands are em- 
ployed. The mill is superintended by T. E. Kinsey who has 
had ten years' experience in the business. 

Unio7i Carriage Factory. — This factory was established by 
Peter Crocker in 1854. The business was afterward con- 
ducted by Shute & Brandell, and Shute & Bolin, and since 
1880 by Geo. W. Bolin & Co. The building is located at 911 
and 913 Main street. It is three stories high, of brick, and 
is 23 X 116 feet. In tlie rear is a building 50 x 50 feet, which 
contains the wood-working and smith shops. The firm does 
a large business in the manufacture and sale of carriages and 
sleighs. 

Wayne Agricultural Company. — One of the foremost in- 
dustrial establishments of the State is carried on by the above 
firm. The business began in a small way in 1858, when Da- 
vis, Lawrence & Co., of "Wayne County, organized for the 
purpose of manufacturing agricultural implements. They 
made chiefly grain drills and reapers. Their business grew 
rapidly, and in 1872 an incorporated company, with a capital 



CITY OF RICHMOND. 89 

of $100,000, was formed, and the facilities ranch extended. 
In 1875 the manufactory was moved to Richmond, and the 
main building, now occupied by the company, erected on the 
northeast corner of Fifteenth and JSTortli F streets. Other 
buildings have been erected from time to time, as the needs 
of the business demanded, until now the works cover an area 
of 64,250 square feet. The main building is two stories high, 
of brick; it is L shaped, one wing being 60 x 290 feet, and 
the other 60 x 160 feet. The firm employ nearly 200 work- 
men and traveling salesmen, and pay out in salaries nearly 
$100,000 per year. Jesse P. Fulghum, who has long been in 
the employ of the company, has made many valuable im- 
provements and inventions. The last of his patents, and the 
most valuable, embodies the principles on which the Rich- 
mond Champion grain drill is constructed. All his patents 
are controlled by the Wayne Agricultural Company. Among 
the manufactures of this establishment are grain drills, the 
Richmond force-feed broadcast seeder, the Richmond Royce 
self-rake reaper, the improved Richmond mower, the Indiana 
walking cultivator. Moon's patent lever cutting box and 
the Champion corn drill. These implements are sold ex- 
tensively throughout the whole country. The officers 
of the company are: L. L. Lawrence, President; Wilh'am 
Baxter, Yice-President, and Thaddens Wright, Secretary and 
Treasurer, The establishment is the second in size and in 
importance of all the industries of the city. 

Waijne Creamery was established May 1, 1881, by G. C. 
Stevens for the Indiana Farmer Company. It was conducted 
in the interest of this company until the sum^ier of 1882, 
when it was purchased by Henry T. Burns, J. J. Russell and 
G. C. Stevens. In August, 1883, it passed into the hands of 
John G. Chandler, W. A. Howard, G. C. Stevens and C. E. 
Shute, by whom the business is now carried on. The cream- 
ery gives employment to twenty-five men, eighteen or twenty 
of whom run wagons in the country, where cream is purchased. 
The capacity of the business is 1,000 pounds of butter daily. 
The proprietors have recently added to their business a whole- 
sale house, wherethey sell foreign and domestic fruits and vege- 
7 



90 HISTORY OF WAYNE COUNTY. 

tables. The business of the company in 1883 amounted to 
$75,000. 

Whitewater Tannery. — This establishment, one of the old- 
est in the State, is the outgrowth of the two primitive tanneries 
started by John Smith and Robert Morrisson in 1818. Morris- 
son's tannery was on the site now occupied by the Robinson 
Machine Works, and Smith's was on the present location of 
the Whitewater Tannery. About 1826 Daniel P. Wigorins 
became Morrisson's partner, the style of the firm being Mor- 
risson & Wiggins. They continued business until 1845, when 
the Morrisson tannery was abandoned. Meantime the Smith 
tannery had been operated by various parties. About 1843 
D. P. Wiggins became a partner of Caleb R. Williams in the 
saddlery and harness-making business, of which he became 
sole proprietor in 1846. At the latter date, with his sons, Mr. 
Wiggins purchased the old Smith tannery, which was operated 
for several years in the firm name of D. P. Wiggins & Sons, 
who also continued the saddlery and harness business. Mr. 
Wiggins soon retired to his farm, south of the city. About 
1858 his sons became the owners of both the tannery and the 
harness shop, which they continued to manage jointly under 
the name of Wiggins & Co. until 1872. Stephen R. Wiggins 
& Son then took the tannery, and Charles O. Wiggins & 
Sons the harness department. 

The old Smith tannery was a small afiair, but its capacity 
was increased from time to time, and the establishment has 
greatly extended its facilities under the present owners. The 
works occupy about one acre of ground, and are supplied with 
all modern improvements. They have 108 vats, and have a 
capacity for tanning 200 hides per week. The annual prod- 
uct aggregates nearly $100,000. About twenty-five men 
are employed. < 

Zeller & Co.''s Cracker Factory. — This somewhat famous 
factory started in a small way about 1860. Mark Lewis and 
Stephen Wilson started the enterprise, which continued with 
various changes of owners until 1866, when it was purchased 
by J. S. & D. K. Zeller. They enlarged its capacity and 
removed from North Ninth street to 915, 917, 919 and 921 
Main street, where the brothers erected a building of which 
they took possession in August, 1869. At this place and time 



CITY OF RICHMOND. 91 

they had arranged for a capacity of fifteen barrels of flour 
per day. On Jan. 1, 1S72, they took in as partner Benj. F. 
Crawford, J. S. Zeller retiring from the firm, and changed 
the firm's name to Zeller & Co., J. G. Zeller, D. K. Zeller and 
B. F. Crawford constituting the firm. In 1874 they started 
a branch factory at Mansfield, Ohio. Seven years later they 
dissolved partnership, Mr. Crawford taking the Mansfield 
business except a portion sold to a Mr. Taylor, and the Messrs. 
Zeller concentrating their interest in Eichraond. This was 
in October, 1881. They built a fine brick addition, three stories 
high and 50 x52 feet in size, and enlarged their works to forty 
barrels per day, and then still further to seventy barrels of 
fl.our every twenty-four hours. This is now one of the largest 
factories of the kind in the State. A business of $130,000 
per annum has been built up from a very small beginning. 

Riohmond Rose Nursery. — This nursery is under the pro- 
prietorship and care of Hill & Co., who have erected for their 
business two glass-houses 18x100 feet, and four similar 
houses 10 X 100 feet in size. It is, as its name indi- 
cates, a rose nursery, there being nearly 300 varieties of this 
beautiful plant, and some of the finest of European roses 
among their number. It is in every respect a tribute to the 
taste, skill and culture of its proprietors. Perhaps the citizens 
of no city in the West have a more lovely or entertaining sight 
than those of Richmond, when this magnificent rose garden 
is in bloom and its fragrance fills the air. To this temple of 
floral beauty all visitors are taken, as being among the most 
beautiful sights which environs one of the handsomest cities 
in the West. 

BANKS. 

Richmond National Bank. — This is one of the oldest 
banking institutions in the State, being the outgrowth of 
the State Bank of Indiana, which was established m 1834 with 
Achilles Williams as President; Elijah Coffin, Cashier; and 
Charles F. Coffin, Teller. The bank was chartered for twenty- 
one years, and the cashier and teller held their respective of- 
fices during that time. The presidency was held from 1836 
until the expiration of the charter by Albert C. Blanchard. 



92 HISTORY OF WAYNE COUNTY. 

In 1855 the bank was reorganized as a branch bank of the 
State of Indiana, with A. C. Blanchard, President, and C. F. 
Coffin, Cashier. This bank continued business until 1865 and 
was then reorganized as the Richmond National Bank, with 
a capital stock of $230,000. At this time Charles F. Coffin 
was elected President, and has held the office ever since. Al- 
bert H. Blanchard was chosen Cashier. The first Directors 
were: C. F. Coffin, A. H. Blanchard, Stephen R. Wiggins, 
James L. Morrisson and James W. Smith. In 1873 Charles 
H. Coffin was elected Cashier, which position he still holds. 
He is also Vice-President. The present Directors are: C. F. 
Coffin, S. R. Wiggins, David J. Hoerner, Elwood Patterson 
and Chas. H. Coffin. The present capital is $250,000, with 
$35,000 surplus fund. The bank transacts a large business. 
It was among the last banks in the country to suspend specie 
payments and among the first to resume them. The bank 
has always taken great pride in assisting and fostering the 
manufacturing interests of the city. The building occupied 
by this bank is located at the northeast corner of Fifth and 
Main streets. It was erected in 1856, is of brick, with iron 
and stone front, three stories high, with a frontage of thirty- 
three feet, and is well adapted to the banking business. The 
office is spacious and well arranged. 

First National Bank. — The First National Bank of Rich- 
mond was organized and commenced business under the 
authority of the controller of the currency July 13, 1863. Its 
charter, which James E. and Mark E. Reeves were instru- 
mental in securing, extended nineteen years. The capital 
stock was $200,000. The first officers were James E. Reeves, 
President; Edward W. Yarrington, Cashier; Directors: James 
E. Reeves, Lewis Burk, Andrew F. Scott, John W. Grnbbs, 
John H. Moormann, Joshua Holland, Isaac P. Evans, James 
Van Uxem, Jr., and William S. Reid. This was the second 
national bank to commence business in the State and the 
seventeenth in the United States. From the first to the pres- 
ent time it has ranked among the leading financial institu- 
tions of Indiana. The present capital is $200,000, with a 
surplus fund of $100,000. Its average annual deposits exceed 
$500,000. In 1873 the present banking-house on the corner 



CITY OF RICHMOND. 93 

of Main and Seventh streets was erected. It is a spacious 
and well-arranged business building and is a credit to its 
originators. The building is of brick, three stories high, with 
a stone front and Mansard roof. The present officers of the 
bank are as follows: Jaraes E. Reeves, President; C. W. 
Ferguson, Vice-President; J. F. Peeves, Cashier; Directors: 
J. Van Uxera, D. B. Crawford, J. W. Grubbs, J. H. Moor- 
mann, C. W. Ferguson, A. M. Reeves, J. F. Reeves and J. 
E. Reeves. 

Second National Bank. — This institution was organized 
March 2, 1872, with a capital stock of $200,030. This 
amount was reduced Jan. 1, 1881, to $150,000, which is the 
present capital. The surplus fund is now $50,000. Andrew F. 
Scott was elected President, and John B. Dougan, Cashier; 
both still continue in office. The original Directors were : 
Jacob B. Julian, Oliver T. Jones, James Forkner, Jesse 
Cates, Andrew F. Scott, William G. Scott, John M. Gaar, 
Joseph Jackson and C. 0. Beeler. A number of changes 
have since taken place. The present Directors are: William 
G. Scott, Abram Gaar, A. F. Scott, John M. Gaar, Thomas 
W. Roberts, Ellis Thomas, Howell Graves, Robert Cox and 
J. B. Dougan. The Second National Bank building, north- 
west corner of Eighth and Main streets, was erected by A. F. 
Scott in 1862, and bought by the bank in 1872. Soon after 
the organization of the bank, Gaar, Scott & Co. bought out a 
number of the stockholders from the western part of the 
county, and have since held a controlling interest. The bank 
is one of the substantial institutions of the city, and has had 
a successful career from the beginning. 

The Farmers* Bank of Richmond, a private banking 
institution established by Stanley, Esteb & Co., began busi- 
ness in February, 1877, and continued until the fall of 1883, 
when it suspended with large losses to stockholders. 

The Provident Life Association of Richmond was organ- 
ized Dec. 31, 1879, and was the first life-insurance company 
ever formed in the citv. The incorporators were : Isaac P. 
Evans, D. W. Marmon, Wm. B. Hadley, Jesse W. Brooks, 
J. F. Reeves, James M. Starr, J. R. Preston, Eli Stubbs, Dr. 
J. R. Weist, and Samuel Bellis. On the 1st of November, 



94 



HISTORY OF WAYNE COUNTY. 



1883, the association became incorporated with the Provident 
Savings Life Assurance Society of New York City. 



BUSINESS STATISTICS. 



The following table, from Urquhart's Directory of 1881, is 
given, as no later statistics of the city are obtainable : 



Abstracts of titles 1 

Agricultural impl. dealers 5 

Agricultural impl. mnfrs 3 

Architects 1 

Artificial stone mnfrs 1 

Artists - 5 

Attorneys at law 45 

Auctioneers 4 

Awning makers 1 

Bakeries 8 

Baking powder mnfrs 1 

Banks 4 

Barber shops 15 

Beer bottlers 1 

Billiard rooms 2 

Bill posters. 2 

Blacksmith shops 12 

Blank book mnfr 1 

Boarding houses 32 

Boiler mnfrs 3 

Book binders 1 

Bone fetilizers 1 

Bonnet bleacheries 2 

Books, stationery, etc 3 

Boots and shoes 17 

" " " wholesale 1 

Breweries 2 

Brick manufacturers 4 

Broom manufacturers 1 

Business co'leges 1 

Butter and cheese manufacturers 1 

Butter and egg packers 3 

Candy manufacturers 1 

Candle manufacturers 1 

Carpenters and builders (firms) . . 14 

Carpet stores 3 

Carpet upholsterers 1 

Carpet weavers 4 

Carriage emporiums 5 

Carriage goods 1- 

Carriage manufacturers 4 

Chain manufacturers 1 

Chair manufacturers 5 

Chimney sweeps 1 

China, glass and queen's-ware. 4 
Church and school furniture 

manufacturers 2 

Cigar box mnfrs 1 

Cigars and tobacco (dealers) 8 

(mnfrs) 4 

Civil engineers , . 2 



Clothes wringer mnfrs 2 

Clothing dealers 8 

" renovators 4 

Coal and wood 8 

Coffee roasters - . 3 

Cofllin manufacturers 3 

Colleges 1 

Commission merchants 3 

Confectioners 7 

" (wholesale) 1 

Contractors (brick) 6 

(railroad) 3 

" (stone) 4 

Corn-planter manufacturers .... 3 

Cooper shops. 2 

Cotton and wool machinery 

(dealers) 1 

Cracker manufacturers 2 

Cranberry growers 1 

Dairies 4 

Detectives 3 

Dentists 7 

Directory publishers 1 

Dressmakers 27 

Druggists 7 

Dry-goods 6 

Dye houses 3 

Eave trough manufacturers 1 

" " hanger mnfrs. ... 1 

Engine builders 3 

Engravers (metal) 2 

Express companies 3 

Past freight lines (otfices) 3 

File works 2 

Florists 3 

Flour and feed stores 9 

Flour-mills 7 

Frame and moldings (mnfrs) . . 3 

Furniture dealers 6 

Furniture manufacturers 3 

Galvanized cornice works 8 

Gardeners 7 

Gas company 1 

Gents' furnishing goods 14 

Gold and silver mining co 1 

Grain drill manufacturers 3 

Grain and provision exchange. . 1 

Groceries (retail) 64 

Groceries (wholesale) 3 

Gunsmiths , 3 

Hairdressers 3 



CITY OF RICHMOND. 



95 



HamesmanufHclurers 2 

Hardware stores 6 

Hat makers 1 

Hats, caps, etc 8 

Hides, woo], etc 2 

Horse collar maaufactur- rs ... 2 

Horseshoers 5 

Hotels n 

Ice cream parlors 6 

Ice merchants 8 

Insurance agents 23 

Insurance companies 2 

Iron fence manufacturers 7 

Iron and steel dealers 1 

Jewelers 7 

Jewelers (wholesale) 1 

Justices of the Peace 3 

Laundries 2 

Lawn mower manufacturers. .. . 1 

Leather and findings 2 

Lime, plaster, cement, etc 4 

Linseed oil mills 3 

Lithographer . . 1 

Livery, feed and sale stables. . 8 

Loan agents 13 

Lumber dealers 7 

Machine shops 5 

Mantels and grates 2 

Marble works 2 

Map and chart cases 1 

Meat markets 11 

Merchant tailors 9 

Mill builders 1 

Millinery stores 9 

Mill machinery 1 

Mineral water manufacturer 1 

Model makers 2 

Musical instruments 3 

Musical institute 1 

Music teachers 19 

News agents 1 

Newspapers and periodicals 9 

Notaries Public 46 

Notions, fancy goods, etc. (retail) 9 
Notions, fancy goods, etc. 

(wholesale; 2 

Novelty stores 3 

Nurseries 2 

Oculist and aurist 1 

Painters l'^ 

Paints, oils, etc 7 

Paper box manufacturers 1 

Paperhangers (contractors) 4 

Paper-mills 1 

Pawnbrokers 3 

Photographers 5 

Physicians 36 

Piano manufacturers 1 

Planing-mills 3 

Plow manufacturers 3 



Plumbers, steam and gas fitters 4 

Pork-packers i 

Potteries , 2 

Printing offices 5 

Produce dealers 2 

Pump manufacturers 5 

Real estate agents 19 

Regalia manufacturers i 

Restaurants 7 

Roller skate manufacturers 1 

Roofers 1 

Rope manufacturers 1 

Saddlers' hardware. . . 2 

Saddlery, harness, etc 3 

Saloons 29 

Sash, doors and blinds 5 

Saw filers 3 

Saw-mills 1 

Second hand stores 4 

Seeds, etc 2 

Sewing machines 4 

Sheet music 2 

Shirt manufacturers 2 

Shoe blacking manufacturer. ... 1 

Soap manufacturers 3 

Solicitors of patents 2 

Spoke and fellow factory 1 

Spring bed bottoms 2 

Stamped goods 1 

Stair builders 1 

Steam governor manufacturers 1 

Steamship line agents 5 

Stencil cutter 1 

Stenographers 2 

Stoves, tinware, etc 11 

Street sprinklers 2 

Sugar-cured hams 3 

Tanneis 2 

Taxidermists 2 

Telegraph institutes 1 

Telegraph companies 1 

Threshing machine mnfrs 2 

Tile-mill manufacturer s 2 

Tinware manufacturers 2 

Toys, etc 1 

Umbrella manufacturers 1 

Undertakers 3 

Upholsterers 1 

U. S. Commissioners 2 

Veterinary surgeons 2 

Vault cleaners 2 

Wagon makers 5 

Wall paper, window shades 4 

Wind engine manufacturers 1 

Wines, liquors, etc 1 

Wire net work manufacturers. . . 1 

Wood carver 1 

Wood and willow ware 1 

Woolen-mills 2 



CHAPTER IV. 



PROMINENT INSTITUTIONS. 



Charitable, Educational and Benevolent "Works. — Wernus 
Orphans' Home. — Earlham Place Children's Home. — 
Home for Friendless Women. — Young Men's Christian 
Association.— Earlham College. — Secret Societies. — Ma- 
sons, Odd Fellows, Knights of Honor, Knights of Pyth- 
ias, Grand Army,. Red Men, etc. — Morrisson Library. — 
Mineral Cabinet. — New State Asylum for the Insane. 

wernle orphans' home. 

This beautiful retreat for those who have been left orphans 
and homeless is situated about two miles southeast of Rich- 
mond. The building itself was originally erected as an insti- 
tution of learning by the Friends' society, but was subse- 
quently disposed of, and for a short time used as a Health 
Reform School. Tliis not being a success, the buildings and 
grounds were neglected and the property involved by mort- 
gage. In 1877 the Joint Synod of Ohio elected a Board of 

Trustees, consisting of Revs. L. O. Loewenstein, .Trebel, H. 

Wickemeyer, E. Cronemet, F. H, Meiser, and Messrs. John 
Smith, of Hamilton, Ohio, Henry Cutter and John Spellman, 
to secure a location for an orphan home. This propertj^ at- 
tracted their attention, and it was purchased in 1879. The 
appointment of the Rev. Schuh, of Detroit, Mich., as solicit- 
ing agent in behalf of this great work of charity added 
materially to securing it by purchase. Among those who 
contributed to this worthy object was the Rev. Wernle, of 
Gallon, Ohio, in whose honor the institution was named, the 
reverend gentlemen contributing $500. This purchase was 
tor the building and ten acres of ground, but since then 
twenty acres more have been added, making thirty, and the 
building, originally 108x58 feet in size, has been added to by 



CITY OF EICHMOND. 97 

a wing of 25 x40 feet and two stories high, the same as the 
main building, with all the necessary out-buildings. The 
main building and wing are of brick, of pleasant outline and 
substantial work. 

The Home was placed under the charge of the Rev. John 
Dingelday Feb. 28, 1879, and he was duly installed March 
4, 1879. The Home was dedicated to its great work on the 
same day. 

.This institution is now (Jan. 1, 1881) the home of ninety- 
seven inmates, while at times over 100 have received its 
fostering care at a time. 

There is employed in the building one regular teacher, the 
housefather also assisting, who also holds religious service 
every Sabbath evening. The institution has prospered, and 
deserves the recognition of a charitable and Christian people. 

Space will not allow a full return of all the years, but 
enough is here given to show the scope of its duties and the 
great and good results of this important charitable institution. 
The report of the past year, 1883, is annexed: 

The number of inmates at the commencement of the year 
was: adults, fifteen; children, seven; admitted as members 
of the family, adults, thirty; children, sixteen; transient 
adults, ninety-six ; children, fifteen ; homes procured for 
adults, twenty-seven ; children, thirteen ; sent to friends, 
adults, twenty-six; children, eleven; sent to insane asylum, 
one; left without permission, three; died, one child; number 
of prisoners cared for fifty-three; number in the Home at 
present, adults, eight; children, six; prisoners, one; total 
cared for, 236. 

The Board of Managers for 1883 is as follows: Martha 
Yalentine, Agnes Gaar, Margaret Dennis, Mary F. Thomas, 
Libbie Candler, Sarah A. Ilifi" Davis, all of Richmond, Ind., 
and Abbie Dudley, Washington, D.C.; Anna Votaw, Chester; 
Lizzie Hill, Lavina Pierson, Rebecca Moorman, Princella 
Thomas, Fountain City; N'arcissa Cox, Elizabeth Commons, 
Cox's Mills; Abbie Hill, Anna N. Harn, Arba. 

The ofiicers of the Board are: President, Sarah A. Ilift 
Davis; Vice-Presidents, Anna Yotaw, Lizzie Hill, Narcissa 
Cox; Secretary, Margaret Dennis; Physician, Mary F. 
Thomas; Matron, Susan Hampton. 



98' HISTORY OF WAYNE COUNTY. 

The Corporate Committee: Mary Henley, Carthage; Pris-: 
cilia Parker, Walnut Ridge; Mary A. Gilbert, Louisville: E. 
Bogne, Fairmount, and Sarah Unthank, Ciiester. 

The Trustees are: William L. John, D. K. Zeller, Martha 
Valentine, Agnes Gaar and William Hill. 

orphans' home. 

The Orphans' Home, Earlham Place, was inaugurated from 
a fund of $10,000, known as the "Morrisson Eelief Fund." 
The work began in the year 1859, at 200 South Fifth street. 
The building used belonged to the city, and was given rent 
free as long as it was used, some twenty years. The interest 
of the money only was expended, that being the condition by 
which the fund was donated. 

An organization was formed under the above name when 
the fund could be utilized with the following officers, viz.: 
Mrs. Lydia C. Morrisson, President ; Mrs. Caroline M. 
Reeves, Yice-President; Mrs. Lizzie E. Barnes, Secretary, 
and Mrs. Sarah W. Webb, Treasurer. 

The Home was removed to Earlham Place in 1881, into a 
building purchased by the county commissioners at a cost of 
$6,000, for the special use of the Home, which they still oc- 
cupy free of charge. The county commissioners also, in ad- 
dition to the use of the propertj^, donate each year the sura 
of $800 toward defraying its expenses. This Home takes all 
the children from the county poor-house that are healthy and 
in such condition that will admit of educating and training 
for the active duties of life. The object of this institution is 
to educate, train and give a good home to children until a 
suitable one can be found for them, taking them at any age 
under fourteen years. 

There is employed in this Home a matron, an assistant 
matron and one kitchen girl, all the rest of the wort being 
done by ladies who are interested in caring for helpless chil- 
dren. Several ladies have for years been giving one day each 
week to the special care of those children, aiding in the work 
for the clothing and many other attentions necessary to their 
well being. This work began with but three or four children, 
but for several years it has had an average of eighteen, and 



CITY OF EICHMOND. 99 

at the present time has twenty-nine children as inmates of 
the Home. 

HOME FOR FRIENDLESS WOMEN. 

In the year 1868 a few Christian women, seeing the great 
necessity of some strong effort being made to protect and re- 
deem the homeless, friendless and fallen women of this city, 
met for the purpose of devising some means by which this 
great work could be accomplished. An organization was ef- 
fected and the following officers appointed: President, Mrs 
Rhoda Coffin ; Yice-President, Mrs. Iliff Davis ; Secretary, 
Mrs. Rachel Mendenhall, and Treasurer, Mrs. Mary Jackson. A 
membership fee was charged which realized $150 for the Home 
and the donations were enough to care and support a few of 
those that needed such care. At first the inmates were boarded, 
but this proving unsatisfactory a house was rented and fur- 
nished, the rent being paid by the city as its donation to th? 
Home. The work proving of inestimable value, Chas. T. 
Price urged the erection of a suitable building for the pur- 
pose and donated $500 and his services to superintending the 
erection, which was accepted, and a spacious Home was built 
at a cost of $9,000. In 1869 the Home was selected as a 
Woman's prison, and female prisoners were taken from the 
common jail and placed here. The past year, 1883, a prison 
building was added at a cost of $1,000, thus making a Reforma- 
tory Institute and Woman's Prison, the first of the kind in the 
State of Indiana, antedating the State institution some two 
years, and also being the first of the kind in the country. 

Mrs. Coffin remained President of the institution for three 
and a half years, when, her health failing, she was compelled 
to resign. Mrs. Iliff Davis was elected to the office, which 
she has most ably filled to the present time. The first nine 
years the Home took care of 757 adults and 296 children, and 
out of this number homes were provided for 243 adults and 
eighty-four children— a work of Christian charity that re- 
dounds not to the credit of the Home, but to the city of 
Richmond. 

Y. M. C. ASSOCIATION. 

This association came into existence April 23, 1867, and 
was conducted under a constitution and by-laws. Its first of- 



100 HISTORY OF WAYNE COUNTY. 

ficers were: President, Chas. F. Coffin ; Secretary, Almon 
Sampson. This continued until 1875, and much good resulted 
from its labors, but it was then allowed to droop and die. 
]^ov. 26, 1876, it was again resuscitated, with more flattering 
prospects, and Edward Bellis was chosen President; Clayton 
B. Hunt, Secretary and T. G. Thompson, Chairman of the 
Devotional Committee.. An office, under this management, 
was created called a General Secretary, who was the superin- 
tendent, in reality, of the association and gave his time to its 
progress. A. B. Charpie acted in this capacity for a year and 
then resigned the work to accept a ministerial call. Sept. 
26, 187^', H. B, Hudson was appointed General Secretary to 
succeed Mr. Charpie, but resigned his trust Nov. 17 following, 
and A. M. Dawson was asked to take the vacant place which he 
accepted, but only for a limited time, closing his labors as Sec- 
retary Feb. 1,1881. C. A. Boj'le received the appointment Feb. 
9, 1881, and resigned the following September, from which date, 
Sept. 26, 1881, until Sept. 8, 1882, the office of General Secre- 
tary was allowed to remain vacant. During this time T. G. 
Thompson superintended the work, and since Sept. 8, as above, 
has held the office of General Secretary, devoting his time 
to its duties. 

The good results which had followed from the reorganiza- 
tion of the association encouraged those engaged, and it was 
decided to form an incorporated association and provide a 
building fund for the erection of a suitable building to carry 
on their labor of love. The association was therefore duly 
incorporated under the laws of the State, and the following 
Trustees elected: D. K. Zeller, Timothy Nicholson, Abram 
Gaar, E. E. Beetle and H. H. Meerhoff. 

A building fund was started in May, and now has a nu- 
cleus of $276. 

The annual session was held Dec. 17, 1883, when the fol- 
lowing Board of Managers was chosen: Chas. A. Francisco, 
Geo. C. "Williams, one year; Edward Bellis, William J. 
Hiatt, two years; L. H. Bunyan, three years; T. G. Thomp- 
son, General Secretary; Mr. Ed. Bellis was chosen President; 
Geo. C. Williams, Yice-President; C. A. Francisco, Secretary 
and Treasurer. 



CITY OF RICHMOND. 101 

The Treasurer then made the following report: 

tkeasurer's report. 

Eeport of Treasurer of Y. M. C. A. for the rear endincr 
Dee. 17, 1883. " '^ 

Balance on hand per last report » -, r^n 

Received from subscriptions and annual membershins" ' fin? 14 

From rents T ."..'.'$ 46 25 

From special excursion to S. Home ....... . 54.75 

From reception and j ug breaking '....'.*.'.".'.*.". 53 70 

From Star course, 18b2-'3. 136 8'^ 

From Star course, 1883-'4 125 00 416 53 

Borrowed from Y. M. C. A. building fund 150M 

Total receipts ^ -^rj^ g,^ 

DISBURSEMENTS. 

For coal and stove repairs 35.65 

Printing 28.30 

Eleven months' rent to date, Dec. 1, 1888 220.00 

Expense of boys' reception 23.50 

Expense of delegates to State and International Conven- 
tions , 22.45 

Paid International Y. M. C. A. Committee 30.50 

Sundrv incidental expenses 43.76 

Paid General Secretary on account of salary 771.51 1,174.67 

The interest taken in the association by those whom it is 
designed to benefit is largely on the increase, and the associ- 
ation is encouraged to go forward in this work. 

EARLHAM COLLEGE. 

This institution is located about one mile west of the city 
of Richmond, and is owned and controlled by the society of 
Friends. Its origin and history are briefly as follows : In 
the year 1821 the various meetings of Friends in Indiana and 
Western Ohio, which. had hitherto been subordinate parts of 
Baltimore and Ohio Yearly Meetings, were organized into 
what was subsequently known as Indiana Yearly Meeting. In 
1830 a committee appointed by that body to consider the sub- 
ject of education, recommended to the subordinate meetings 
the establishment of schools to be under the care of commit- 
tees appointed by said meetings. These schools were to be 
taught by members of the church, and were to be distin- 
guished from the public schools chiefly by the care bestowed 
upon the moral and religious training of the pupils, which 
was, of course, to be in harmony with the doctrinal views 
entertained by the church. 



102 HISTOKi: OF WAYNE COUNTY. 

The advice of the committee resulted in a system of schools 
maintained and conducted by Friends, and reporting annu- 
ally through their supervisory committees to tlie Yearly 
Meeting. In 1834 seventy of these schools were reported; 
in 1838, 100; and in 1855 the maximum number, 129. 

As early, however, as 1832 the need of a higher school 
was urged in the Yearly Meeting, partly (perhaps chiefly) 
that the lower schools might be furnished with properly 
qualified teachers. A committee was appointed to receive 
subscriptions for the new enterprise. At that time there 
were few Friends in the West who possessed any considerable 
means. Yoluiitary contributions came in very slowly, and 
it was not until five years had passed that a committee was 
authorized to proceed with the work of erecting buildings. 
Various causes, among which was the financial crisis of 1837, 
still conspired to disappoint the friends of the movement; 
and nearly ten years more had elapsed before the school was 
opened under Cornelius Douglass, its firdt Superintendent, 
and Lewis A. Estes and Huldah C. Hoag, its first teachers. 
The institution was known as Friends Boarding School. 

The report to the Yearly Meeting in 1850 contains the fol- 
lowing paragraph : 

"The examination of the scholars shows that their instruc- 
tion has been thorough; and from the course of instruction 
now, we are gratified in believing that the necessity is taken 
away for our young people to resort to institutions out of the 
pale of our society for a more thorough or extended education." 

The studies which, according to the same report, had been 
actually pursued during the year embraced about two-thirds 
of all now included in the preparatory course, and one-fourth 
of all in the collegiate course. Tliere had been an average 
of " fifty-three pupils, male and female." The school year 
consisted of two sessions of twenty-three weeks each. The 
charge for board and tuition per session was from $30 to $35. 

The infiuence of the school soon began to be felt in all the 
neighborhoods of Friends in the West. The thirst for higher 
knowledge became more general; and a still more extended 
and systematic course of study was adopted. In 1859 the 
institution was empowered to confer degrees upon its gradu- 
ates, and its name was changed to Earlham College. 



CITY OF KICHMOND. 103 

in 1867 " the duties devolving upon the superintendent" 
were "divided into those of president and treasurer." Since 
that time there has been, until recently, no essential change 
in the organization of the institution, though numerous im- 
provements have taken place in the courses of study, the ap- 
pliances for instruction, and the provisions for the comfort 
and convenience of the students. 

In the general control and management of the institution, 
however, a very important change has taken place. The 
Yearly Meeting which originated the work has become two 
large bodies, one still known as Indiana Yearly Meeting, 
and held at Richmond; the other. Western Yearly Meeting, 
held at Plainlield, Ind, The college property is now held 
and its affairs controlled by a Board of Trustees appointed by 
the two bodies, each body electing twelve. The president of 
the faculty is an ex-officio member. This change was effected 
in 1881. The wisdom of placing ' the entire control in the 
hands of a small number of carefully selected men and 
women has been clearly demonstrated by the rapidity and 
the intelligence with which various improvements have been 
planned and executed since the new board entered upon the 
discharge of its duties. 

The college buildings at present will comfortably accom- 
modate 140 students as boarders, besides a considerable num- 
ber of day students. Ample provision is made for heat and 
light, for the cleanliness of the apartments, and for the care 
of the sick. 

The grounds are ample, embracing extensive play-grounds, 
a beautiful lawn, groves, and long walks shaded with various 
kinds of trees. The entire enclosure known as the " college 
grounds " contains 120 acres. 

The appliances for instruction are, in some departments, 
quite superior. The cabinet contains many thousand excel- 
lent specimens, illustrating the various natural sciences, and 
is regarded as one of the finest collections in the Mississippi 
Yalley. The observatory, situated near the main building, 
contains an equatorial telescope with an object glass of six 
and one-fourth inches aperture, and a focal length of eight 
feet; a transit instrument of five feet focus, and an asti-onom- 
ical clock. 



104 HISTORY OF WAYNE COUNTY. 

The college is also in possession of excellent surveying 
instruments, a good assortment of philosophical apparatus, 
and a convenient chemical laboratory with the necessary ap- 
pliances for qualitative analysis. 

The libraries contain upward of 5,000 volumes, among 
which are many valuable reference books. The reading-room 
is furnished with the best of magazines, reviews, religious 
periodicals and newspapers. To these and to the reference 
libraries students have daily access. 

The courses of study, both scientific and classical, are 
quite comprehensive, and will compare very favorably with 
those of any other college in the State; and the instruction 
has usually been in the hands of professors and teachers well 
qualified for their positions. 

The supervision of the work has devolved upon men of ex- 
cellent ability. Barnabas C. Hobbs, LL.D. having been its 
first President. For about fifteen years the duties of that 
position have devolved upon Joseph Moore, LL.D., who has, 
by his extensive attainments in science, his unusual ability 
in imparting knowledge, and the pure and inspiring influence 
of his character and teachings, made himself honored and 
beloved by all who know him. The cabinet is chiefly the re- 
sult of his untiring labors, its corals — said ' to surpass in 
variety and beauty any other collection in the "West — having 
been nearly all obtained by him on the Sandwich Islands. 
President Moore, in the summer of 1883, resigned on ac- 
count of ill health, but was at once elected Professor of 
Natural Science. 

Of the character of the work at Earlham there could be no 
better proof than the reputation which its older graduates 
enjoy as intelligent, capable, Christian citizens. Many of 
them hold positions of honor. 

The present condition of the college is highly satisfactory, 
and the prospect for the future is very encouraging. At a 
recent meeting of the Board of Trustees, Prof. J. J. 
Mills was chosen President of the college. He will enter 
upon his duties at the beginning of the next college year 
(September, 1884). 

Allen Jay is the efficient Treasurer and Business Manager. 







Y2^ /iyicu-^^^t^J^/.*-^-€K^^^ t^^ c?4~y 




Mt 






Cfff-Ttu/-/^ jS. £iy,tA^aA-<^ 



CITY OF RICHMOND. 105 

Flans are on loot for the erection of a new college buildino-. 
A plan is also well nigh completed for the union of the 
Friends' academies and the college in an efficient educational 
system. 

A COMMERCIAL COLLEGE 

was first established in E-ichmond in 1860 by Wm. Purdy, 
who, after two years of labor,disposed of his work to Messrs. 
Hollingsworth & Gentry. In 1866 Mr.. HoUingsworth be- 
came sole proprietor. He carried on the business successfully 
and the college became, under his thorough management, a 
well-known institution for receiving a practical education. 
At the death of Mr. Hollingsworth, B. W. Barrows succeeded 
to the business, and in 1876 the latter disposed of it to Jno. 
K. Beck. The latter gentleman was eminently successful 
as a business educator, and the attendance increased until 
1882 when it became necessary to secure more permanent 
help and he associated with him Mr. F. C. Fulgham. Be- 
sides a full commercial education, a department of" telegraphic 
instructions was added in 1881 with lines, batteries and all the 
practical details of the business. The college is now in a 
prosperous condition, and in appliances and thorough course 
of studies ranks among the best institutions of the kind in 
the West, and stands noted among the business and progres- 
sive interests of the city. 

ODD FELLOWS. 

In the city of Richmond there are four lodges of the In- 
dependent Order of Odd Fellows, numbered respectively 41, 
199, 212 and 254. 

Whitewater Lodge, No. 41, 1. 0. 0. F., of Eichmond 
was instituted May 21, 1847, by Special Deputy George 
Page Chapman, of Indianapolis. 

The names of the charter members were: Edwin Irwin, 
W. L. Farquhar, William P. Wilson, Sedate Bickmore and 
Thomas Vickers — five in all. 

Officers: W. P. Wilson, N. G.; Sedate Bickmore, Y. G.; 
Edwin Irwin, K S.; Thomas Yickers, Treasurer. 

In 1858 No. 41 instructed her Board of Trustees to pur- 



106 HISTORY OF WAYNE COUNTY. 

chase a corner lot, then a little too far east to be of value for 
business, but now in the very heart of the city. This lot was 
held by JNo. 41, until December, 1867, when it was sold to 
the Board of Trustees of the Odd Fellows' Hall Building 
Association for 400 shares of capital stock of said asso- 
ciation; value of each share, $25. Under the management of 
this Board of Trustees, with a capital stock of |32,000, a 
good substantial three-story building was erected. In the 
third story of this building the lodge hall, Encampment 
liall, and suitable ante-rooms are located, giving to the order 
in this city pleasant rouras that are commodious enough for 
their present and future use. The lodge hall and ante-rooms 
were fitted up in good taste and comfort by the four lodges 
jointly, under the supervision and management of a union 
Board of Trustees. The Encampment hall was furnished 
and thoroughly fitted up by the Oriental Encampment, No. 
28, under the direction of a special committee appointed for 
that purpose, who discharged their duty so well that entire 
satisfaction was the pleasant result of their labor. This 
lodge has sixty-four Past Grands and 195 contributing mem- 
bers, and its resources amount to $25,947.90. 

Woodward Lodge^ No. 212, /. O. 0. i^.,at Richmond, was in- 
stituted Aug. 30, 1859, by D. D. G. M.E. A. Jones. The char- 
ter members were: A. J. Shinn, A. W. Mendenhall, O. H. P. 
Little, R. Doble, O. H. Shearon, S. Sinex, D. P. Grave, W. 
P. Wilcoxon, E. 0. Pyle, John Harrington, T. J. Kewby, H. 
P. Leeds, W. W. Foulke, W. W. Hewitt and Geo. Hoover. 
First officers: E. C. Pyle, N. G. ; Wm. W. Foulke, Y. G.; 
A. W. Mendenhall, P. S. ; O. H. P. Little, Treas. ; O. H. 
Shearon, Per. Sec. Original number of members, 43. All 
the charter members of Richmond Lodge, No. 254, were 
from Woodward. There were twenty-two of them in all; a 
part of the members of Stidham Lodge, No. 261, were from 
"Woodward, as also all the charter members of Rinehart 
Lodge, and nearly all of Webster Lodge. 

There are but few, if any, lodges in the jurisdiction of 
Indiana that have been drawn on so heavily, and yet but few 
can make a better showing at present. The year ending 
December, 1874, this lodge numbered 161 contributing mem- 
bers, with $7,258.27 as resources of the lodge. 



CITY OF RICHMOND. 1Q7 

Woodward was the iirst lodsje in the State that expelled a 
member for selling intoxicating liquors to be used as a bever- 
age. This lodge has Past Grands, 44; contributing members, 
151 ; resources $6,800. The present officers are: °George w! 
Keynolds, N. G. ; John F. Rowlett, Y. G.; James A. Reed', 
Sec; E. E. Beetle, Treas. ; Trustees, Arthur A. Currae, John 
T. Davenport and Oliver Yates. 

Herman Lodge, No. 199, /. O. O. I., was granted a dispensa- 
tion by Grand Master P. A. Hackleman, on the 8th of April* 
1858, and D. D. G. M. Albertson was appointed to institute 
the same. It was instituted May 14, 1858. The applicants 
for the charter were: John H. Popp, Anton Agle, Joseph 
Schulser, John M. Hannmann, Chas. Holscher, Jacob Goeh- 
ner, John Schoumann, Egbert Wiesner, Lewis Runge and 
Henry Kubble. First officers: John H. Popp, N. G. ; Henry 
Kubble, Y. G.; Jos. Schulser, R. S. ; Jacob Goehner, Treas- 
urer, with an original membership of 11. Jno. H. Popp was 
the first representative to the Grand Lodge, in May, 1859. 
The report for the year 1874 shows that chis lodge had a list 
of twenty-three Past Grands, and 137 contributing members 
with resources to the amount of $4,502.03. The report of the 
year 1883 gives this lodge a membership ot 125, Past Grands 
thirty-seven, and its resources at $6,762.21. 

Richmond Lodge, JVo. 254, 7. 0. O. ^'., was organized 
March 12, 1866. Charter members: Peter Johnson, W. W. 
Dudley, Oran Perry, J. R. Woods, J. R. Weist, E. H. 
Strattan, J. H. Mclntyre, M. M. Lacy, M. E. McMeans, A. 
S. Johnson, G. W. Benton, J. J. Russell, B. J. Miller, James 
Skinner, Joshua Hunt, Philemon Dickinson, J. E. Rogerson, 
J. P. Iliff. First officers: J. R. Woods, N. G. ; M. M. Lacy, 
Y. G.; M. E. McMeans, R. S.; J. R. Weist, Treas.; J. J. 
Russell, Per. Sec. Past Grands, thirty-two; contributing 
members at this date, 109; resources, $4,300. 

Oriental Encampment, JS'o. 28, I. O. O. F., was chartered 
July 17, 1851. The charter members were: A. F. Scott, W. 
L. Farquhar, R. A. Paige, Enos Thomas, J. K. Boswell, Wm. 
Wiggins and J. D. Halleck. The officers for 1851 were: A. 
F. Scott, C. P.; R. A. Paige, H. P.; Wm. Wiggins, S. W.; 
J. K. Boswell, J. W. ; W. L. Farquhar, Scribe; Enos Thomas, 



108 HISTORY OF WAYNE COUNTY. 

Treas. The present membership is 133. Oifficers for 
1884: Chas. C. Binkley, C. P.; Elijah Lawton, H. P.;.Chas. 
G. Swain, S. W.; Frank T. Rawn, J. W. ; John McMinu, 
Scribe; Henry R. Downing, Treas.; Trustees, Geo. Bishop, 
John F. Davenport, E. J. Salter. 

Harmonia Encampment^ No. 75, /. O. 0. ^., was organ- 
ized Feb. 8, 1866. Charter members: Charles Leive, Jacob 
Goehner, Christian Shulz, Gottleib Lichtenfels, Henry Kru- 
vel, Louis Meyer, J. H. Scheppmann, Anton Bescher, Gott- 
leib Weidner, Baltasar Bescher, P. S. Hoffmann, Louis I^^nopf, 
Louis Runge, Anton Egli, Sales Minner, Isaac Shire. First 
officers: P. S. Hoffmann, C. P.; Charles Leive, H. P.; Louis 
Knopf, S. W.; Louis Runge, J. W. ; Louis Meyer, Scribe; 
Anton Bescher, Treas. Present officers: Wm. Schultz, C. P.; 
Peter Kuhlman, S. W. ; August May, J. W.; Fred Janke, H. 
P.; Wm. Yietze, Scribe; C. A. Bartel, Treas. It meets the 
first and third Tuesdays of every month. 

Hermenia Lodge, No. 25, Daughters of Rebekah, was in- 
stituted July 23, 1869, with charter members as follows : H. 
Driftmeyer, G. Kramer, H. Meerhoof, H. Kehlenbrink, S. 
Sperling, D. Kehlenbrink, H. Greivey, D. Theurer", H. 
Hanseman, M. Greivey, M. Theurer, S.Hanseman, G. Meyer, 
C. Schumann. This lodge meets the first Saturday of each 
month. Present officers: Ellen Greivey, N. G. ; Wilhelmina 
Knopf, Y. G. ; Henry Greivey, Sec; Sophia Bartel, Treas. 

Eden Lodge., No. 30, Daughters of Rebekah, was instituted 
Sept. 8, 1869, with the following charter members: E. J, 
Salter, William P. Wilson, D. Lesh, J. F. Davenport, 
S. S. Gause, John McMinn, P. S. Hoffman, J. J. Stoker, 
M, F. Gardner, J. J. Finney, Angeline Shearon, Jane W. 
Hoffman, Mary A. Stoker, Mary Gardner, S. A. Finney and 
Eliza McClelland. This lodge meets the second and fourth 
Saturdays of each month. Present officers: J. W. Haller, N. 
G. ; Mrs. Wm. Alexander, Y. G.; Mrs. Kate E. Keyt, Rec. 
Sec; Mrs, Maggie Spekenhier, Treas. ; Mrs. Sadie Stratton, 
Per. Sec. 

The Odd Fellows' Provident Association., of Wayne County 
was organized Jan. 1, 1869, for the purpose of creating and 
perpetuating a fund for the relief of widows, orphans, and 



CITY OF RICHMOND. 109 

the survivors of its members. Its membership is confined to 
the families of Odd Fellows in Wayne, Henry, Eaiidolph and 
Union counties. Its membership now numbers 550. To the 
present date (March, 1884), $50,000 have been paid out in 
benefits. The present officers are John Yaryan, President; 
L. C. Hufi; Vice-President; Edward Bellis, Secretary; and J. 
J. Finney, Treasurer. 

The Odd Fellows Hall Building AssoGiation was organ- 
ized several years ago as a joint stock company, and now has 
a capital stock of $40,000, all paid in. The Odd Fellows' 
Hall building, erected in 1868 and 1869, with an addition, 
erected in 1883, is one of the finest buildings in the city. It 
is three stories high, fronting eighty-eight feet on Main street, 
and is 100 feet deep. The lower part of the building is oc- 
cupied by stores; the second floor is used for business offices, 
and the third story contains the lodge-rooms. The building 
is well finished throughout, and is beautifully and tastefully 
constructed. The officers of the Building Association are: H. 
R. Downing, President; Edward Bellis, Secretary, and J. F. 
Davenport, Treasurer. The management is vested in a Board 
of Trustees, consisting of nine members, who are elected an- 
nually, two from each of the four lodges of the city, and one 
from the Encampment. 

Patriarchal Circle.- — Richmond Temple, No. 4, P. C, was 
instituted May 9, 1882, by Supreme Yice Oracle L. P. Vorde- 
mark, and Deputy Supreme Oracle Robert Stratton, both of 
Fort Wayne. The following were the charter members: J. 
F. Davenport, Gehring Stace, H- R- Downing, L. C. Hufi", 
George Bishop, C. E. Newman, John Nolte, E. J. Salter, 
Mark Mitchell, Jacob Koss, W. M. Mitchell, W. Kitson, E. 
Lawton, W. H. Talhelm, S. B. Williamson, 0. Personett, F. 
W. Robinson, Jr., Frank Kitson, Ed. Kitson, Joseph Brush, 
M. L. Stratton, J. A. Reed. The first oflScers were: H. R. 
Downing, Oracle; L. C. Huff, Vice-Oracle; Geo. Bishop, 
Marshal; Gehring Stace, Commander; C. E. Newman, Secre- 
tary; J. Nolte, Finance Secretary; E. J. Salter, Treasurer; 
M. Mitchell, Venerable Oracle; J. F. Davenport, Counsel; 
Trustees, Gehring Stace, H. W. Talhelm, F. W. Robinson, 
Jr. The present officers are: Geo. Bishop, O.; Gehring 



110 HISTORY OF WAYNE COUNTY. 

Stace, V. O.; E. Lawton, M.; T. L. Pierce, C; F. T. Rawn, 
Sec; M. L. Stratton, F. S. ; E. J. Salter, Treas.; Trustees, 
H. W. Talhelm, John Nolte, H. R. Downing. The member- 
ship is fifty-five. Meetings are held on the second and fourth 
Tuesdays of each month. 

RED MEN, OSCEOLA LODGE. 

This lodge was instituted Nov. 18, 1868, with ten charter 
members, viz.: Charles Sinex, Charles Hepp, M. T. Gardner, 
Allen W. Grave, Ed. H. Conkle, Harry C. Jones, George 
Williams, H. B. Atwood, Ed. J. Salter, P. S. Hoffman; 
First Red Men, Charles Sinex, Charles Hepp; First Pale-faces, 
M. T. Gardner, Allen W. Grave, Ed. H. Conkle, Harry C. 
Jones, George Williams, H. B. Atwood, Ed. J. Salter, and 
P. S. Hoffman. 

Since the organization over 200 pale-faces have been 
adopted, some of whom have moved away and some have 
gone over to the Great Spirit, leaving at present ninety-five 
members. 

P. S. Hoffman was elected the first representative to the 
great council of the State, which met at Lafayette, at which 
time he was elected to the second office of the State. 

The order has flourished since its organization, and is strong 
in the affection of its members. But four of the charter 
members now reside in Richmond, viz.: P. S. Hoffman, M. 
T. Gardner, Chas. Hepp and T. J. Salter. 

MASONIC. 

Webb Lodge, No. 24, I. (& A. M. — From the oldest record 
in possession of this lodge it is gathered that on the 7th ot 
October, 1823, the Grand Lodge of Indiana granted a charter 
to its "trusty and beloved brethren," William Pugh, W. M. ; 
James R. Mendenhall, S. W., and William Yaughan, J. W., 
who, with other brethren, were authorized to " liold a just 
and true lodge of F. & A. M. in the town of Centre ville, 
Ind." Such was the beginning of Masonry in Wayne County. 
The charter, dated at Madison, was signed by John Sheets, 
G. M. ; Jonathan Jennings, G. S. W.; Thomas Posey, G. J. 
W.; and Walter C. Keen, G. Sec. The " regular communica- 



CITY OF RICHMOND. Hi 

tions " and " called meetings " were held at Centreville, be- 
ginninor on Nov. 7, 1823. " Young's History " mentions the 
names of other first officers, as follows: John Suffrins, Treas.; 
John C. Kibbej, Sec; Samuel Es^ans, S. D. ; and William 
M. Doughty, J. D.; and further states that "the lodge met 
alternately at Centreville and Richmond until 1833, when a 
charter was granted to Samuel Fleming, John Finley and 
William S. Addleman, to be held at Richmond." The old 
record shows that meetings were held at Centreville until 
1825, and on the 31st of December of that year the first 
meeting was held in "Richmond, in a room rented for six 
months of John C. Kibbey. At that time it was vote'J that 
"all members living west of the old boundary line be exempt 
from the payment of dues for six months." The dnes re- 
quired by the lodge were " 25 cents per month, and 25 cents 
for each festival." The records show that every meeting 
was opened on the E. A. degree, and that all business relating 
to the good of the order was done in that degree, save ballot- 
ing for second and third degrees. The applicants were 
"elected, admitted within the lodge, and initiated in ancient 
form," The minutes invariably show that the lodge was 
"closed in peace and harmony, and adjourned to the next 
regular communication." 

July 22, 1826, the lodge adjourned to Centreville for the 
ensuing six months. The records show that this system of 
alternately meeting six months in each of the two towns was 
kept up until January, 1828, when the lodge adjourned to 
Richmond, where it continued to hold regular meetings until 
July 23, 1831, and here the record abruptly ends. 

The organizing members of WebbLodge were: Bartholomew 
McCleary, John Suffrins, Philip Mason, John C. Kibbey, 
Jacob Yandergriff, Loring A. Waldo, William D »ughty, J. 
W. Kemble, Lot Bloomfield, John M. Gay, William Petty, 
Lewis Burk, William Pugh and William H. Vaughan. The 
succession of Worshipful Masters has been as follows: Will- 
iam Pugh, 1823 ; J. R. Mendenhall, 1821 ; William Pugh, 
1821-'26; J. R. Mendenhall, 1826; William Pugh, 1827; J. 
C. Kibbey, 1827 ; John Finley, 1828 ; J. C Kibbey, 1828; 
Samuel Fleming, 1829; J. C. Kibbey, 1829 ; Samuel Han- 



112 HISTOKY OF WAYNE COUNTY. 

nah, 1S30; Samuel Fleming, 1831; J. C. Kibbej, 1831; Sam- 
uel Fleming, 1830-'4 : John Finley, 1834 ; Samuel Fleming, 
1835; J. C. Kibbey, 1836; W. B. Smith, 1837; Samuel Flem 
ing, 1838; Lewis Biirk, 1839; W. B. Smith, 1839; S. B. Stan- 
ton, 1840 ; W. B. Smith, 1844; William W. Lynde, 1847; 
Samuel M. Poe, 1847; W. B. Smith, 1848; William W. Lynde, 
1849; W. B. Smith, 1852; S. H. Perrington, 1855; W. W. 
Lynde, 1859; James M. Smith, 1861; Christian Fetta, 1863; 
Samuel Conklin, 1867; Samuel Marlatt, 1868; Christian Fetta, 
1869; Samuel Marlatt, 1870 ; D. W. Johnson, 1871 ; Charles 
E. Marlatt, 1871-'2; Christian Fetta, 1873-'4; S. Marlatt, 
1875 ; C. Fetta, 1876 ; R. R. Morris, 1877-'8 ; C. E. Marlatt, 
1879; C. Fetta, 1880-'l ; A. W. Hempleman, 1882-3. R. F. 
Davis is the present S. W., and IS", P. Wood, J. W. The 
lodge has a strong membership and is prosperous. Webb 
Lodg'e has the honor of having had grand officers of the 
Grand Masonic bodies of Indiana filled from her ranks as 
follows: William B. Smith, First Grand High Priest of the 
Grand Chapter, one year ; Christian Fetta, Grand Master of 
the Grand Lodge for two years ; E. D. Palmer, Grand Com- 
mander of the Grand Commandery, one year; and W. W. 
Austin, Grand Thrice Illustrious Master of the Grand Coun- 
cil for two years. 

Richmond Lodge^ No. 196, F. <& A. J/., was granted a 
dispensation Aug. 8, 1855, and organized with first officers as 
follows : Lewis Bnrk, W. M.; W. L. Farquhar, S. W.; and 
William F. Spinning, J. W. The lodge was chartered May 
28, 1856. The following were the officers and charter mem- 
bers: William B. Smith, W. M.; William Sinex, S. W.; 
William F. Spinning, J. W.; Lewis Burk, Treas. ; John W. 
Griffin, Sec; Charles Fisk,'S. D.; Henry Staley, J. D. ; T. 
J. Fergnson, William L. Farquliar, Joseph Thatcher, John 
Elderkin, John Finley and John Sufi^rins. The following 
have served as Worshipful Masters : Lewis Burk, W. B. 
Smith, O. J. Hyde, Stephen Babcock, J. A. Unthank (two 
terms), F. N. Rosen reel, J. A. Unthank, A. Samson (four 
terms), W. P. Ratliff'(two terms), R. W. Deeley (two terms) 
Calvin B.Walker, A. Samson (three terms), Elihu M. Parker, 
R. W. Deeley (two terms), and Martin Cnllaton since !1879. 



CITY OF RICHMOND. 113 

Present officers: A. E. Chase, S. W.; L. Fisher, J. W.; Simon 
Fox, Treas.; J. De Witt, Sec; B. Ballard, R. W. Deeley, 
and F. M. Wheelan, Trustees. The lodge has seventy-seven 
members, and is in a prosperous condition. 

King Bolomon Chapter^ No. 4, was organized Jan. 1, 
1838, under a dispensation from the General Grand Chapter 
of the United States. It was one of the four chapters that 
organized the Grand Chapter of the State of Indiana on the 
25th of December, 1845. The chapters referred to were King 
Solomon, Madison, Logan and Lafayette. 

The first officers of King Solomon Chapter were J. K. 
Mendenhall, H. P. ; Francis King, K.; Benjamin Sayre, S. 
The present officers are: Christian Fetta, H. P. ; W. J. Robie, 
K.; and L. J. Kinsey, S. Present membership, 115. 

Wayne Council., No. 10, Royal and Select Masons, wsi& 
granted a dispensation April 1, 1857. The officers were as 
follows: William W. Lynde, T. I. M.; S. H.Harrington, 
Deputy T. I. M.; James P. Mendenhall, P. C. W.; Stephen 
Babcock, C. G.; James M. Poe, Recorder: Lewis Burk, 
Treasurer; Charles O'Hara, Tiler. Among the early members 
were W. W. Austin, J. M. Smith, Henry Bitsel, E. M. Cook 
and Jehial Hampton. The following is a list of Thrice Illustri- 
ous Masters of this council : 1857-9, William W. Lynde ; 1860, 
.F. A. Hardin; 1861, J. Sufi'rins; 1862-'5, W. W. Austin; 
1866-'7, Samuel Marlatt; 1868, Christian Fetta; 1869-'70, 
Samuel Conklin; 1871-'2, Leroy Land; 1873-'5, Samuel 
Conklin; 1876, Samuel Marlatt; 1877-'82, W. W. Austin; 
1883, Christian Fetta; J. L. Smith, Deputy. Membership of 
the council in March, 1884, thirty-seven. 

Richmond Commandery, No. 8, was organized March 20, 
1865, with the following officers andciiarter members: Lewis 
Burk, E. C; E. D. Palmer, G.; J. B. O'Hara, C. G.; 
Stephen Babcock, T. W. O. Braff'ett, B. L. Martin, A. S. 
Wiggins, F. A. Hardin, H. Beitzell, John Webbert, and 
John F. Beard. The following have held the office of Emi- 
nent Commander: E. D. Palmer, 1865-'68; Samuel Conklin, 
1869; Christian Fetta, 1870; R. W. Deeley, 1871; E. D. 
Palmer, 1872; T. W. O. Braffett, 1873; J. E. Taylor, 1874; 
C. E. Marlatt, 1875; E. D. Palmer, 1876; Leroy Land, 



114 HISTORY OF WAYNE COUNTY. 

1877-9; Samuel Marlatt, 1880; W. J. Eobie, 1881-'2; Jos. 
L. Smith, 1883. The present officers are: W. T. Noble, 
G.; and John H. Nicholson, C. G. The membership is 103; 
The regular meetings are held on the evening of the first 
Monday of each month. 

Masonic Building Association was organized Dec. 14, 
1868, the object of the organization being to provide a 
home for the various Masonic bodies of this city. 

On the first day of Januarj', 1879, arrangements were en- 
tered into with Mr. Hittle, and a ten-year lease was secured 
on the third story of the Hittle Block, corner of Main and 
Ninth streets, for the nse of the association. The present 
officers of the association are: H. N. Land, Pres. ; E. D. 
Palmer, Sec. Tlie capital stock is $5,000, and the associ- 
ation is progressing. 

The Masonic Library Association was organized April 6, 
1874. The first officers chosen were: Christian Fetta, Presi- 
dent; A. Samson, Secretary, and A. G. Ogborn, Librarian. 
The object of the association is to procure Masonic, moral and 
scientific literature for the use of Masons and their families. 
The library-room is in Masonic Hall and contains about 1,000 
volumes. 

Orderofthe Etstern Star. — Loyal Chapter, of the Order of 
the Eastern Star, No. 49, was chartered April 14, 1881, with 
charter members as follows: Misses Anna M. Morris, Carrie 
E. Kibbey, Ellen J. Palmer, Clara B. Kendall, Anna B. 
Cullaton, Louisa Samson, Mary Yan Frank, Addle De Witt, 
Katie B. Hlggins, Helen L. Dougan, Ellen J. Marlatt, Jo- 
sephine Chatfield, Alma H. Holton, Martha Dennis, Helen 
Deeley, Louisa Fetta; Mrs. Alice N. Robie, Emma A. Ben- 
jamin, Alice G. Land, Jennie Johnston, Delia Hayes, Etne- 
line Land; Messrs. Almon Samson, llobt. R. Morris, John 
J. Higglns, Martin Cullaton, H. M. Yan Frank, H. N. Land, 
D. W. Johnson, Wm. L. Chatfield, Frank Dennis, Wm. J. 
Robie, Chas. E. Marlatt, John De Witt, Edwin D. Palmer, 
John F. Kibbey, W. N. Kendall, R. W. Deeley, J. U. Hayes, 
John B. Dougan, H. N. Benjamin, Christian Fetta, W. M. 
Thompson. The first officers were: Worthy Matron, 
Addle M. De Witt; Worthy Patron, Almon Samson; Associ- 



CITY OF KICHMOND. 115 

ate Matron, Carrie E. Kibbey; Treasurer, Helen M. Dongan; 
Secretary, Clara B. Kendall; Conductress, Ellen J. Marlatt; 
Associate Conductress, Katie B. Higjrlns; Ada, Ellen J. 
Palmer; Ruth, Helen Deeley; Esther, Alma H. Holton; Mar- 
tha, Anna B. Cullaton; Electa, Alice Chatfield; Warder, Delia 
Hayes. The present membership is 96. Present officers: 
Mrs. C. B. Kendall, W. M.; Wm. J. Robie, W. P.; Addie 
De Witt, A. M.; Fannie B. Hunt, Treas.; E. J. Johnson, Sec. 
The lodge meets once m each month. 

KNI&HTS OF PYTHIAS. 

Cceur de Leon Lodge^ No. 8, K. of P., was instituted 
under the Gi-rand Lodge of the State, July 12, 1870, with the 
following charter members: Harry C. Jones, Simon Bach- 
man, M. E. Hillis, J. P. Iliff, Lewis K. Harris, John Messick, 
I. H. Pdxson, William A. McAdams, Jacob Theis, John 
Reichert, Y. L. Baylies, O. B. Piraphrey, F. W. Hoffman, 
J. B. Smith, Albert Simons, W. Zimmerman, Fred Knollen- 
berg. The following officers were elected: Wm. Surrendorf, 
P. C. ; Lewis Uhte, C. C; Fred Steine, Y. C; Frank Bescher, 
M. A.; Fred Besselman, M. F.; Herman Bath, K. of R. & 
S.; Henry Seefloth, L G.; Henry Klopp, O. G.; Wm.Klopp, 
P. This lodge has a good membership and is prosperous. 

lola Lodge, No. 53, K of P., was chartered May 23, 1879, 
by Arthur A. Curme, Grand Chancellor of the jurisdiction of 
Indiana. The charter members were: Jacob Theis, J. J. 
Chase, G. W. Phillips, J. B. Hill, A. H. Morehead, T. A. 
Workman, Isaac Kline, W. H. Stanley, ^A. Inglish, H. W. 
Wilke, A. E. Crocker, J. L. Stongh, J. L. Yaryan, A. Hor- 
ney, J. P. Iliff, F. W. Hoffman, H. T. Yaryan, R. R. Van- 
sant, J. Burr Williams, H. E. Fisher, J. J. Finney, I. A. 
Gormon, E. M. Parker, H. W. Deuker, C. P. Peterson, W. 
J. Robie, M. J. Davy, H. Stein and T. Atkinson. The offi- 
cers, installed Oct. 2, 1879, were: Homer Yaryan. C. C. ; 
E. M. Parker, P. C; A. H. Morehead, V. C. ; A. E. Crocker, 
Prel.; J. J. Finney, M. of F. ; W. H. Stanley, M. of E.; H. 
W. Wilke, K. of R. & S.; H. E.Fisher, M. at A; A. Inglish, 
LG.; J. B. Hill,0. G. The present membership is about sev- 
enty-eight. The lodge meets every Thursday evening in the 



116 HISTORY OF WAYNE COUNTY. 

hall, corner of Seventh and Main streets. The present officers 
are: J. H. Crooke, C. C; P. S. Hearne, P. C. ; Geo. S. Need- 
ham, Y. C; M. Eitchie, K. of R & 'S.; O. S. Mote, M. of 
F. ; A. H. Morehead, M. of E. ; W. B. Dormer, M. at A. ; H. 
W. Deuker, Prel. ; John Thomas, I. G. ; J. O. Wisner, O. G. ; 
Trustees, K C.Tompkins, H. W. Deuker and J. B. Hill. 
Germania Lodge^ No. 115, K. of P-, was organized March 
14, 1884, under the Grand Master of the State, with charter 
members as follows: Fred Besselman, Georsje Glande, Her- 
man Rost, John F. Grotlendick, Frank Bescher, Lewis Uhte, 
John W. F. Oesting, Henry Fellman, W. H. Hawekotle, 
Fred Krone, Auo^ust H. May, Edward Hebbeler, George 
Eversman, Max A. PfeifFer, Frank Sauer, A. W. Meyer, Wm. 
Snrrendorf, Wm. Piehl, Charles Weisbrod, Fred Singer, 
Oscar Tauer, Henry Heischtield, Wm. Klopp, Wm. Hill, 
Henry Seeloth, Wm. Luebkemann, Chris. Lammert, Fred W. 
Stein, August Stafford, Henry J, Klopp, Herman Hoppe, 
Ernst Schiveier, Lewis Rapp, John Sostheimeier, Wra. 
Sclmltz, Michael Koepplinger, Fred Working, Fred Peine, 
Chris. Elstro, Matthew Peine, H. Marshall, Elwood Glander, 
Lewis Tangerman, Henry Hoff, John F. Steinkamp, John 
W. Knollenberg, Emil Huck, August Kamp, Edward Roser, 
Edward Klein, Isaac Shire and Allen W. Graves. The lodge 
meets in its hall over the Richmond National Bank, corner of 
Fifth and Main streets. The present officers are: James Nich- 
olson, P. C. ; Edward H. Miller, C. C. ; Wm. Russell, Y. G. , 
John M. Wampler, M. of E. ; B. C. Hill, M. of F.; E. E. 
Roney, I. G. ; W. Wentling, O. G.; E. E. King, M. at A.; 
Trustees, Daniel Hill, Harry Dill and Park R. Lackey. 

KNIGHTS OF HONOR. 

The Richmond Lodge of the Knights of Honor is No. 864. 
It was organized Jan. 25, 18T8, with the following officers and 
charter members: C. A. Kersey, Past Dictator; C. F. Walters, 
Dictator; B. C. Hill, Yice-Dictator; W. H. Brandell, Assist- 
ant Dictator; F. M. Wheelan, Reporter; G. C. Williams, 
Treasurer; J. B. Hill, W. D. Reinhart, S. C. Shute, Jr., and 
Geo. H. Dunham. The lodge meets every Wednesday even- 
ing in its hall over Reid's hardware store, corner of Seventh 



* • OITY OF RICHMOND. 117 

and Main streets. It has at present forty members and the fol- 
lowing officers: Wm. Keiser, P. D.; Alex. Greenhoif, D. ; T. 
J. Dandig, Y. D.; W. L. Mott, A. D.; Frank Getzendanner, 
T.; Geo. J. Knollenberg, K. 

The Knights of Honor are a secret order, designed to be a 
mutual benefit association. The order has 165,000 members 
in the United States, in number ranking third among the 
various secret orders. 

AMERICAN PROVIDENT ASSOCIATION. 

Washington Lodge^ No. 6, A. P. A., was organized Nov. 
27, 1867, with officers and charter-members as follows: Wm. 
Bartel, W. M.; Louis Ulite, W. D. M.; Fred. Bartel, Eec. 
Sec; W. H. Hawekotte, Fin. Sec; Henry Yurgens, Treas. ; 
Fred. Jahnke, Cond.; Chas. Hebbeler, I. G. ; H. Schumaker, 
O. G.; H. H. Meerhoff, H. Schroeder, H. Postehr, F. Beck- 
man, H. Drifmeyer, H. Romberg, G. F. Kramer, H. Holt- 
kamp, Chas. Boescb, H. Kehlenbrink, F. Hollering, G. H. 
Westenberg, Aug. Kamp, Fred. Weking, A. Deitemeier, D. 
Nietert, F. Thomas, H. Bartel, B. Thomas, H. Frese, W. 
Kloker, Ed. Klute, Sr., and F. Knolman. 

The association is in the very best financial condition, and 
has a membership of seventy-five. Meetings are held on 
every Wednesday evening in the hall at the northwest corner 
of Fifth and Main streets. The present officers are: Wm. 
Hill, W. M.; Wm. Klopp, W. D. M.; Ernst Schweim, Eec 
Sec; H. Hawekotte, Fin. Sec; Fred. Jahnke, Asst. Sec; 
Louis Uhte, Treas.; Wm. Schultz, Cond.; H. Lupkeman, 
Asst. Cond.; Fred. Weking, L G.; H. Schumaker, O. G.; H. 
Klopp, Chap. 

BENEFIT ASSOCIATION. 

The German Mutual Benefit Association of Eichmond was 
organized July 13, 1856, with the following members: John 
Schuman, Anton Egli, Karl Hoelscher, Joachim Yuerges, 
Gottlieb Lichtenfels, Geo. L. Sperling, John Yogt, Karl 
Meier, Henry Emrich, John Bratz, E. Wessner,Fred. Baulus, 
Geo. Eigenbrod, Jacob Goehner, Louis Knopf. The first of- 
ficers were: Anton Effli, Pres. ; John Schuman, Sec; Jacob 



118 HISTORY OF WAYNE COUNTY. . * 

Goeliner, Trustee. The present officers are: Win. Stortz, 
Pres.; G. Liclitenfels, Sec; Raphael Miehle, Yice- President; 
Emil Kromer, Per. Sec; Trustees, L. Sciefner, H. Hasken- 
oster, E- Bettenbrock. 

KNIGHTS OF LABOR. 

Wayne AssemhJy, JT.of Z., No. 2,785, was organized Aug. 
10, 1883, with the following charter members and first of- 
ficers: A. C. Hill, 1. E. Balcom, Jos. Necker, John Watkins, 
Wm.iDallman,]Jos. E. Berge, 0. R. Barnes, Chas. Leva, Jos. 
E. Theise, M. Fitzgerald. Albert Hollepeter, Wm. Kahili, 
"Wm. Lawson, Adam Keller, Leonard Shober, 0. Q. Egbert, 
Henry Haner, Walter Webster, Oscar Millspaugh, Frank 
Kidd. Officers: J. B. Kulej, M. W.; M. Fitzgerald, W. F.; 
O. A.Lank, Y. S.; Wm. F. Dallman, W. L; Chas. Leva, 
Almoner; F. A. Kidd, R. S.; A. Hollepeter, F. S.; F. O. 
Frey, Treas.; F. A. Ward, S.; C. Q. Egberk, U. K.; F. C. 
Balcom, L G. ; Wm. Lawson, O. G. 

The present officers are: Walter Webster, M. W.; M. 
Fitzgerald, W. F.; John E. White, W. L; John B. Oaks, 
Almoner; A. B. Crump, F. S.; Geo. Lambert, Treas.; Otto 
Lank, S. ; John Miller, U. K. ; Wm. Lee, L G. ; Alex. Baiter, 
O. G. The lodge has now seventy -five members. 

GRAND ARMY OF THE REPUBLIC. 

Solomon Meredith Post, No. 55, G. A. R.^ is named in honor 
of one of Wayne County's distinguished soldiers and gallant 
officers. (See biography.) 

This post was organized March 29, 1882. The charter 
members and first officers were as follows: J. P. Hiff", P. C; 
J. F. Davenport, S. Y. C. ; J. F. Haner, J. Y. C; Geo. H. 
Poinner, Adjt. ; Lafe Larsh, Q. M. ; Rev, Lamport, Chap.; 
Walter Webster, O. D. ; Louis O. Shofer, O. G. ; Thaddeus 
O. Brafiett, Wm. Wasson, John B. Hogan, John Seiman, 
Conrad Krick, John H. Butterworth, W. H. Baylies, Wm. 
Alexander, Cal. W. Campbell, Richard Overhaults, John 
Boss, Wm. Green, J. T.- Smith. 

March 19, 1884, the post had 112 members. The place of 
meeting is in the old Tremont block. The following are the 



CITY OF KICHMOND. 119 

present officers: J. F. Davenport, Commander; D. W. Corn- 
stock, S. V. C. ; Joseph Rowlett, J. Y. C. ; Walter Webster, 
Adjt.; J. J. Finney, Q. M.; H. H. Fox, Chap.; Joseph Pol- 
lock, O. D. ; Freeman Carrington, O. G. 

MINERAL CABINET. 
CONTRIBUTED. 

The cabinet of Mrs. Mary P. Haines is worthy of mention 
embracing many thousands of specimens in the several de- 
partments of natural history, minerals, fossils, shells, birds, 
and botanical specimens; also many relies of Mound-Builders 
and other objects of interest from different parts of the world. 
Her collection has been pronounced by persons competent to 
judge, one of the finest and most extensive private collections 
in the State. 

The fossils of the Paleozoic rocks are well represented from 
the earliest recognized remains of organic life — the Eozoon 
Canadense of the Archaean period — to the Upper Coal Meas- 
ures. The Lower and Upper Silurian, Devonian, Sub-Carb. 
and Carboniferous formations being the most numerously 
represented. There are also many species from the later 
epochs, especially the Cretaceous and Tertiary, both of this 
and foreign countries, in all, some 1,500 species of fossils. 
The Conchological department contains some 1,500 species, 
including land and fresh-water shells from this and foreign 
countries, and marine shells from the Atlantic, Pacific, 
Indian and Southern oceans, among them some very unique 
and rare specimens. 

The minerals are many of them beautiful and valuable, 
and number over 1,000 specimens. Two cases of birds con- 
tain fifty specimens. Relics of Mound-Builders, various flint 
implements, beads, etc., and other Archeological specimens 
and objects of interest from foreign countries. In botany, the 
Cryptogams are largely represented by foreign, as well as na- 
tive species: Musci, 500 species. Filicies, over 400 species. 
Marine Algae, over 250 species, Lichens, over 250 species, 
and about 100 species of Hepaticae. 

Of Phanerogams, or flowering plants, the collection con- 
tains some 500 species. 



120 HISTORY OF WAYNE COUNTY. 



MOBRISSON LIBRARY. 



In the intellectual and moral world, as in nature, silent in- 
fluences and forces are often the most powerful. "The great 
means of self-education is through books — through much 
reading of books." Hence the history of a city, township, 
county or State would be sadly incomplete ifit failed to give 
an account of its libraries. 

Robert Morrisson, the founder of the library which bears 
his name, was born in Orange, now AUaraance, County, 
N, C, on the 19th day of October, 1786, and removed 
to the present locality of the city of Richmond in the 
spring of 1810, at which time the present site of the city was 
an almost unbroken wilderness. From that time his resi- 
dence remained unchanged, and he was ever a prominent and 
active participant in the enterprises which have converted 
a mere wild into a city of 20,000 inhabitants. His energy, 
integrity, and devotion to business resulted in the accumula- 
tion of a handsome fortune. The poor of our city will bear 
grateful testimony to his liberality and kindness of heart. 
But these gifts to the needy, although numerous and liberal, 
did not satisfy his benevolence; and believing that a public 
library would be more conducive to the public good than any 
other expenditure of the same amount of means, he purchased 
lot 35, in that part of the city laid out by Jeremiah Cox, cor- 
ner of Broadway and Marion streets, and erected a library 
building thereon. The building contains, in addition to the 
library-room, a dwelling for the librarian, and an office for 
the township trustee, and the library committee. 

The library-room is arranged and fitted up in the most ap- 
proved modern style. The cost of the lot and improvements 
was $12,500. 

He then placed in the hands of a committee, consisting of 
Jesse P. Siddall, Jesse S. Wilson, John Nicholson, Timothy 
Nicholson and Dr. O. P. Baer, the sum of $5,000, which 
they were to appropriate in purchasing books, to be placed in 
the building erected by him. He had previously invested 
$500 in books, which are now in the library. The total dona- 
tion for lot, improvements and books, amounts to $18,000, all 



CITY OF RICHMOND, 



121 



of which he devised to "Wayne Township, of Wayne Co 
Ind, in trust, for the benefit of the inhabitants of said 
township forever. The township library is placed in the same 
room, and will form a part of "the Morrisson Library." 

The library is placed under the control of a library com- 
mittee, consisting of four persons; which committee is to 
adopt the by-laws, rules and regulations, appoint the libra- 
rian, purchase books, and have the general supervision of the 
library and buildings. The committee consists of James W. 
Smith, as Township Trustee, and Jesse P. Siddall, Lydia J 
Morrisson and Timothy Nicholson. The Township Trustee 
shall always constitute one of the committee. Yacancies in 
the committee are to be filled as follows: The first vacancy, 
by the township trustee; and the next two vacancies by the 
"common council" of the city of Richmond. Afterward, 
whenever a vacancy occurs, it is to be filled by the trustee or 
council, whichever made the prior appointment then vacant, 
so that two of said committee will always have their appoint- 
ment from the council, and one from the township trustee. ' 
Any member of the committee may be removed by the con- 
current action of the trustee and a majority of the council. 

In case the trustee or council, or either of them, at any 
time fail, neglect or refuse to perform the duties assigned 
them, then the judge of the Wayne Circuit Court, or of any 
other court of. record in said county, is to perform the duties 
assigned to the defaulting party or parties. Said real estate 
and books being devised for the use of the inhabitants of said 
township forever, the judge aforesaid is empowered to do 
whatever may be necessary to enforce its appropriation to the 
uses specified. 

Thus, by the munificence of one of its citizens, the town- 
ship is now the owner of a permanent public library, the use 
of which is free to all of its inhabitants. 

A life-sized portrait painting of the donor hangs on the 
western wall of the library room. This was purchased by 
contributions from our citizens. 

The library, in July, 1864, opened with about 6,000 vol- 
umes of books, which number has been increased to more 
than 12,000. 



■J22 HISTORY OF WAYNE COUNTY 

The '* Manual Labor and Working Men's Institnte," of this 
city, influenced solely by a generous desire to promote the 
public good, removed their valuable library to the same 
building, and it forms a part of the Morrisson Library. 

The library committee adopted the following Rules and 
Regulations for the government of the library: 



RULES. 



1. The officers of the Morrisson Library shall be a presi- 
dent, vice-president, treasurer, secretary and librarian, all 
of whom, except the librarian, shall be members of the 
library committee. 

2. The library shall be open daily, except on Sundays, 
Christmas, New Year, Fourth of July and Thanksgiving, 
from 9 to 12, and from 1 to 5 o'clock. It shall also be open 
on Saturday evening from 6 to 8 o'clock, specially for me- 
chanics and business men. 

3. The librarian shall keep a catalogue of the books, 
. properly number and arrange the same; keep the room and 

books in good order; an entry of books taken from the 
library and their return, and the name and residence of the 
persons taking the same; note down fines and penalties for 
the injury, destruction or overkeeping of books; see that the 
rules governing the library are enforced; collect all fines and 
penalties; carefully examine returned books, and note down 
any injury to or defacement thereof; have the "exclusive right 
to take books from the shelves, and replace them when re- 
turned; keep the cases locked and permit no one to handle 
books on the shelves; label the books; place on each book 
the number of the case to which it belongs, and the number 
of the shelf and the number of the book on the shelf; at each 
monthly meeting of the committee report in writing all vio- 
lations of these rules, also all volumes needing repairs, or un- 
fit for use; record the names of donors of books and a list ot 
the books donated by each person, which donation shall be 
acknowledged by the committee through the city papers; 
make an annual report of the condition of the library to the 
committee at their August meeting. 
4. If any person lose, deface or injure a book, or set of 



CITY OF KICHMOND. 



123 



books, he shall make compensation therefor to the librarian 
and if such book be one of a set, he shall either replace the 
set or pay the full value thereof, and may then receive the re- 
maining volumes as his property. 

5. Writing or marking in a book, or turning down any 
portion of a leaf, is prohibited, and the librarian shall assess 
a fine therefor. 

6. Heads of families and their children under eighteen 
years of age are entitled to not more than four volumes at 
the same time, and single persons to one, to be retained 
twenty- one days; and a fine of five cents per week or fraction 
of a week, for each volume, shall be paid for detention longer 
than the time allowed. 

7. No person shall be permitted to take a book from the 
library so long as any fine assessed against him remains 
unpaid. 

8. Parents or guardians sending small children to the li- 
brary must send an order with them to ensure a book. 

9. Such books as may be designated by the library com-- 
mittee shall not be taken from the library-room, but be kept 
as works of reference, and consulted there only, except by 
permission of the library committee. 

10. No smoking or chewing will be allowed in the library- 
room. 

11. Books detained one week longer than allowed shall 
be sent for by the librarian, and the expense incurred be as- 
sessed against the person guilty of such detention. 

12. Juvenile books will not be exchanged until they have 
been kept three days. 

13. Books must be selected from the catalogue, and the 
selection should be made before coming to the library; and 
the case, shelf, number and name of the book written down 
and furnished to the librarian, just as they are printed in 
the catalogue. 

14. Catalogues will be furnished by the librarian for SO- 
cents each. 

15. Persons taking books from the library shall not loan 
them to others. 

16. Any person who repeatedly and willfully violates the 
rules of the library will be excluded from its use. 



1$4 HISTORY OF WAYNE COUNTY. 

IT, No book taken out shall be renewed until the expira- 
tion of one week from the date of its return. 

18. Persons between the ages of eighteen and twenty-one 
years, and anyone under eighteen whose parents are non-resi- 
dents, shall be entitled to a book upon furnishing the secre- 
tary with a satisfactory written guarantee for compliance with 
the rules. 

19. No person shall be entitled to the use of the library 
who is not a resident of the township. 

In 1876 a complete catalogue of all the books in the library 
was published. This catalogue is arranged on the "Diction 
ary plan.'' Each book is entered under the author, subject 
and title, and the whole arranged in one alphabetical series, 
containing over 300 octavo pages. Three supplementary 
catalogues of " additions " have also besn published and dis- 
tributed gratuitously to the patrons of the library. 

The library was opened in July, 1864, with Jesse H. Brown 
for Librarian. A few weeks after the opening he was appointed 
Superintendent of the Richmond City schools, and he resigned 
his position as Librarian. Mrs. Sarah A. Wrigley was then 
chosen Librarian, an office which she has ever since filled with 
great satisfaction and unusual efficiency. 

For the first sixteen years, viz., from 1864 to 1880, the only 
income available for the purchase of new books was that 
arising from the rent paid by the Librarian for her apart- 
ments, and the fines collected for violations of the library 
rules; and during this period the average number per annum 
of new volumes purchased was only 200. 

The State Legislature in 1879 passed an act directing the 
township trustees to levy a small tax for the purchase of 
books, and for the last four years an average of 600 volumes 
per annum have been added to the library. 

In 1871 there were only 1,475 names on the Register. Last 
year the list of readers numbered 4,688, to whom were issued 
53,339 books. 

The library-room is literally filled with books, and the com- 
mittee will soon be compelled to enlarge the building to secure 
room for future purchases. 

The library has been very useful in the education of the 



CITY OF RICHMOND. 125. 

present generation, and its increasing injauenqe will do far 
more in the future, both for the general public and for the 
public schools of the township. 

In the Librarian's report for 1881 she says : " Our readers 
exhibit unabated interest. Every year shows a more thorough 
appreciation of library privileges. Books of reference are 
coming into general use, and the school children are learning 
to consult histories and biographies in connection with their 
studies. Lives of prominent men, stories founded on Amer- 
ican history and late books of travels have to some extent 
taken the place of sensational stories." And in her report for 
1883 is this statement: " Reading clubs and societies for intel- 
lectual improvement are rapidly increasing in the township, 
and they frequently exhaust our collection of books on a given 
subject." Thus has Morrisson Library increased in usefulness 
and popularity as a model institution, and we trust its com- 
mittee and its patrons will heartily unite in measures which 
shall render its growth and value in the future far greater 
than in the past. 

LUNATIC ASYLUM. 

Richmond having secured the location of the State Lunatic 
Asylum, which is to be commenced the present year, 1884, 
the following description from a Richmond paper will not be 
out of place here: 

The commission to locate and construct the new insane 
asylum adopted the cottage plan for the Richmond insti- 
tution, and it will be arranged for 400 patients. The main 
building will have a frontage of 500 feet and will be two 
stories high, with an attic. The center will be an open court 
with an administration building in front, and a cooking, bak- 
ing, etc., department in the rear on the ground floor, and the 
chapel or amusement hall above. The wings will be for 
patients under observation when first admitted, one for men 
and the other for women. Each wing will have two wards 
and each ward will accommodate twenty-three patients. As 
soon as classified the patients will be sent to one of the 
cottages, of which there are to be sixteen, with a capacity of 
about twenty inmates each. These cottages are to be scattered 



126 



HISTORY OF WAYNE COUNTY. 



over the ground in the rear of the main building, conforming 
to an irregular indented circle about 1,000 feet in diameter, 
and so situated as to be under easy observation. No two of 
these cottages will have the same architectural appearance 
and each will be planned to care for a particular class or grade 
of patients . 

The commission has been animated by a desire to give the 
cottage system such an opportunity to veriff its claim to supe- 
riority as it has not had anywhere in the world before. At 
other places cottages have not entertained all classes of the 
insane, but the Richmond asylum is to have the honor of 
demonstrating whether the plan is competent to successfully 
manage all classes and grades of unsound minds, as the insti- 
tution will be required to receive and take care of all appli- 
cants. 




CHAPTER y. 



THE CHURCHES OF RICHMOND. 



History of Methodism. — Grace Methodist Episcopal 
Church. — German Methodist Episcopal Church. — Afri- 
can Methodist Episcopal Church. — African Wesleyan 
Methodist Church. — Society of Friends, 1. — Society of 
Friends, 2. — St. Paul's Episcopal Church. — First Presby 
TERiAN Church. — United Presbyterian Church. — New 
Jerusalem Church. — First Baptist Church. — Mt. Mo- 
RiAH Baptist Church. — Christian Church. — Evangelical 
Lutheran Church. — St. Paul's Evangelical Lutheran 
Church. — Zion's Church. — Catholic Churches. 

the history of METHODISM. 

Methodism was introduced to the city of Richmond, Ind., 
under the preaching of Rev. Russell Bigelow, in the year 1822. 
It was difficult to obtain a house in which to hold a Methodist 
meeting, but at length permission was granted to hold such 
services in a small school-house. There Mr. Bigelow preached 
his first sermon, and organized a class of seven members. 
Geo. Smith was appointed leader. It was not long until the 
school-house was taken from them. Preaching and class-meet- 
ings were then removed to a small room occupied by Mrs. 
Pearson as a dwelling. A short time after this Mrs. Pearson 
moved away from the city and the class was discontinued. 

In the autumn of 1825 Rev. James Havens determined 
to make another effort to establish Methodism in Richmond. 
A small house in the lower end of town, remote from any 
other residence, occupied by Isaac Jackson as a dwelling, was 
obtained and preaching established and a class organized. 
From that period Methodism has maintained a place in Rich- 
mond. , 

137 



128 HISTORY OF WAYNE COUNTY. 

The first two days' meeting was held on Saturday and Sun- 
day, June, 1828. Stephen E.. Beggs who had pastoral charge 
appointed the meeting, and was assisted by several local 
preachers. In the course of events it became necessary to 
vacate the room which was occupied by the meetings and a 
small house occupied by James Henry was next obtained. 
This house was soon found to be too small. The male mem- 
bers were called together, a subscription was taken, and a 
small frame church built on the site of what has since been 
known as Pearl St. M. E. Church. Richmond was made a 
station in 1838. The membership at this date numbered 
sixty-five in and around the town. There were three classes, 
of which D. B. Crawford, Joseph Kern and Stephen Thomas 
were the respective leaders. The following ministers have 
served as pastors, in the order in which they are named 
since Richmond became a station: John W. Sullivan, A. 
Tarkington, J. H. Hull, R. S. Robinson, A. Conwell, W. 
W. Wheeler, J. M. Stagg, C. W. Miller, J. H. Hull (2d 
term). Dr. Wm. H. Goode, Thomas Webb, J. W. Stafford, S. 
C. Cooper, Augustus Eddy, "V. M. Beamer, H. N. Barnes, Ja- 
cob Colclazer, J. W. T. McMullen, Dr. T. S. Johnson (now 
missionary in India), Dr. C. N. Sims, N. H. Phillips, R. 
Tobey, J. y. R. Miller, N. Gillam, R. H. Sparks, W. J. 
Vigres, A. W. Lamport. 

Since the organic law of the Methodist Episcopal church 
went into efi'ect in the year 1864, by which the pastoral term 
was lengthened to three years, ever3' pastor in charge of the 
original church, beginning with the name of R. Tobey, has 
served a full term of three years. 

In the year 1858 the old frame building was removed to 
South Tenth street, where it may still be seen and where it is 
now occupied as a dwelling, and a new brick church was 
erected on the old site. The annual session of the North 
Indiana Conference was held in the new church in the au- 
tumn of 1853 at which time the church was dedicated by the 
presiding Bishop, E. R. Ames. Under the pastorate of Rev. 
N. H. Phillips the parsonage, which had been erected some 
years before on the lot adjoining the church, was enlarged 
and beautified at an expense of about $1,200. In 1866, under 



CITY OF RICHMOND. 129 

the labors of Kev. R. Tobey, the church was completely 
renovated, painted outside, remodeled inside, the lecture- 
room re-seated, walls frescoed, and new carpets provided at 
an expense of about $3,500. Under the labors of Rev. R. 
H. Sparks, a hurricane blew in the west end of the church 
building doing much damage to the interior. The damages 
were promptly repaired. During the pastorate of Rev. W. 
J. Yigres a complete renovation and refurnishing of the 
church occurred. The auditorium was newly frescoed and 
furnished with new seats, the windows reshaped and stained 
glass put in. The expense for these improvements was about 
$2,700. Under the labors of Rev. A. W. Lamport, the par- 
sonage was again repaired, new rooms were added in brick, 
the old rooms were modified and modernized, the whole cost- 
ing the sum of $1,240. During the third year of his service 
as pastor the trustees were encouraged to undertake the erec- 
tion of a new church edifice at a point further east in the 
city. Lots were accordingly purchased on the southwest cor- 
ner of Main and Fourteenth streets. The location is admitted 
to be one of the finest in Richmond. The new edifice is already 
under way. It is unique and modern in its style of architect- 
ure and wholly unlike any other church in the city. The 
auditorium, which will seat about 500, and the lecture-room, 
which will accommodate about 700, are both on ground floor, 
and so arranged as to open together by means of folding 
doors, thus furnishing a seating capacity for about twelve 
to thirteen hundred people. The lecture-room is divided 
into one main room, a spacious gallery and four smaller 
rooms, which are well adapted to the service of Sunday- 
schools. The basement, which extends under the whole 
building, will be finished into church-parlors^ dining-room, 
furnace-rooms, etc. The building will be surmounted by 
a graceful steeple about 150 feet high. A church office 
is in connection with the auditorium and choir gallery. The 
floor in the auditorium is made on an incline toward the 
pulpit. The building is of pressed brick with stone flnish 
and will probably be heated with steam. The roof is of 
slate, and the whole finish without and within will be as com- 
plete as possible. The entire expense of the building, in- 



130 HISTORY OF WAYNE COUNTY. 

eluding wells, cistern, walks, fencing, carpets and great 
organ, will probably not exceed $40,000. For the conven- 
ience of those living at a distance, carriage-sheds will be pro- 
vided. In closing this brief history it can truthfully be said 
that the First Methodist Episcopal Church which is now the 
outgrowth, both in name and fact, of the original Methodist 
Society of Richmond, remains in a healthful and hopeful con- 
dition. Its members are united in faith and feeling, and in 
the purpose to hand over the present strength of their society 
to a grander and even more blessed career in the future. 
Many extensive revivals and wonderful ingatherings of mem- 
bers have occurred during the history of this church thus far. 
Prominent among them are those which occurred under the 
pastorates of Revs. R. S. Robinson, C. N. Sims, R. Tobey. 
In the month of August, 1858, forty-two members withdrew 
from the original church and organized a new society under 
the name of Union Chapel, now known as Grace Church. In 
the autumn of 1866 forty members more withdrew and or- 
ganized a third society. After a short career this society dis- 
banded and its membership was merged into the other two 
churches. 

GRACE METHODIST EPISCOPAL CHURCH. 

This church was originally an offshoot from Pearl Street 
(now First) Church, forty-two of its members having with- 
drawn on account of the restriction in regard to seatingr and 
on the 24th day of August, 1858, organized a new society 
known as " Union Chapel." They purchased a building on 
Main street, having business rooms below and a large hall- 
room above, fitting up the latter for church purposes. It was 
dedicated, Sept. 26, 1858, D. W. Clark (afterward Bishop) 
officiating. The congregatiou continued to worship in this 
house until Jan. 24, 1869, at which time, the old building 
having been disposed of, a new one, erected the year 
previous, more commodious and more eligibly situated, was 
ready to be occupied in part. On the 26th of September of 
the same year, the whole house being completed, it was for- 
mally dedicated by Bishop Ames, and the name changed to 
' ' Grace Church." 



CITY OF RICHMOND. 131 

This building occupies the southwest corner of Tenth and 
North A streets, and is a beautiful and imposing structure of 
the Gothic order of architecture. It is brick and stands upon 
the ground 100 x 54 feet, two stories, slate roof, surmounted 
bj a graceful belfry and spire 130 feet in height. The audi- 
ence-room on the second floor is capable of seating 700 per- 
sons. The walls and ceiling are handsomely frescoed in oil, 
which with the stained-glass windows, wood-work finish of 
varnished ash, gives the interior a highly ornamental and 
artistic appearance. It contains a very fine-toned organ with 
1,075 pipes and twenty-four stops. The basement is conven- 
iently arranged for Sunday-school and prayer-meeting pur- 
poses, being seated with chairs and having an ample supply 
of private rooms for church and Sabbath-school classes. 

The cost of the building, including site, was about $40,000, 
and improvements have since been added to the value of be- 
tween $3,000 and $4,000. 

At its first organization a portion of the seats were owned 
by members, which gave it the name of " pewed church," 
but this feature becoming unpopular, it was abandoned at 
the opening of the new house of worship. The seats are now 
entirely free. 

This church has enjoyed the ministrations ot some of the 
most talented and popular pastors of the North Indiana Con- 
ference, to which it is attached. Rev. J. Y. R. Miller served 
from its first organization until the spring of 1860; Rev. F. 
A. Hardin, one year, until the spring of 1861; Rev. A. Green- 
man, one year, until the spring of 1862; Rev. W. H. Goode, 
one year, until the spring of 1863; Rev. A. S. Kinnan, two 
years, until the spring of 1865; Rev. William Wilson, three 
months following, when he resigned; Rev. A. Marine came 
to fill out the conference year on the 13th of November, and 
remained until the spring of 1868; Rev. A. S. Kinnan, a 
former pastor, returned, remaining about a year and a half, 
when he resigned; Rev. E. B. Snyder came on the 5th of Jan- 
uary, 1870, to supply the vacancy, and continued until the 
1st "of October, 1871, when he was transferred; Rev. A. A. 
Brown, sent to fill out the year, remained until July, 1872, 
when he resigned, and the Rev. S. L. Yourtee, sent to fill out 



132 HISTORY OF WAYNE COUNTY. 

the year, was superseded in the spring of 1873 by Rev. R. 
N. McKaig, who remained until the spring of 1876; Rev. A. 
Marine, a former pastor, followed, remaining until tlie spring 
of 1879; Rev. H. A. Buchtel, three years, until the spring ot 
1882; Rev. Frost Craft succeeded, and continues pastor at 
this date (January, 1884). 

From the small beginning the membership of this church 
has steadily increased until it now numbers 440. During its 
short history there have been three or four revivals of religion 
worthy of mention: One in the winter of 1865-'66, under the 
ministry of A. Marine, when about forty persons were added, 
to the membership; one in the spring of 1869, under A. S. 
Kinnan, when 174 were added; one in the winter of 1881-'82, 
under H. A. Buchtel, when about thirty were added; and 
one in the winter of 1882-'83, under Frost Craft, when 114 
were added. 

The Sabbath-school of the church, organized at the com- 
mencement, has had a very prosperous career, gradually in- 
creasing in numbers until it now has an average attendance 
of about 400 scholars and teachers. It has had in all five 
superintendents, C. C. Binkley, now in charge, occupying 
that position for nearly fifteen years. 

GERMAN M. E. CHURCH. 

This church was organized in the year 1860. The members, 
some thirteen in number, met at the house of Mr. Fiske, 
on South Seventh street, and in 1861 built a church edifice on 
the corner of Sixth and B streets. This continued only one 
year, when the church society disbanded and was not again 
reorganized until 1871. The association then erected a brick 
church on the corner of B and Seventh streets, at a cost of 
$5,000. It had the above membership of thirteen, of which 
the only survivors are: Frederick Hutfielder and wife, and 
Wm. Gauding and wife. 

The church has not grown much in membership, but it has 
a large and influential congregation who attend its service, 
many of which should join and add their influence for good 
to the noble few now united together for the good of the 
church. 



CITY OF RICHMOND. 133 

The ministers wlio have officiated as pastors are: Eevs. 
William Dimkard, Batrim Weaver, Helwish, Fricken, Martin, 
Fishback and SchrufF; the last two are still with them. 

The present membership is eighteen, 

AFKICAN M. E. CHURCH. 

This is the oldest colored church in the city, the organiza- 
tion being effected in 1845, Their first meeting was in an 
old log dwelling on South Fifth street. Later an old frame 
building was secured for a season, and then service was held 
at the residences of the members for something like two 
years. 

In 1858 they purchased an old frame building and moved 
it to South Sixth street, where the colored school now stands, 
and, putting it in comfortable repair, used it for ten years as 
a place of worship. 

In 1868 they took possession of the church on the corner of 
Sixth and B streets. Their church is a good and substantial 
brick building, the property being valued at $5,000. It 
will seat comfortably some 300 persons. 

The organization began with a membership of fifteen, four 
of whom are yet living, viz. : Henry Belle, Nathaniel Jones, 
Eliza Outland, Eliza Ladd; and the charter members who are 
not living, are as follows: William Davisson and wife, Cor- 
nelius Overman and wife, Charles Overman and wife, Adam 
Carpenter and wife, George Belle, Fannie Olbertson, Eichard 
Rush, Matild Rush, Mary Overman, Milton Ladd, Sharlotta 
Benbow. 

The ministers who have had charge of the pastorate, and 
have worked to enlarge its sphere of usefulness are as follows, 
in the order named. They are all that were remembered: 

Revs. Robert Jones, Mrs. Ross, Mrs. Bass, Daniel Wins- 
low, Thomas Strawther, William C. Travan, Frederick My- 
ers, C. C. Joiner, Daniel Winslow (second term), Nathan 
Michum, Johnston Michum, Nathan Michum (second term), 
J. M. Townson, A. T. Hall, Dr. Willis Revels, W. S. Lank- 
ford, L. D. Crosby, W. C. Travan (second term), J. McSmith 
and C. H. Thomas, present pastor. 

This church has a membership at present of 186, and was 
organized by the Rev. Bishop William* Paul Qainn. 



134 HISTORY OF WAYNE COUNTY. 

WESLEYAN METHODIST CHURCH — COLORED. 

There arose a division in the African Methodist church upon 
school matters, which resulted in April, 1868, in a division, a 
few of the members leaving, and the above-named church was 
formed by Elder C. W. Clemens, deceased. In its early history 
it applied to the Miami Conference of the "Wesleyan Methodists 
of America for admission, and were accepted, and still hold 
their membership. The church is congregational in its form 
of government, their preachers being chosen by the church 
without definite limits as to the length of their pastorates. 

At the time of its organization but four members united, 
viz.: Joseph and Caroline Moore, Wm. Green and Benj.. 
Pickett, Mr. Jos. Moore serving as Class Leader for several 
years, and until his death. Mrs. Caroline Moore, called the 
mother of the church, is now the only member living of the 
original four, and furnished the facts of which this history is 
composed. 

The organization was at the house of Mr. Moore, but they 
now have a neat frame church building and a handsome par- 
sonage. The church is 32 x 42 in size with a vestibule 8 x 12 
feet. It is neatly finished and furnished, and lighted with 
ten gas jets. There is yet due on the church property a little 
over $800, but with a present membership of nearly sixty, 
they hope to be soon free from debt. 

A regularly organized Board of Trustees belong to this 
church as follows: Steven Riley, T. H. Johnson, D. Eckels, 
Joseph Rolston, Amon Dunken, Frank Rolston and William 
Freeman. Mr. J. C. Moore is the efficient church Clerk. 

Connected with this church is a thriving Sabbath-school, 
numbering between sixty and seventy pupils, with the follow- 
ing competent corps of officers, viz.: Mr. T. H. Johnson, Su- 
perintendent, with Miss Lucy Reid, Assistant; Organist, Prof. 
O. C. Huddleson; Secretaries, Miss Emma Moore and Miss 
Julia Garrett; Treasurer, Miss Sarah Johnson; Bible Class, 
No. 1, taught by Elder S. M. Smothers; Bible Class, No. 2, 
taught by Mrs. Lydia Hunter; Infant Class, No. 3, taught by 
Mrs. Annie Young; Class No. 4, taught by Mrs. Mary Mc- 
Kinney; Class No. 5, taught by Miss Lizzie Moore. The 
school meets at 2 o'clock p. m., every Sabbath. 



CITY OF RICHMOND. 135 

Pastors serving this church in succession from its organi- 
zation have been as follows: Elder C. W. Clemens, two 

years; Rev. Gleason, one year; Eev. Silas French, one 

year and six months; Rev. Anday Ferguson, one year; Rev. 
A. A. Dison, six months; Rev. Adam Collens, six months; 

Rev. Brookshare, two years; Rev. S. M. Sane, one year; 

Elder C. W. Clemens, two years; Elder H. C. Pierce, three 
years, and Elder S. M. Smothers, the present pastor, who took 
charge Sept. 24, 1883. 

PRESENT BOARD OF STEWARDS. 

W.T. Ganes, T. H. Johnson, S. Riley, Mrs. Caroline Moore, 
Mrs. N. A. Moore, Mrs. Martha Ralson, Mrs. Lydia Hunter 

THE SOCIETY OF FRIENDS. 1. 

The Society of Friends is the oldest established Christian 
denomination in Richmond or Wayne County, being, in fact 
co-equal with the settlement of the county. In February, 
1806, David Hoover and three other young men, all mem- 
bers of the Society of Friends, reached the vicinity of Rich- 
mond and Mr. Hoover located, remaining on his farm until 
his death, only a few years since. In August of the year 
1806 Jeremiah Cox and a few others of the denomination of 
Friends joined the first settlers, Mr. Cox locating on the 
land upon which the principal part of Richmond now stands, 
north of Main street, and which he laid out. 

In the fall of 1806, November, John Simpson, a member 
of the society, held a meeting at the cabin of Jeremiah Cox 
which was attended by about twenty persons. This was the 
initial movement of the society to form a closer union, which 
continued at intervals until the following summer of 1807. 
Then a Friends' meeting was commenced in a cabin upon 
Jeremiah Cox's land, and was kept up until duly established 
by the church. In August, 1807, this meeting was "in- 
dulged " by the West Branch Monthly Meeting. There were 
then eighty-four members, old and young, thirty-five of whom 
attended the first "indulged" meeting. It continued to be 
held as such until 1809, when the Whitewater Monthly 
Meeting was established by the Miami Quarterly Meeting. 



136 HISTORY OF WAYNE COEJNTY. 

Iq the fall of 1808 a meeting-house was erected, the first 
in the county, of logs, twenty-four feet square, near the south- 
east corner of the old burying-ground of the Friends. Not 
long afterward an addition was built to this church, also 
of logs and of the same dimensions, and this place of worship 
was used until the erection of a new building in the year 
1827. At the time of this enlargement, late in the year of 

1808, there were 248 members belonging to the meeting, of 
all ages, and the society had. a visit from the Rev. Stephen 
Grellet, who preached an interesting sermon from the text, 
" Children, have ye any meat?" On the 30th of September, 

1809, the Whitewater Monthly Meeting was opened, and 
was the first established meeting held in Indiana, and there 
were 265 Friends, old and young, then residing in Richmond 
and vicinity. In the year 1811 Thomas Roberts removed to 
Whitewater and settled on the farm where his son Jonathan 
now lives, and upon which the new Yearly Meeting house 
stands. He died in 1840 aged eighty-two years. Sam'l Charles, 
another prominent Friend, settled on a farm now occupied by 
his grandsons in part, in 1812. His death occurred in 1849, 
aged ninety-one years. Chas. Moffitt was another early pioneer 
of the church, a son-in-law of Jeremiah Cox. His home was the 
farm on which the old log church was built. He came in 
1811, and died in 1845, in the seventy-third year of his age. 
In the monthof June, 1812, the West Branch Quarterly Meet- 
ing was established by the Baltimore Yearly Meeting, and 
Whitewater Monthly Meeting was attached thereto, which 
caused the members of the latter to make a journey of forty 
miles, nearly due east, to attend the Quarterly Meeting. The 
Ohio Yearly Meeting was organized in 1817. 

In the year 1815, nine years after the first settlement of 
Friends, the Whitewater Monthly Meeting was composed of 
the following subordinate meetings, viz.: Whitewater, West 
Grove, Silver Creek, Middle Fork, Elkhorn and Chester, and 
numbered 165 families, 800 to 900 members, with four or five 
recorded ministers. 

The first Constitution of Indiana, adopted at Corydon, the. 
then capital, sat nineteen days, and Jeremiah Cox was one of 
the members of the convention. The same year Richmond 
was laid off by John Smith. 



CITY OF RICHMOND. 137 

On the 4th of January, 1817, the Whitewater Quarterly 
Meeting was held. Of this meeting William Williams, in his 
journal, said: " On the first day of the first month, 1817, there- 
was a new Quarterly Meeting opened at Wliitewater meeting- 
house, which was a great satisfaction to many minds; yet we 
felt sorry to part with our dear Friends of West Branch, a 
number of whom were present." 

On the 8tli of October, 1821, the Indiana Yearly Meeting 
was established and held. Benjamin Hopkins was Clerk, and 
George Carter, Assistant. It was composed of five Quarterly 
Meetings, viz.: Miami, West Branch, Fairfield, Whitewater 
and Blue Kiver It was held in the old log meeting-house, 
and in the shed attached to it. The increase in members 
caused a desire to erect a new and more commodious place of 
worship, and it took shape in the appointment of a committee, 
or Board of Managers, viz. : Jeremiah Cox, Samuel Charles 
and Thomas Roberts, and a plan for a house was adopted. 
This plan was chaiiged the following year, 1822, and John 
Charles added to the committee. The latter and Jeremiah 
Cox resigned the following year, and Charles Mofiitt was 
added, the board being then composed of the following named 
Friends: Samuel Charles, Thomas Roberts and Charles 
MoflStt, who continued to act until the building was completed 
in 1829. They kept a minute account of the expenditures, 
making their report in detail, and this account is in the pos. 
session of the grandchildren of Mr. Samuel Charles. The 
house was first occupied in an unfinished condition, in 1824. 
The board faithfully carried out their trust, and the cost was 
about $7,000 in round numbers. In 1826 the Yearly Meeting 
authorized the holding of Quarterly Meetings, held at White- 
water, at the Yearly Meeting house. From the meetings thus 
established there has since been three large Yearly Meetings 
set off: Western, Iowa and Kansas, having 25,000 to 30,000 
members. 

The present Indiana Yearly Meeting is composed of thirteen 
Quarterly Meetings, and has a membership of 18,000. 

The Whitewater Monthly Meeting at present consists of the 
following preparative meetings, viz. : Whitewater, Richmond 
(held on South Eighth street), and Twelfth Street, all in the 
10 



138 HISTOKY OF WAYNE COUNTY. 

city of Richmond; Smyrna, a few miles north, and Orange, a 
few miles south of the city, all of which have from time to 
time been esitablished by the old original meeting. The 
Monthly Meeting has a total membership of about 1,200. 

The Whitewater Quarterly Meetings are held in the city of 
Kichmond, in June and December, composed of five Monthly 
Meetings, all of which are in Wayne County, except one, and 
have a membership of 2,500. Two other meetings arc held 
at Dublin, and one at Xew Garden, all in Wayne County. 
The New Garden Meeting consists of three Monthly Meetings? 
and about 1,200 members, which shows in the county of 
Wayne, where the Friends first settled in Indiana, a member- 
ship of 3,700 at this time, or Jan. 1, 1884. 

These facts have been given us by Elijah Coffin, and in clos- 
ing his memorandum he said in substance: "That the Society 
of Friends unite with the views of most of the orthodox 
churches in all the essentials and fundamental doctrines of 
Christianity. They believe in the freedom of public worship. 
In the early days of the Christian Church the first gospel 
messenger was a woman, and they believe that women were 
called equally with men to preach the gospel. The result of 
200 years' experience has been to the effect that they are 
equally efficient. Women can be ministers and be none the 
less loving as mothers, wives and daughters. Theirs, the 
Society of Friends, was a gospel of peace; hence their mem- 
bers cannot enlist in the armies of the world. If called upon 
to fight, the reply should be : ' We are Christians and cannot 
fight. It is better to obey the laws of God than man, and 
leave the reward to God.' 

" The society stands firmly opposed to the death penalty, be- 
lieving man has no right to take that which he cannot bestow. 
It also takes strong grounds in favor of temperance. From 
the earliest days of its historj'^ we have taught that the traffic 
in liquors should be restricted to its use for medical and 
mechanical purposes. The society feel it to be the duty of 
its members to co-operate with any movement that has for its 
•object the suppression of the vice of intemperance." The value 
of their church property in Richmond is, for the Twelfth 
street property, $36,000; Eighth street property, $15,000 ; 
and Whitewater, $8,000. 



CITY OF RICHMOND. 139 

THE SOCIETY OF FRIENDS. 2. 

In the years 1827 and 1828 there was a division in the So- 
ciety of Friends, and that part of the body to which this 
article refers, believing firmly in the doctrines and testimo- 
nies of the society, withdrew, and have held their meetings 
since, in order, as stated in the minutes of the Yearly Meet- 
ing, held the 29th of September, 1828, "As much as possi- 
ble to preserve the unity and harmony of our religious 
society, and to maintain our principles on their ancient foun- 
dation, and according to our present discipline." 

The first meeting held at Richmond after the division was 
in the woods, near where the railroad shops now stand, and 
was attended by about 140 members. Several meetings of 
conference were afterward held in the public-school building, 
for the purpose of procuring a place for worship. 

An upper room in a tavern located on Main street, between 
Eighth and Ninth streets, was accordingly selected for that 
purpose. 

In the fall of the same year Friends held their Yearly 
Meeting at Waynesville, Ohio, where it was decided to hold 
it alternately at Waynesville, Ohio, and Richmond, Ind. 

Soon after the Yearly Meeting in 1828, a public meeting 
was held in a large barn, near Richmond; the room in the 
tavern was thought too small to accommodate the number 
likely to assemble. The meeting was large and satisfactory. 

On the 24th of September, 1828, a committee was appointed 
to select and purchase a lot on which to erect a meeting- 
house; a piece of ground, containing three-fourths of an acre, 
was selected at the junction of Fort Wayne avenue and Sixth 
street, for which, in conjunction with the Quarterly Meeting, 
was paid $100. 

Upon this lot was erected a frame building 40 x 60 feet, un- 
der the superintendence of the following committee: Robert 
Morrisson, Enos Graves and Charles W. Starr. The house 
was completed and meetings were held in it in 1830. A few 
years later another building of like material and dimensions 
was erected on the ground, which was designed for the ac- 
commodation of the Yearly Meeting, and in the interval it 



140 HISTOKY OF WAYNE COtJNTY. 

was used for a Friends' school, and was largely attended by 
them and others. 

In 1864 this property was sold, and a lot, consisting of one 
entire square of ground, situated between Eleventh and 
Twelfth and North A and B streets, was purchased of the 
Charles W. Starr estate, for the sum of $5,000. 

In 1865 a plain, substantial, brick building, capable of 
holding 1,600 persons, was erected at a cost of $12,745.64. 
The Yearly Meeting was held in this house, in the fall of 

1865. 

Three years later a large two-story brick structure, in- 
tended for an academy, was erected on the ground at a cost of 
$10,000, in which, for several years, a well-conducted school 
was sustained under the auspices of the society. 

This building is now used by the " Richmond Normal 
School:' 

Their property, in total, is about $50,000. 

While the membership of this branch of the society is not 
large, it includes members in whose daily lives may be found 
the elements of the true friend, as held by the early founders 
of the society, as well as active and earnest workers, well 
known for their zeal and integrity in promoting the welfare 
of the oppressed, irrespective of race or color, as well as some 
of the most popular and influential citizens of Wayne County. 

ST. Paul's episcopal chubch. 

The first Episcopal services were held in Richmond, in 
February, 1837, by Kt. -Rev. Jackson Kemper, in the upper 
room of the City Hall (old Warner building). No effort was 
then made to organize a church. In April or May, Rev. 
Gresham Waldo commenced holding services in the lower 
room of the same building, but left on account of poor 
health after about two months. About the 4th of July, 1837, 
Rev. Geo. Fiske located in Richmond by the advice of 
. Bishop Kemper. He held services in the old frame church 
on Fort Wayne avenue, where the First M. E. Church now 
stands. He continued his missionary labors until Feb. 12, 
1838, when St. Paul's Protestant Episcopal Church was or- 
ganized. The meeting for the purpose of forming a congre- 



CITY OF RICHMOND. 141 

gation was held at tlie law office of James W. Green. Rev. 
Mr. Fiske was Chairman; Ebenezer T. Turner, Secretary; 
E. T. Turner and Hermon B. Payne were elected Wardens; 
James W. Borden, "Wm. S. Addleman and George Arnold, 
Vestrymen. The lower room of the Warner building was 
leased as a place for worship, in June, 1838. Sept. 10, 1838, 
steps were taken toward building a church edifice, to cost 
from $4,000 to $6,000, and a building committee was ap- 
pointed. A church lot was selected in 1830, and on the 23d. 
of May of that year the church was legally incorporated. H. 
B. Payne and J. W. Green were chosen Wardens, and J. W. 
Borden, Stephen B. Stanton, John D. McClelland and George 
Arnold, Vestryman. The church building was partially 
finished in 1841, and the basement used as a place for ser- 
vices. The parsonage was built in 1843 at a cost of $354.50. 
The church building was completed in 1849, and consecrated 
Dec. 20, by Bishop Upfold. 

Rev. Mr. Fiske tendered his resignation as rector April 21, 
1851, but it was not finally accepted until Nov. 20, 1855. 
His health, long impaired, gave way, and he died in Febru- 
ary, 1860. The present rector, Rev. John B. Wakefield, was 
elected Dec. 3, 1855, and has been an earnest and devoted 
laborer for the Master during the long period of his pastor- 
ate. The church had a hard struggle for life in its early 
years, but was brought safely through its troubles aided by 
such devoted men as Rsv. Mr. Fiske, Stephen B. Stanton, 
Wm. S. Addleman, H. B. Payne and others. 

The number of communicants in 1839 was twelve; in 1855, 
fifty-two; in 1883, 154. Value of church property, about 
$20,000. The church has one of the finest organs in the 
West. 

FIKST PKESBYTEKIAN CHURCH. 

This church was organized in Richmond, Ind., Nov. 15, 
1837, by a committee of the Oxford Presbytery. Thirty 
members united together composing the organization, and 
two others joined the day following. John Dougan, Jno. 
B. Taylor and Wm. McGathery were chosen Elders, and the 
Rev. Charles Sturdevant was chosen as tiieir pastor. They 



142 HISTORY OF WAYNE COUNTY. 

had no place of worship of their own for three years, but had 
the use, occasionally, of the school-house, and the church of 
the Associate Reformed (now U. P.) church. Their first 
church building was erected in 1840, near its close, at a cost 
of lot and ground of $800, being improved in 1847 and con- 
tinued in use until 1854. The present church edifice was 
commenced in 1850, but not fully completed until the first of 
the year 1854, when it was dedicated Feb. 5, of that year. 
The lot was a donation to the church from Chas. W. Starr. 
The church cost something over $5,000, and since then in re- 
pairs and improvements some $3,000. The ministers have 
been Kev, Charles Sturdevant, from organization to 1841; 
Eev. Thomas Whallon, from 1842 to 1845; Rev. R. A. Nay- 
lar, from 1845 to 1846; Rev. Francis P. Monford, from 1847 
to 1851; Rev, Henry L. McGuire began his labors herein 
July, 1852, and continued until Sept. 4, 1853, when he was 
summoned to his rest, greatly lamented by the church; Rev. 
Chauncy Leavenworth, from 1854 to 1856; Rev. John F. 
Smith, from 1857 to 1859; Rev. W. H. Yandaren, from 1860 
to 1863; Rev. J. R. Geyer, six months in 1864; Rev. Lucius 
W. Chapman, from 1865 to 1870; Rev. Isaac M. Hughs, pres- 
ent pastor, commenced labor here July 17, 1870, was installed 
pastor Oct. 20, 1870. 

The church has been free from debt since 1870, and has a 
membership of 275. The Sabbath congregations are large. 
The singing is congregational and led by a pipe organ. 
Weekly prayer-meetings are held every Thursday evening. 
The Sabbath-school meets at nine o'clock every Sabbath 
morning, and teachers meeting every Monday evening. 
There have been organized by the members of this church, 
the Ladies' Aid Society, The Women's Prayer-Meeting and 
the Woman's Foreign Missionary Society. There have been 
few more prosperous churches, or one by their works more 
deserving. 

UNITED PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH. 

This church, at the time of its organization, was called the 
Associate Reformed Presbyterian Church. The records of 
this church prior to October, 1842, having been lost, the 



CITY OF RICHMOND. 143 

few facts of its early history here given are furnished chiefly 
from recollection, by one who was a member at the time of 
its organization. At the time of his settlement here, there 
were but few Presbyterians in this vicinity. The lirst sermon 
from a Presbyterian minister is supposed to have been preach- 
ed by Alexander Porter, in 1S24. Only occasional preach- 
ing, however, was had for many years. The first pastor, 
or settled minister, was William M. Boyce, in 1835 or 1836. 
A frame meeting-house was built on Pearl street, south 
of Main. Among those who became members at and near 
the time of the organization were: Kobert Grimes, Daniel 
Reid, A. Grimes, Jeremiah L. Meek and John Reid, with 
their wives, Widow Grimes, Mary Kibby, James McFadden^ 
Mary Davidson, Isaac Conley. Eobert Grimes and Daniel 
Reid were chosen Elders. The name of Joseph McCord ap- 
pears on record as an Elder at a meeting of the session in 
1843. The pastorate of Mr. Boyce terminated in 1851; after 
which the church had for many years no settled pastor or 
stated preaching. In 1858 it assumed the name of the 
United Presbyterian Church, and Adrian Aten became its 
pastor. In August, 1862, Robert Grimes, one of its Elders, 
died. In October, 1863, William S. Reid and John J. Conley 
were chosen Elders. In 1864, it is believed, the labors of Mr. 
Aten as pastor ceased; and on the 7th of May, 1866, Nixon E. 
Wade was ordained and installed. About the same time the so- 
ciety decided to build anew house of worship; and in ISTovem- 
ber following (1866) William S. Reid was chosen "to take the 
entire superintendence of the new church building." David 
H. Dougan was elected Treasurer, and Daniel Reid, John J. 
Conley and David H. Dougan, Trustees for the ensuing year. 
On Sabbath, Sept. 15, 1867, the congregation entered their 
new house of worship for the first time. The opening sermon 
was preached by William Davidson, D. D., of Hamilton, 
Ohio. July 17, 1869, A. M. Weed was chosen an Elder. In 
February, 1870, Rev. Joseph W. Clokey commenced his 
labors, and was installed April the 28th following. The 
church was not fully finished until 1869, when it was dedi- 
cated by the Rev. William H. McMillan, oi' Xenia, Ohio. 
The Trustees at the time were Daniel Reid, John J. Conley 



144 HISTORY OF WAYNE COUNTY. 

and David H. Doiigan. The Elders at this date, 1884, are: 
William S. Raid, Andrew F. Scott, James W. Smith and T. 
W. O. BrafFett; Deacons, Frank H. Glass, Lucius W. Roberts, 

Alfred Lefevere and McFlierson. The church liabilities 

at its completion were assumed bv W. S. Reid and A. F. 
Scott, and the clmrch is free from debt. It is a handsome 
edilice, built in the Gothic style, and in size 39 x YO feet, with 
a seating capacity of about 400. 

NEW JERUSALEM CHURCH. 

The New Jerusalem Church, of Richmond, was, through 
the instrumentality of Dr. O. P. Baer, organized late in the 
year 1849, the Doctor making his home in Richmond that 
year. There were but few members of the new church so- 
ciety then residing in the city, but the few cordially united 
with Dr. Baer in organizing a society for the good of the 
church. The society was composed of the following mem- 
bers: Dr. Joseph Howells and wife, James Austin and wife, 
son and three daughters, Daniel Roberts and wife, Jacob 
Purington and wife, Mr. Pullen and wife, and Dr. O. P. Baer 
and wife. Meetings were held at each other's houses, by some 
one reading either a sermon, or certain portions of the writ- 
ings of the new church. 

Owing to removals, the society failed to sustain itself, and 
within eighteen months went out of existence. Owing to the 
few members no minister was regularly engaged, and preach- 
ing was had only occasionally. This was continued, even 
after the organization failed, to 1867. During this non-ex- 
istence of the society, services had been held at different 
times, conducted by Revs. J. P. Stewart, Sabin, Hough, Dr. 
Channs, Henry Miller and others. In the spring of the latter 
year, 1867, Dr. Baer engaged the Rev. G. N. Smith, of Ur- 
bana University, to preach once a month at his residence. 
The audience at first was small, but it grew rapidly, each 
meeting presenting new faces and earnest hearers, until the 
house became too small to accommodate all who came. The 
meetings often terminated in a pleasant religious conversa- 
tion, of questions and answers, intellectually enjoyed by all 
as a feast of good things foi' the soul. This season of spiritual 
feasting lasted until the early spring of 1869. 



CITY OF RICHMOND. 145 

The need of a hall became apparent, and not finding a suit- 
able one it was decided to build. The society having 
grown and strengthened, a new organization was effected 
early in March, 1869, with the following named per- 
sons signing the constitution and by-laws: O. P. Baer, 
Emma J. Baer, Francis Pniyn, Achsah Pruyn, Mrs. John 
Chandler, David Strawbridge, Mrs. S. A. Wrigley, Miss Julia 
H. Finley, M. L. Crocker, Lizzie Crocker. Tliese members 
are what might be called charter members, who worked for 
the building of the temple, and its furnishing, to its dedica- 
tion. All things now being in readiness, first of all a pur- 
chase was made of the southeast corner lot on Franklin and 
Walnut streets for $1,500, paying $1,000 down, and $500 in 
six months. A subscription list was then started, and at the 
same time the contract for erecting the edifice was let to Mr. 
Thomas Roberts. Two thousand dollars were subscribed 
and promptly ])aid by the citizens of Richmond, and $500 
from parties elsewhere. The lot, building and furnishing cost 
$7,500. Before the dedication of the temple the entire 
debt was canceled by Dr. Baer. Dedication services occurred 
on Jan. 21, 1870, conducted by Rev. George Field, aided by 
Rev. F. Sewall. On the 26th of February a Sabbath-school 
was instituted, witii Dr. Baer, Superintendent. During this 
season (1870) there were added to the society, pro]ier]y called 
the New Jerusalem Church Society, the names of Mrs. John 
Finley, Mr. Thomas De Yarmon, Dr. Joseph Howells and 
three daughters, Mary E. Baer, Florence Chandler, and Rev. 
George Field and wife. Rev. G. Field was engaged as min- 
ister, and served the society for more than two years. Mr. 
Field then left for Detroit, and the society was without a 
regular minister for more than a year. Mr. De Charms, a 
licentiate, read sermons for three months during the summer 
of 1873, and during the following winter the society was 
richly entertained by one of the finest sermonizers in this or 
any other country. Judge Plants, of Ohio. Rev. G. N. 
Smith was again engaged in 1874, and preached for two 
years, after which Rev. E A. Bea.nan was engaged to preach 
the first Sabbath of every month, now over six years. 



146 HISTORY OF WAYNE COUNTY. 

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH. 

This church cannot be said to have been organized in 1865, 
but some twenty members of that denomination united to 
hold service in the winter of 1865-'66, and they met first in a 
room over Engine House No. 2; then in the late spring, in a 
school-room on the north side, and from tliere to Phillips' 
Hall which they occupied until they were organized and suffi- 
ciently strong, financially, to erect a place of worship of their 
own, which was done a few years later. Tlie church is a good 
substantial brick edifice, neatly and comfortably furnished. 
It is located on JMorth Eleventh street, on the west side, 
north of Main street. 

The original members as nearly as can be obtained were: 
Mr. and Mrs Daniel Thompson, Mrs. Henderson, Mrs. New- 
port, Mr. Agenbroad, Mr. F. Deal, Mrs. Conover, Mr. 
Griggs, Mrs. Jane Smith, Mr. and Mrs. Smith ot the country, 
Dr. Newton, Mr. and Mrs. Black and daughter. The pastors 
were as follows: Mr. Agenbroad, served two years; Mr. Wil- 
kenson, two years; Mr. Benton, one year; Mr. Moorehouse, 
one year; Mr. Smith, one year; Mr. Agenbroad (second term) 
two years; Mr. Roup, one year. The membership now num- 
bers 104. Rev. Allen is the pastor in charge at the present 
time. 

MT. MORIAH BAPTIST CHURCH. 

The Mt. Moriah Baptist Church, colored, was organized in 
1865, with only five members. The church grew but slowly 
and in a few years ceased to exist. Its pastors were the 
Revs. Trevans, Davis and Shoecraft. It was reorganized 
about the year 1872, and since that time has steadily grown, 
although but few members united at the start. In 1880 it 
had twenty-eight members. Since that time it has advanced 
greatly, under the pastorate of the Rev. Benj. Smith. Its 
ministers have been the Revs. Geo. Pass, Benj. Gardner, 
Brumwell, Polly, Benj. Gardner again, and the present pas- 
tor, Benj. Smith. It has now a membership of seventy-eight 
and its future is promising for good. 



CITY OF RICHMOND, 147 

CHRISTIAN CHURCH, SOUTH NINTH STREET. 

This congregation was organized by Rev. Elijah Goodwin, 
Nov. 21, 1859, in Warner Hall, eight members being present 
whose names were as follows: James Boyd and wife, James 
B. Posey and wife, Thomas Little, David Thomas, Beulah 
Graves and Elizabeth Horsman. Three of the above mem 
bers are still living, one (David Thomas) in Richmond. 

This congregation had no regular place of worship, but met 
from place to place as could be best secured until 1878, when 
the present church building on South Ninth street was erected 
at a cost of nearly $4,000. 

The pastors having charge of this church since its organi- 
zation were as follows: Revs. Elijah Goodwin, A. J. Hobbs, 
Dr. G. W. Thompson, A. J. Loughlin, all of whom were in 
the work before the building of the house; and since the new 
church has been occupied the pastors have been, Revs. J. F. 
Sloan, J, L. Parsons, F. J. Morgan. The Rev. Mr. Morgan 
is the present pastor of the church which now numbers about 
100 members. 

EVANGELICAL LUTHERAN CHURCH. 

This church denomination was among the early organiza- 
tions, members of the church settling in Richmond in 1831:. 
These were German immigrants consisting of two families 
and three single persons, men. They continued to increase 
for the next ten years, when, for the first time they were 
served with a minister of their own faith in the person of Rev. 
I. C. Schulz, who settled in Richmond in 1841, and organized 
the members under the name of St. John's Evangelical Lu- 
theran Church. 

Twenty-three persons joined the church at its organization, 
their names being as follows: John Peterson, Christopher 
Schofer, Eberhard Menke, Henry Juergens, DieterichHoehne, 
Christopher Juergens, William Schulz, Harmon Shofer, 
Eberhard Frauman, Adam Schnelle, Clanior Fetta, W. K. 
Rosa, Henry Eggemeier, Bernhard Knollenberg, Henry vor 
dem Feld, Dieterich Sitloh, Harmon Sitloh, John Eggemeier, 
Gerhard Juergens, Henry Klute, Henry Shofer, Gerhard 
Schnelle and John Hill. 



148 HISTORY OF WAYNE COUNTY. 

From this number there were chosen the following officers: 
Christoper Shofer, John Peterson, Eberhard Menke, Henry 
Juergens, Dieterich Hoehne and Christopher Jiiergens. In 
1846 they built a house of worship, 30 x 50 feet, situated 
on South Fourth street, between C and D, then Front, 
street. Rev. I. C. Schulz resigned in 1849 after faithful 
labor in the congregation and parochial school which he 
organized, also, at the beginning. Rev. J. G. Theis was 
his successor, and during his time of service the congregation 
increased so that they were obliged to enlarge their church 
building. 

There was a division in the church while under the pastoral 
charge of the Rev. J. G. Theis, a part of the members leav- 
ing and forming a new church organization of the same de- 
nomination in another part of the city. In 1854 the church 
edilice was considerably enlarged to meet the growing de- 
mand of the church, the basement being used for a school. 
The Rev. J. G. Theis remained in charge until 1856, when 
he was succeeded by the Rev. C. Schadow, who was installed 
as their regular pastor. The pastor had also, up to this time 
been the teacher of the school, but the work became too 
great, and in 1857 they employed a regular teacher in the 
person of August Mueller, thus more equalizing the burden. 
During the ministerial labors of the Rev. C. Schadow, a se- 
rious trouble arose which threatened the existence of the 
church. This, however, was avoided, the reverend gentleman, 
in 1862, i-esigning. His successor, the Rev. G, Loerrenstein, 
succeeded in restoring the church to peace, and. his able 
and truly Christian labor, resulted in an increased mem- 
bership and a harmonious congregation. This prosperity 
caused the enlargement of the church to its present size, 
in the year 1874. Tiie audience-room will seat 600 persons. 
The church edilice and pastor's residence, including lot, is 
valued at ,$15,000. After thirteen years of successful labor, 
the Rev. G. Loerrenstein resigned his charge and was suc- 
ceeded by the Rev. H. Wickemeyer in 1876, who proved a 
worthy successor, and who is still in successful discharge of 
his [lastoral duties. The membership is 155. There are 
three teachers employed now in the school, with an attend- 



CITY OF EICHMOND. 149 

ance of 174 children. The church is in a truly prosperous 
condition, and free from debt. 

ST. Paul's evangelical luthekan. 

This church was established in the year 1853, and their 
first service was in a school-house, located on the corner of 
South Seventh and B streets. A few years later a good, 
substantial, brick edifice was erected, which is still oc- 
cupied, on the south side of Seventh street, and which since, 
in 1869, was improved by the building of a tower, and in 1874 
still further improved and repaired. The original members 
were: David Knollenberg, David Sittlah, Christian Schofer, 
Christian Fetta, Aaron Turner, Henry Brakensick, Jurgens 
Hasenkoester, William Tiiiemen. 

The pastors who have served the church are: Revs. Mr. 
Schramm, Frederick Rensch, John F. Grossow, Mr. Kuch, J. 
D. Severinghans, G. Schultz, D. G. Rehsteiner, H. Wicke- 
meyer, G. W. Enders and John J. Young, who is the present 
pastor. 

The present membership is 476. 

It has also a neat parsonage which cost $3,000. 

There, is a Sabbath-school kept up with an average attend- 
ance of 355. 

A handsome and commodious brick school-building was 
erected in 1863, with accommodations for 125 pupils or stu- 
dents, and is strictly a parish school. The past year, 1883, it 
had an attendance of fifty-five students. The value of their 
entire property is placed at $25,000. 

The following persons compose the church council of St. 
Paul's Evangelical Lutheran Church: 

Elders, Henry Temme, Pres. ; Frederick Jahnke, Sec; 
Eberhardt Bettenbrock, Treas. 

Trustees, William Bartel, Jacob Goetz, John H. Rosa. 

Deacons, Henry Knollenberg, Frederick Heitbrink, John 
H. MeerhofF, Henry Klopp. 

zion's church. 

The Evangelical Association of Zion's Church first met as an 
organization in 1864, their service being held in a small frame 
building near the First Ward school. They occupied thig 



150 HISTORY' OF WAYNE COUNTY. 

place for nearly two years. The church or association then 
divided. The two branches,the Evangelical Association and the 
German Methodist,cominenced with a membership of twenty. 
On the separation, the above association of Zion's Church held 
their meetings at the old engine-house at the end of South 
Sixth street. They did not worship there long, but erected a 
church edifice of their own at a cost of $4,000. A list of 
the origin ah members are not on record, but Mr. J. C. Burk- 
hardt is the only one living. 

Names of pastors — Revs. Edward Evans (the first), G. 
Schmoll, John Hoffman, Joseph A. Maier, J. K. Troyer, 
William King (same year), Henry Frechter and J. Schmielli, 
under whose care and supervision the church-house was en- 
larged at a cost of $1,300. Revs. George Boederer, A. O. 
Roher, F. Launer, and William Wiedenhoeft, who is the pres- 
ent pastor. The present membership is twenty-two. 

CATHOLIC CHURCHES. 

The first Catholic settlers in and about Richmond were J. 
H. Moorraann, Thomas, John and Daniel O'Hara, Joseph 
Brokarap, Feter Schindler, John Ryan, Charles Boushie and 
Peter Essenmacher, all of whom, excepting the first named, 
are now dead. 

The Catholics of Richmond were visited for the first time 
by a Catholic priest as early as 1836; it was the Rev. Jos. 
Fernediiig, residing at New Alsace, Dearborn County. A 
paper left by Father Ferneding mentions Richmond as one 
of his many missions, stating that it had about ten families. 
He celebrated mass at the houses of Charles Boushie and 
Joseph Brokamp, visiting the place about twice a year until 

184:0. 

Until 1845 Rev. Michael O'Rourke, residing at Dover, 
Dearborn County, paid occasional visits; but from June, 1845, 
until August, 1846, the Rev. Vincent Bacquelin, residing at 
St. Vincent's, in Shelby County, visited Richmond every two 
or three months. 

The first resident priest at Richmond was the Rev. John 
Ryan. He came in August, 1846, and remained until June 
or July, 1848. 



CITY OF RICHMOND. 151 

It was at the time of Father Bacquelin's visits that a lot 
was secured on which to build a church. The Hon. Sam. E. 
Perkins, Judge of the Supreme Court of Indiana, residing at 
Richmond, proposed to donate the lot on Marion street, on 
which the parsonage now stands; however, the lot west of it 
was preferred. It was also the property of Judge Perkins, 
and he sold it to the Catholics for $100, of which sum Father 
Bacquelin paid $25. During Father Ryan's time the corner- 
stone for a brick church was laid, to be known as 

ST. Andrew's church. 

At the solemn blessing of the new church in 1847 by 
Bishop dela Hailandiere, who had donated $500 on condition 
that the church be built of brick, were present the Rev. An- 
drew Bennett, of Djver, Dearborn County, and the Rev. James 
F.Wood, then pastor of the Cathedral in Cincinnati, now Arch- 
bishop of Philadelphia, whose parents at that time lived in 
Richmond. After Father Ryan's departure the Rev. Wm. 
Engeln, of Blue Creek, visited Richmond a few times. 

In May, 1849, St. Andrew's received its second resident 
pastor in the person of the Rev. William Doyle. He remained 
until August, 1853. The Rev. John B. Merl came next, and 
remained until June, 1858. Next the congregation was at- 
tended by the Rev. Henry Peters, of Connersville, until 
March, 1859. From March to December, 1859, the Rev. G. 
H. Ostlangenberg visited Richmond from Brookville. 

On Dec. 25, 1859, the Rev. J. B. H. Seepe was appointed 
resident pastor, and remained at Richmond until September, 
1868. In 1860 Father Seepe built the present church, 120 x 
60 feet. In 1865 a new school-house was erected; the rst 
school-house had been in existence since 1847 or 1848. In 
1867 Father Seepe bought twelve acres of ground for ceme- 
tery purposes. 

The Rev. Ferdinand Hundt was the pastor from Novem- 
ber, 1868, until 1877. In 1870 the tower and spire of the 
church were finished, and in 1874 the cemetery ground was 
much improved and the beautiful mortuary chapel erected. 
' The Rev. J. H. Seibertz is the present pastor of St. An- 
drew's. He took charge in August, 1877. In 1878 he built 



152 HISTORY OF WAYNE COUNTY. 

an addition to the school-house. On his arrival a hnge debt 
was restiny^ heavily upon the congre2:ation. It is not yet en- 
tirely removed, but very much lightened, with brighter pros- 
pects in the not distant future. 

The congregation numbers 240 famili.es. One lay teacher 
and four Sisters of St. Francis teach 230 children. 

Father Seibertz was born on Jan. 20, 1841, in Ockenfels, 
Rhine Province, Germany, and emigrated to this country 
June 24, 1862. He was ordained at Vincennes by Bishop de 
St. Palais, as follows: Tonsure and Minor Orders, June 29; 
Subdeacon, Dec. 8; Deacon, Dec. IT; Priest, Dec. 21, 1864. 
His mission prior to St. Andrew's was Dovei', Dearborn 
County, where he built the church. 

ST. mart's chukch. 

In 1860 the Irish or English-speaking Catholics of Kich- 
mond, who had hitherto worshiped in St. Andrew's Church, 
resolved on separating from tlieir German brethren. They 
bought a church property that had been used by English 
Lutherans, of Louis Burke, for $8,000, to be paid in in- 
stallments of $1,000 a J ear. The church soon began to look 
like a Catholic church. 

For a short time St, Mary's Church was visited by Rev. 
John Cuntin, and after him by Rev. John Gueguen. In Oc- 
tober, 1860, a resident pastor was appointed in the person of 
Rev. Aeg. Merz, who from there also attended Centreville, 
Washington and Hagerstown, in Wayne County, and New 
Castle and Middletown, in Henry County. He remained un- 
til September, 1863, when the Rev. J. M. Villars succeeded 
him. The next pastor was the Rev. Francis Moitrier, who 
resigned October, 1872. 

The Rev. D. J. McMuUen took charge of the congregation 
in October, 1872, heavily burdened with debts. But his ad- 
ministrative abilities soon ordered affairs. The congregation 
became united, and the debt has been very considerably 
reduced. In a few years, no doubt, the church could be con- 
secrated. 

Father McMullen was born at Newry, County Armagh, Ire- 
land, onFeb. 23, 1838. Shortly after, his parents moved to a 




'■^SVH.*CKoevDets:s5-'f- 



SiJgi 




.^^:fCS^ 



^/?^ 




~c§^>yHACKbevoetsJi^' 



e-.^^ e G e c^ 



a 



CITY OF RICHMOND. l^^ 

farm near Celbridge, County Kildare, within eight miles of the 
city of Dublin. At the close of 1848 he sailed for America 
Most of his studies were made at St. Mary's Seminary, Perry 
County, Mo., and at the St. Louis University. He was ordained 
by Bishop de St. Palais at St. Meinrad; Subdeacon, June 17- 
Deacon, June 18; Priest, June 21, 1867. Aug. 5, 1867, he 
arrived in Indianapolis to assist in St. John's Church and at- 
tend these stations: Greenfield, Cumberland, Fortville, Plain- 
field, Brownsburg, Franklin and Edinburgh. He continued 
here until October, 1868, when he was assigned to Pushville, 
Rush County. In October, 1872, he was appointed pastor of 
•St. Mary's Church, Richmond. The congregation numbers 
about 150 families, with an attendance of 170 children at 
school. 

Father McMullen also attends Fountain City, north, and 
Centreville, west, of Richmond, in each of which stations a 
few Catholic families reside. 

The cost of entire church property including cemetery 
(which cost $8,000) amounts to nearly $60,000. 




11 



CHAPTER YL 



BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. 



Ezekiel Aihin, deceased, was born in 1812, in County Don- 
egal, Ireland, and when quite a child came to America with 
an uncle. He lived in Wilmington, Del., where lie learned 
his trade, and was there married to Elizabeth Porter, who was • 
born in Ireland in 1827. They were the parents of nine chil- 
dren, seven of whom are still living. He came West with 
his family and first settled in Ohio on the State line, and 
worked in the mills of Richmond., and finally settled in Rich- 
mond, where he died in 1881. He was foreman of the woolen, 
mill for quite a while, and later became proprietor of the 
mill. In the latter part of his life he joined the Presbyterian 
church, to which his widow and most of his family belong.. 
His son, James P. Aikin, was born and reared in Wayne 
County. He learned his trade in the Fleecy Date Woolen 
Mills, and is now Superintendent of the same. 

W. W. Alexander is a native of Camden, Preble Co., Ohio, 
of Irish ancestry. He was reared in his native county and 
enlisted in the late war, on the first call for volunteers, in the 
Twentieth Ohio Infantry. He afterward enlisted in the 
Thil'teenth Missouri Infantry, which was afterward changed 
to the Twenty-second Ohio Infantry, serving in said company 
three years. He came to Richmond in the fall of 1864, and 
immediately became connected with the Volunteer Fire De- 
partment, being Foreman of the hose part of the time. Since 
its organization as pay deparment he has served in minute 
department until his election as Chief, in 1879, since which 
he has held that position by being annuall}' re-elected. The 
compan}'' is well organized and managed, and as Chief of the 
Fire Department Mr. Alexander has shown his eflBciency. 

Jonathan Baldwin was born in Guilford County, N. C, 
Dec, 4, 1815, a son of John and Charlotte (Payne) Baldwin, 

154 



CITY OF RICHMOND. I55 

natives of North Carolina, liis father born Nov. 4, 1781, and 
his mother, Aug. 4, 1778. His parents were married in 
1803, and in 1825 came to Wayne County, Ind., and settled 
in Clay Township. They bought a farm of ninety-three acres 
and entered a quarter section of wild land, which he gave to his 
two sons. The father died in 1856 and the mother in 1857. 
They were members of the Society of Friends. They had a 
family of nine children. Four are now living, of whom our 
subject is the next to the oldest. He has lived in Wayne 
County since ten years of age. He by his own efforts obtained 
a liberal education and taught school several terms. He was 
married in 1836 to Mary A., daughter of Jesse Albertson, and 
a native of Wayne County, born in 1815. Soon after his mar- 
riage his father gave him $100, and he entered eighty acres of 
land in Hamilton County, Ind., where he spent two years. In 
1838 he returned to Wayne County and bought a farm in Clay 
Township. He remained there till 1878, when he moved to a 
farm two miles from Richmond, and in 1881 to Earlham 
place, West Richmond, on the land where he now lives. He 
has always followed farming and stock-raising, and has been 
very successful. He was a member of the Board of County 
Commissioners three terms, or nine years. At the June 
term of Com. Court, 1875, there were thirty-six applicants 
for a license to retail spirituous liquors. Mr. Baldwin, being 
conscientiously opposed to a license law, resigned being a 
member of the board rather than grant license under said 
law. He and his wife reared a family of five children, four of 
whom are still living, all good citizens of this county. He 
has been an active member of the Society of Friends many 
years, and is an enthusiastic worker in the temperance cause. 
N. H. Ballard, M.D., corner North Ninth and A streets, 
Richmond, Ind., is a son of Barclay, grandson of Thomas, 
and great-grandson of Barclay Ballard, of English descent, 
but of Virginian birth, and in religious faith, Quakers. 
His great-grandfather died in his native State. Thomas Bal- 
lard, in 1846, came to Richmond, Ind., from Warren County, 
Ohio. The maternal ancestry were of New England birth, 
the grandparents Hey wood moving from Carlisle, Mass., to 
Clermont County, Ohio, about 1820. N. H. Ballard is a 



166 HISTORY OF WAYNE COUNTY. 

native of Ohio and came to Richmond, Ind., in 1860. In 
1878 he began reading medicine with J. R. "Weist, and 
remained with him till March, 1883, having graduated from 
the Ohio Medical College, Cincinnati, in 1881. He took a 
course at the Rush Medical College, Chicago, and graduated 
in April, 1883. He has a good practice, having gained con- 
siderable reputation as a surgeon. He is a member of the 
Citj, County, District and State Medical societies, and is Sec- 
retary of the Wayne County Medical Society. He is also a 
member of the Alumni Association of the Medical College 
of Ohio (Cincinnati). He belongs to the Masonic fraternity. 

6r. Balling, stone contractor, was born in 1818, in Bavaria, 
Germany, where he learned the stone-mason's trade, and in 
1869 emigrated to the United States, locating in Richmond, 
where he has since resided. In 1876 he began contracting in 
this city, and since that time has done work on many public 
and private buildings, — among which may be mentioned Hoo- 
sier Drill Works, Hittle block, Jackson's corner, Dickaso)i's 
corner, Westcott's, Bell's and Kendall's residences, — and is one 
of the leading stone-masons of Wayne County. In connec- 
tion with his trade he has carried on a grocery and provision 
store since July, 1883, corner of Southeast and Sixth streets. 
He was rnarried in 1872 to Louisa Selmoning, who was born 
in 1849, in Holland. 

B. P. Bethge, manager of the Union Depot restaurant, 
Richmond, Ind., is a native of Columbus, Ohio, but since 
1874 a resident of Richmond. The restaurant of which he has 
charge is the outgrowth of a small beginning, being at first 
but a lunch stand, but in 1868 P. Merkle & Co. became the 
proprietors, and after the erection of the present spacious 
depot secured a room 47 x 19|^ feet in size, and now keep a 
first-class eating- room, Mr. Merkle is an old, experienced 
man in the business, but being a resident of Columbus the 
management is given to Mr. Bethge. Meals are served to all 
trains at reasonable rates. 

Tkaddeus W. 0. Braffett^ Auditor Wayne County, Ind., 
was born in Bradford Countj^ Pa., April 12, 1829, a son of 
Alfred and Eliza (Long) Braffett, his father a native of Penn- 
sylvania, of French descent, and his mother a native of Ver- 



CITY OF KICHMOND. 157 

mont, of English descent. In 1831 his parents removed to 
Ohio, settling near old Fort Black, built as such by General 
William Henry Harrison, near New Madison, Darke Co., 
Ohio; subsequently moved to Braffettsville in the same 
county, and in 1839 removed to New Paris, Preble Co., 
Ohio, where his father died in the year 1865, and where his 
mother still lives, now in the eightieth year of her age. 
Our subject is the second of nve children. He received a 
commercial school education and followed merchandising 
with his father until the year 1855. In 1857, having lost his 
wife, he went to California and spent three years in the min- 
ing interest, returning in 1860. In January, 1861, he went 
to Geneseo, 111., taking charge of a wholesale and retail dry- 
goods and agricultural house. When the first gun was 
fired on Fort Sumter, he at once offered his service to the 
Government as a private soldier and enlisted in Company B, 
Ninth Illinois Cavalry; .was promoted to Sergeant, Lieutenant 
and Captain of his company. The regiment went into camp 
at Camp Douglas, 111.; from there to Benton Barracks, St. 
Louis, Mo., and later was ordered to Pilot Knob, Mo., where 
his regiment was first engaged in battle with the guerrilla 
bands of the Kebel Colonel Pickett; the regiment, with 
others of infantry, was placed under the command o"f General 
Steele, and took up marching orders to join General Frank 
Siegel at Pea Ridge, but with guerrilla bands and bush- 
whackers in front impeding the march, the battle of Pea 
Eidge was fought before General Steele's arrival. They were 
then ordered to Jacksonsport, Ark., where, after its arrival, 
communication was cut ofi" by the rebels, but the timely ar- 
rival of General Curtis's command from Pea Ridge relieved 
them from all being captured as prisoners ot war. Under 
General Curtis the command was ordered to Little Rock, 
Ark., having to fight their way all along the line of march for 
two weeks. With superior numbers of rebels in front, the 
line of march was changed to Helena, on the Mississippi 
River. " From constant exposure, forward marches and at- 
tacks by guerrilla bands in front and rear, the little army ot 
General Curtis was ^badly cut to pieces. On arriving at 
Helena they went into camp on the low grounds and disease 



158 HISTORY OF WAYNE COUNTY. 

easily took hold or the men, and of those left, one-third of 
Captain Braffett's company died. After two months in camp, 
the regiment was ordered to Memphis, Tenti., Captain Braffett 
contracting the malaria disease that carried so many of his 
company to death; laid at Helena for two months almost 
dead, but rallied sufficiently to return to his home, then at 
JSTew Paris, Ohio. After a short furlough he again returned 
to his regiment, but the old disease again took hold of him, 
and prostrated him lower than ever. On account of this dis- 
ability, he reluctantly tended his resignation. He was dis- 
charged in January, 1863, returning to his home, then in 
Richmond. In 1865 Captain Braffett was elected Assistant 
Clerk (by the Republicans) of the Indiana House of Repre- 
sentatives, also Assistant Clerk of the special session of that 
body in the same year, and Journal Clerk of the Indiana State 
Senate in 1869. Subsequently he became the traveling agent 
for the wholesale grocery house of William Glenn & Sons, 
Cincinnati, Ohio, whom he represented for several years and 
afterward connected himself with the New York house of 
Francis H. Leggett efe Co. In 1880 he resigned his traveling 
agency and was appointed Deputy Clerk of the Wayne Cir- 
cuit Court, which position he held for three years, having 
been (in the meantime) elected Auditor of Wayne County, 
which responsible office he is now filling, having entered 
upon his duties Nov. 1, 1883. Captain Braffett is a Mason of 
high rank, having taken all the degrees conferred by that 
order in the United States (save the Thirty-third degree). 
He is also a member of the Independent Order of Odd 
Fellows. He was married in 1819 to Sarah A. E. 
Ireland, of New Paris, Ohio, who died in 1855, leaving 
three children. One son and daughter reside in Cincinnati, 
Ohio, and one daughter in Richmond; all married. In Jan- 
uary, 1862, Cap tain Braffett, while in the army, was married to 
Miss Lizzie J. Mitchell, of Oxford, Ohio. They have three 
children — two sons and one daughter (unmarried). They re- 
side at No. 36 South Thirteenth street, Richmond. Captain 
Braffett and famil\^ are active members of the United Presby- 
terian church. 



CITY OF RICHMOND. 159 

G. R. Boslow was born in Monroe, Mich., in 1833, the 
youngest of a family of eight children of John and Mary 
(Condon) Boslow, his father a native of Pennsylvania, born 
in 1787, and his mother a native of New Brunswick, born in 
1796. His parents were married in 1812. His father died 
in Green County, Wis., April 17, 1818, and his mother in 
Richmond, Ind., in 1880, His father was a patriot of 1812 
and was subsequently connected several years with the Lake 
Erie & Mad River Railroad. His grandfather, Jacob Boslow, 
was a native of Germany and died in Branttbrd, Ontario, 
Canada, at the age of 101 years. The name was originally 
spelled Boughslau£:h and has been changed by the present 
generation. Our subject spent his early life in Brantford, 
Ontario, Green County, Wis., and Hardin County, Ohio. In 
1852 he became connected with the Lake Erie & Mad 
River Railroad, being engaged in relaying the track. He 
afterward was employed as conductor on the road fourteen 
years. He then went on the Terre Haute, Alton & St. 
Louis Railroad, and in 1867 came to Richmond and was em- 
ployed on the Chicago & Great Eastern Road, remaining 
there till April, 1883. Mr. Boslow has been a member of 
the Masonic fraternity and has taken all degrees, including 
the Knights Templar. He was married to Miss Mary E., 
daughter of Jacob Holmes, of Kenton, Ohio. They have a 
family of three children. 

Ezra Boswell, deceased, was born in 1788, in England. He 
learned the trade of a brewer in his native country, and came 
to the United States in the early part of the present century, 
settling in North Carolina, where we was married to Eliza- 
beth Kindley. He carried on brewing in North Carolina till 
1816, when he moved to Richmond, Wayne Co., Ind., 
and erected the third frame house in the city, which is still 
standing on Fort Wayne avenue. He followed his trade in 
Richmond till his death in 1831. His widow survived him 
till 1848. They had eleven children, six of whom survive— 
Anna, widow of Andrew Reid; Daniel K., residing in St. 
Louis; Rebecca C, wife of Andrew S. Wiggins; Mary, wife 
of Edward Kindley, who is practicing law in Savannah, Mo.; 
John K., inventor and patentee of Boswell's Patent Fruit 



160 HISTORY OF WAYNE COUNTY. 

Drier, now of Thayer County, Neb., and Sarah S., wife of 
Alanson Sponsler, of Thayer County, Neb. Mr, Boswell was 
a member of the Friends' Society and in politics was a "Whig. 
His daughter, Rebecca C, is an active worker in the W. C. T. 
U. She is one of the Trustees of the Home of the Friendless. 

Howard Campbell^ assistant superintendent of the firm of 
Gaar, Scott & Co., was born in "Wayne County, Ind., a sou 
of Thomas Campbell. He learned the pattern-maker's trade, 
which he has since superintended. He was married to Maggie 
Beeler, of "Wayne County, who is a daughter of C. C. Beeler. 

Thomas Camphell^ of the firm of Gaar, Scott & Co., is a son 
of William and Elizabeth (Parsons) Campbell, his father hav- 
ing died when our subject was a child, his mother surviving 
him twenty-four years. Thomas learned the carpenter's 
trade in Pennsylvania, completing it in New York, and in 
the spring of 1845 he came to Richmond, Ind., and com- 
menced working as a journeyman in the wood shop of J. M. 
and J. H. Hulton's spring foundry, and for a number of 
years he was foreman of the pattern shop. He is at present 
a stock holder in the same firm. He was married in 1851 to 
Elizabeth, daughter of Jonas Gaar. They have three chil- 
dren — Howard, Assistant Superintendent of Gaar's "Works; 
Sarah E., wife of George R. "Williams, and "William, foreman 
of the pattern shop at Gaar's "Works. Mr. Campbell has re- 
tired from active life, and resides on "Washington avenue, 
Richmond. 

William H. Camphell^ son of Thomas Campbell, is a na- 
tive of Richmond, Ind. He learned the trade of pattern- 
maker, and at present occupies the position of foreman of the 
pattern-room of the firm of Gaar, Scott & Co. His maternal 
grandfather, Jonas Gaar, was one of the oldest and prominent 
pioneers of this county. 

Walter T. Carpenter^ Trustee of Earlham College, and re- 
tired farmer, "West Richmond, Ind., is of Welsh descent. 
His paternal ancestor, seven generations back, Ezra Carpenter, 
was born in Wiltshire, Wales, in 1550. His two sons were — 
Richard, born May 15, 1593, and William, born Aug. 28, 
1601. The latter never married, became very wealthy and 
died in England in 1701. The former emigrated to America 



CITY OF RICHMOND. 161 

when a young man and died June 11, 1669. To him were 
born two sons— Ephraim, in 1623, and John, in 1627. The 
eldest of these sons was the father of Ephraim, who was born 
March 4, 1653, about the time of the conversion of the family, 
under the preaching of George Fox, the founder of the So- 
ciety of Friends. His fourth child, Timothy Carpenter, was 
born Dec. 19, 1665, and was the father of John, ot Oyster- 
berry, who was born June 13, 1690. The latter's eldest son, 
John, the hatter, was born Jan. 7, 1714, and lived and died 
in New York. His second child was Abram, born in West- 
chester County, K Y., Dec. 27, 1738. The tenth of Abram's 
children, Isaac, was born in Westchester County, N. Y., 
Oct. 10, 1779, and in matarer years settled in Clinton County, 
Ohio, where he died Feb. 5, 1836. His wife was Mercy 
Frost, born in Westchester County, N. Y., in 1781, and died 
in Ohio in 1816. Of their six children, Walter T. is the fifth, 
and was born in Albany, N. Y., Jan, 1, 1811. He was 
reared on a farm in Clinton County, Ohio, and afterward was 
engaged in merchandising in Wilmington, Ohio, and subse- 
quently in Cincinnati. From 1847 to 1857 he was farming in 
Warren County, Ohio, and in the latter year moved to Rich- 
mond, where he soon after became Superintendent of Earl- 
ham College, then a boarding school. He filled the position 
fifteen years and at the same time was one of a committee of 
twelve who had charge of the college. In 1880 the manage- 
ment of the college was changed, and control of its affairs 
vested in twenty-four trustees, Mr. Carpenter being one of 
the number. Since his appointment as Superintendent of the 
college, he has lived rather retired on his farm near Rich- 
mond. He married Susan Mabie fifty years ago, who was 
born in New York Dec. 27, 1811. Of their four children, 
but three are living— Charles G., of Richmond; Caroline, wife 
of H. C. Wright, and Elizabeth, wife of Daniel W. Marmon; 
both daughters reside in Indianapolis. 

Elijah Co-ffiro, deceased, was one of Wayne County's most 
prominent and enterprising citizens. He contributed toward 
the building up of its benevolent societies, assisted in laying 
the foundation of the banking interests of the county, and was 
one of the most influential members of the Society of Friends. 



162 HISTORY OF WAYNE COUNTY. 

He was the son of liethuel and Hannah (Dicks) Coffin, and 
was born in New Garden, Guilford Co., K C, Nov. 17, 1T98. 
He received a fair education for the early part of the nine- 
teenth centur}^, and taught school some time in his native 
State. Feb. 2, 1820, he was married to Naomi Hiatt, and 
settled on a farm in his native county. In 1821 he came to 
Indiana and located in Milton, Wayne County, and resumed 
the occupation of teachino^. In 1829 he opened a store in 
Milton, and his fidelity and ability became known to a whole- 
sale firm of Cincinnati, who made him a liberal oflfer as clerk, 
and in 1833 he abandoned his store and removed to Cincin- 
nati, remaining there a year and a half. At that time a 
branch of the Indiana State Bank was located at Richmond, 
and Mr. Coffin was cliosen its Cashier, a position he was ad- 
mirably fitted for. He therefore, in November, 1831, re- 
moved to Richmond. He was the bank's Cashier, holding 
the jjosition twenty-four years, the limit of the charter. At a 
final meeting of the Board of Directors, Dec. 21, 1858, the fol- 
lowing resolution was offered by Robert Morrisson and adopted: 
" It is unanimously resolved^ Tliatin consideration of the able 
and faithful services of Elijah Coffin , as Cashier of this branch, 
from its first organization till its close, and the fidelity and 
promptitude with which he has discharged the various and 
important duties confided to his care, the board embraces the 
opportunity to express upon our minutes the high sense en- 
tertained of his official services and private worth." With 
the closing of the bank Mr. Coffin gave up secular business. 
His religious affiliations were unabating and unswerving in 
the Society of Friends. He was at an early age Clerk of the 
Yearly Meeting in North Carolina, and in 1827 was ap- 
pointed Clerk of the Indiana Yearly Meeting. Nothing was 
too arduous for him if it tended to the upbuilding of the 
society and of mankind. He was a friend of education, 
Sabbath-schools, and all associations to promote the circula- 
tion of tracts and tlie reading of the Scriptures. He was for 
many years a life member of the American Bible Society. 
His death occurred Jan. 22, 1862, and his wife followed him 
June 14, 1866. Their children were — Miriam A., Charles F., 
William H., Eliphalet, Caroline E., Mary C. and Hannah, 



CITY OF RICHMOND. 103 

three born in North Carolina and four in Wayne Countv. 
Charles F. has, during the greater portion of hi? life, been in 
the banking business in Richmond. He was one of the orig- 
inal proprietors of the Citizens' Bank, established in 1853; 
was Cashier of the Richmond branch of the Bank of the State. 
and been President of the Richmond National Bank since 
its organization. Afcer the death of his father lie was 
chosen to fill many of the important positions of the church, 
and the part taken by his father has been continued by him 
with equal interest and ability. He married Rhoda Johnson, 
who is also an able and active worker in the Society of 
Friends. Their children are — Elijah, Charles H., Francis A., 
William E. and Percival. 

C'. ^. 6''6)^/^ is a native of the city of Richmond, and the 
second son of Charles F. Coffin. The greater part of his 
education was received in his native city, where from early 
maniiood he has been connected with what is now the Rich- 
mond National Bank, of which he has been Yice-President 
and Cashier since 1873. He has been identified with many 
of the business interests of Richmond, and since 1881 has been 
a stockholder and Yice-President of the manufacturing estab- 
lishment of Haynes, Spencer & Co., Richmond. Mr. Coffin 
is a birthright member of the Society of Friends and has been 
Trustee of the Indiana Yearly Meeting since 1882. His wife 
is a daughter of Dr. Jos. Howells, of Richmond. 

Joseph H. Cooke, City Treasurer, Richmond, Ind., was 
born in Circleville, Ohio, in 1851, a son of Joseph Cooke, 
who died in Columbus, Ohio, the same year of our subject's 
birth. He was educated in Lexington, Ohio, and learned the 
tanner's trade. In 1875 he entered the employ of the Pitts- 
burg, Cincinnati & St. Louis Railroad at Indianapolis, as 
bill clerk, and a month later was transferred to Richmond. 
In 1876 he was appointed Cashier and remained in the em- 
ploy of the road till 1880. In February of the latter year he 
was appointed by the City Council to fill an unexpired term 
as City Treasurer, and in May, 1881, was elected to the posi- 
tion, and re-elected in 1883. Mr. Cooke is a member of 
Webb Lodge, No. 24, F. & A. M. ; Sir Knight Commander 
of Richmond Division, No. 14, U. R. K. of P., and is Chan- 



164 HISTORY OF WAYNE COUNTY. 

cellor Commander of lola Lodge, No. 53, K. of P. Politi- 
cally he is a Republican. Feb. 23, 1876, Mr. Cooke married 
Jessie, daughter of General "Wm. P. Benton. They have two 
children — Marjorie and Edson B. 

Joseph B. Craighead, son of Dr. John Boyd and Rebecca 
(Dodds) Craighead, was born in Dayton, Ohio, Jan. 29, 1845, 
where he resided until eighteen years of age. In the spring of 
1863 he came to Richmond and for two years was employed 
in the freight oflSce of the Columbus & Indiana Central 
Railway Company, under H. S. Kates, agent. He then 
went South and was in the cotton commission and wholesale 
grocery and liquor business. In 1866 he returned Korth and 
went into business in Dayton, Ohio, manufacturing threshing 
machines. In 1872 he went to St. Louis, Mo., and engaged 
in selling agricultural implements, but in 1874 returned to 
Richmond and took the position of bookkeeper for Gaar, 
Scott & Co., and afterward purchased stock in the company. 
Dec. 30, 1869, he was married to Hannah Ann Gaar, who 
was born in Richmond, Ind,, May 26, 1849. 

Daniel B.Crawford y^'d& born in Hartford County, Md., 
Nov. 16, 1807, and when seven years of age removed with 
his mother's family to Baltimore, and thence, in 1835, to 
Wayne County, Ind., settling two and a half miles north of 
Richmond. Although the land was in the unbroken forest 
it had a frame house on it, a thing rarely seen in those days. 
He continued agricultural life till 1850, when he moved to 
Richmond and became established in the mercantile business, 
and has now one of the oldest dry-goods and carpet houses in 
the city, doing business under the firm nane of D. B. Craw- 
ford & Son. Mr. Crawford has held at various times differ- 
ent offices of honor and trust in the city and county. He 
was County Commissioner from 1850 till 1870, with the ex- 
ception of six years. He has been a zealous member of the 
Methodist Episcopal church many years and has always been 
a liberal supporter of its interests. He was one of the build- 
ing committee of the new Methodist church on East Main 
street. He was married in Baltimore, Md., June 10, 1828, 
to Agnes Corrie. They have had nine children — Daniel J., 
Elijah J., Mary F. (wife of J. C. Ratcliff ), John Y., Sarah 



CITY OF RICHMOND. * 165 

R., Charles W., Agnes S., Elizabeth A. "W. and Robert. 
They have had a laborious but pleasant life, and now, after 
fiftj-six years of wedded lite, are living in the enjoyment of 
tke consciousness of a life devoted to their family and the 
interests of the community. 

Henry Crivel, foreman of the foundry of Gaar, Scott & 
Co., was born in Hanover, Germany, Oct. 12, 1828, a son of 
Henry and Mary Crivel. His father was by trade a black- 
smith, and in early life he learned the same trade. He was 
educated in his native country, and when seventeen years of 
age came to the United States and located in Richmond, 
Ind., where he worked at his trade, with the exception of 
two months, till 1847. He then went into the shop of Gaar, 
Scott & Co. to learn the molder's trade and has since been 
in their employ, and since 1858 has been foreman of that 
department. He thoroughly understands his trade in all its 
details, and is an efficient and trustworthy workman. Mr. 
Crivel has represented the Fourth Ward of Richmond in the 
City Council. He is a member of Webb Lodge, No. 46, F. 
& A. M. ; Herman Lodge, N"o. 199, and Hermania Encamp- 
ment, No. — , L O. O. F. He was first married to Louisa 
Shofer, who died leaving four children. He subsequently 
married Ellen Besselman. They have six children. Mr. 
and Mrs. Crivel are members of St. Paul's Evangelical 
Lutheran Church. 

Alvin E. Crooher.YQ^l eB,iaXQ, loan and insurance agent, 
Yaughn's Block, Richmond, Ind., was born Nov. 6, 1832, in 
Richmond, on the square where the court-house now stands, a 
son of Rev. Peter Crocker, a native of Capo Cod, of English and 
Welsh descent. The latter was educated for a Congregational 
minister and preached for that denomination several years. 
In later life he became more liberal in his views and adhered 
to the doctrine of Swedenborg. He married Jane Eiver, and 
she died in New Bedford, Mass., leaving five children. He 
subsequently married Alice Eiver, a sister of his first wife, 
who died in 1850, leaving seven children. He died in 1855. 
Our subject is his tenth child. When sixteen years of age he 
began learning the carriage-maker's trade, working at it four- 
teen years. He was obliged to abandon his trade on account 



166 HISTORY OF WAYNE COUNTY. 

of ill health and was employed as salesman for Zimmer & 
Emswiler. In 1861 Mr. Zimmer retired from the firm and 
Mr. Crocker bought a half interest in the business. They 
were very successful, but in 1868 Mr. Crocker withdrew, and 
established another store, where he did a successful business 
till 1876. He then engaged in his present business. He is 
recognized as an upright, energetic man in the business cir- 
cles of the city, and has been Secretary of the Richmond 
Business Men's Exchange since its organization. He was 
married in 1853 to Rlioda, daughter of J ob W. Swain, an early 
manufacturer of the city. They had one son — Oliver P. Mrs. 
Crocker died July 4, 1863, and Mr. Crocker subsequently 
married Elizabeth B. Beckwith, of Dayton, Ohio. 

Henrij Cutter^ grocer, Richmond, Ind., was born in Han- 
over, Germany, in 1840, a son of Henry and Elizabeth 
(Menke) Cutter. His father died in 1854, and in 1857 his 
mother, with her four children, came to the United States and 
located in Richmond, Ind. She died Dec. 13, 1878. Her 
children were Louise, Henry, Anna and Catherine, the latter 
the wife of Adam Boess, of Richmond. On coming to Indiana 
our subject first worked as a farm hand, and subsequently in 
Wiggins's tanyard ten years, thus learning that trade. Sept. 
17, 1867, he opened the store where he is at present engaged, 
and where by his close attention to business and integrity he 
has been very successful. He is a liberal, public-spirited man, 
and is one of the substantial citizens of Richmond. March 5, 
1863, he married Minnie Drifmeyer, a native ot Hanover, 
Germany, but since her seventh year, in 1848, a resident of 
Richmond. They have three sons — John A. L., E. W. F. 
and G. H. Mr. and Mrs. Cutter are members of St. John's 
Evangelical Lutheran Church. He has filled nearly all the 
offices of the church, and is Treasurer and Trustee of Wernle 
Orphan Home, an institution he has been connected with 
since its inception. 

John F. Davenport is a native of Salem County, IST. J. , 
born Dec. 11, 1840. He received a common-school educa- 
tion in his native State, and worked at farming until seven- 
teen years of age, then worked at millwrighting with his 
father until 1860, when he came to Richmond, Ind., and was 



CITY OF KICHMOND. 167 

employed by J. C. Ratcliff for some months, when meeting 
with an accident that disabled him from manual labor for 
some time he engaged with Dr. O. Leary as advertising 
agent; was with him and Dr. Worroll till September, 1862, 
when he enlisted in Company C, Eighty-fom-th Indiana In- 
fantry, and served till June 14, 1865. He was promoted to 
Corporal, October, 1862; to Color Sergeant, Dec. 8, 1862; Or- 
derly Sergeant, Nov. 6, 1864; Second Lieutenant, June 1, 
1865. He was in the battles of Chickamauga, Buzzard's 
Roost, Rocky Face, Dalton, Resaca, Kingston, Pumpkin Yine 
Creek, Pine Mountain, Kennesaw, Neal Dow Church, Culps 
Farm, Peach Tree Creek, siege of Atlanta, battles of Franklin 
and ]N^asliville. At the latter place he received a gun-shot 
wound in right shoulder. After the war he returned to Rich- 
mond and was employed in the wood department of the 
Robinson Machine Works for about ten years; was then 
elected City Wood Measurer, and served two years. Since 
then he has been in the brokerage business. Mr. Davenport 
is a member of Woodward Lodge, No. 212, and Oriental 
Encampment, No. 28, I. O. O. F. ; Osceola Tribe, No. 15, 
O. R. M.; lola Lodge, No. 53, K. of P.; Richmond Temple, 
No. 4, P. C; and Sol Meredith Post, No. 55, G. A. R. He 
was married Oct. 21, 1867, to Sarah E., daughter of Samuel 
and Elizabeth Mills, and grand-daughter of Andrew Hoover. 
They have .two children. 

Henry T. Davis, M. D., Richmond, Ind., was born on the 
Island of Nantucket, Mass., Sept. 29, 1836, the oldest son of 
Henry W. and Lydia Cartwright Davis. Born in rugged New 
England and reared on her stormy coast, he inherited a robust 
constitution and imbibed the energizing influence of his early 
surroundings. The subject of this sketch was educated under 
the public-school system of his native island. An apt scholar, 
he found no difficulty in maintaining his rank in his class; his 
special taste, however, was for mathematical studies, in which 
he excelled. Having completed his school life at the early 
age of seventeen, he commenced the study of medicine with 
William P. Cross, M. D., of Nantucket. For three years this 
was continued, during which time he attended two courses of 
lectures at the Cleveland Medical College, subsequently grad- 



168 HISTORY OF WAYNE COUNTY. 

uating at the Homeopathic Medical College of Missouri, St. 
Louis. During the year 1857 a few months were spent in the 
South, where, finding no satisfactory location, he again turned 
toward the Kew England States, but on his way was arrested 
by the thought that to return was no evidence of success. 
Suddenly he determined to try the West, and without any 
particular point in view he drifted to Richmond, Ind., his 
present residence, where the evidences of thrift and prosper- 
ity arrested his course and determined his future. The fol- 
lowing year he was married to Louisa G. McDonald, of 
Oxford, Ohio, and to her rare endowments he attributes much 
of his subsequent success in life. Having no aspirations 
except to succeed in his profession, twenty years of fixed 
residence, with hardly a month's respite, have resulted in a 
competency that is satisfactory and a professional reputation 
that is unquestioned. Buoyant of dis})osition and of untiring 
energy, he has overridden many obstacles in life and resolved 
what would otherwise have been failures into success. En- 
thused with local pride he has served since 1869, except a 
brief interval, as a member of the City Council, and for a 
similar period as President of the Board of Health, sacrific- 
ing much time to promote the city's interests. He is a mem- 
ber of the Knights Templar and the Masonic Order. He is 
also a member of the Grace Methodist Episcopal Church. Of 
unblemished personal character, he still lives one among 
the many examples of what energy and application will 
accomplish. 

Rev. John Dingeldey is a native of Hesse Darmstadt, born 
March 15, 1848, a son of Jacob and Louisa Dingeldey. His 
parents were enabled to give their son a good education, and 
he improved his advantages for the purpose of teaching in the 
parochial schools. In the fall of 1860 he came to the United 
States, and located in Buffalo, N. Y.; from there he removed 
to Youngstown, Ohio. In 1868 he entered the Capital Uni- 
versity at Columbus, Ohio, where he graduated in the theo- 
logical department in 1871. He then located in Sidney, 
Ohio, and in 1879 came to Richmond and took charge of the 
Wernle Orphans' Home, of which he is house-father. He 
was married in 1867 to Anna Stutz, of Buffalo, N. Y. They 



CITY OF RICHMOND. 16& 

have a family of six children — George H., Edward L., Louis 
W., Mary L., John and Henry C. 

Thomas Heath Dodge was born in Sedgwick, Mass., June 
17, 1810, a son of JS". Amaziah and Mercy Dodge, also ot 
Massachusetts. In 1812 his parents removed to Maine, and 
in 1817 to Butler County, Ohio. At the time of the war of 
1812, they lived near Castine, which was destroyed by the 
British. He was reared in Ohio, and attended school but 
three months, the rest of his education being obtained by 
observation and private reading. He has through life worked 
at the mason's trade. He owns a fine farm of forty acres, 
valued at $100 per acre. He was married in August, 1833, to 
Kitty Minor. They had a family of four children — Mary Ann, 
afterward Mrs. Coddington, of Richmond, In d., now deceased; 
Claressa, now Mrs. Frank Black, of Richmond; Thomas and 
Frances. The two latter died in childhood. Mrs. Dodge died 
in May, 1844. In August, 1849, Mr. Dodge married Nancy 
Anil Robey, who was born Aug. 13, 1803. Mrs. Dodge is a 
member of the Christian church. Mr. Dodge is a member of 
no church, but is liberal in his belief. During the war he 
was a staunch Union man, and now affiliates with the Republi- 
can party. Of his father's family of eleven children, six sons 
and five daughters, but three are now living — Mary, now the 
widow of L. Mander Lewis, late of Valparaiso, Ind. She now 
resides with her son, B. F.Lewis, of Chicago; Thomas H. 
and John, of Butler County, Ohio. 

William B. Dormer^ Deputy Sheriff, Wayne County, Ind., 
was born in Richmond, Ind., June 4, 1859, a son of Robert 
O. and Julia B. Dormer. His mother died Nov. 1, 1879, 
leaving two children. His education was received in the 
schools of Richmond. He was maj-ried Nov. 30, 1882, to 
Florence B. Hatfield. Nov. 18, 1882, he was appointed 
Deputy Sheriff of Wayne County, a position he still fills. He 
is a member of Lodge No. 53, K. of P., and also Richmond 
Lodge, No. 254, I. O. O. F. 

John B. Dougan^ Cashier Second National Bank, Rich- 
mond, Ind., was born in Niles, Mich., in 1847, a son of 
William and Ann (Gray) Dougan. His grandfather, Isaac 
Gray, was a native of Ireland, and came with his wife, Martha 
13 



170 . HISTORY OF WAYNE COUNTY. 

Bartley Gray, to the United States when a young man, set- 
tling in Virginia, and in the third decade of the present cen- 
tury became a merchant of some note in Richmond. He after- 
ward removed to Niles, Mich., where he died of fever in 1831. 
Our subject became a resident of Richmond in 185Y, and 
here acquired a fair education, completing it at Niles, Mich. 
He has been Cashier of the Second Kational Bank since its 
organization, and is now one of its Directors. He is an en- 
terprising business man, and is one of the promising young 
men of Richmond. 

R. R. Downing was born in Pennsylvania in 1831, the 
youngest of seven children of Daniel L. and Sarah (Iden) 
Downing, his father a native of Queen's County, L. I., of 
Scotch descent, and his mother of Pennsylvania. His parents 
came to Richmond in July, 1837, where his mother died in 
February, 1849, and his father in May, 1860. Their children 
were — Margaret, Ellen, Jane, Anna, Sarah, Susannah and H. 
R., the latter being the only one now living. His father was, 
politically, a Whig till 1856, and then affiliated with the 
Republican party. He was a school-mate of Martin Van 
Buren, but was always opposed to him. He was a member 
of the Society of Friends. Our subject was reared and edu- 
cated in Richmond. He has been in the undertaking business 
since 1876, and is now doing a business second to none in 
the city. He is a member of Whitewater Lodge No. 24 
I. O. O. F., and has been one of its Trustees eight years. He 
has been Treasurer of Oriental Encampment nine years, and 
a member of the Grand Lodge of Indiana since 1873. 

Caleb S.Du Hadway was born Dec. 11, 1826, a son of 
Peter and Martha (Reeves) Du Hadway, his father of French 
descent. The greater part of his education was obtained at 
Richmond, but when fourteen years of age he left school and 
began clerking for his uncle, James E. Reeves. Three years 
later he went to Hagerstown, Ind. , and assumed a similar 
position for his uncle, Mark E. Reeves. In 1848 he and 
Edward Vaughan bought out his uncle and conducted the busi- 
ness till 1850, when Mr. Vauglian went to California. Mr. Du 
Hadway then carried on tlie business alone till 1855. From 
1855 till 1860 he was in the insurance business. In the latter 



CITY OF RICHMOND. 171 

year lie came to Richmond and was in partnership with C. 
W. Ferguson, in the auction business, two years. In 1863 he 
commenced traveling for Yauxem & Leeds, and subsequently 
was employed as bookkeeper and general accountant. In 
1876 he was appointed Deputy Treasurer of "Wayne County. 
In 1878 he was elected Auditor, and served till 1883. Mr. 
Da Had way is a member of the Masonic fraternity. June 
2, 1852, he married Priscilla, daughter of Dr. Buchanan, 
of Hagerstown, Ind. They have one son living. 

Washington I. Dulin was born in Wayne County, Ind., 
in 1842, a son of William and Beulah (Brown) Dulin, his 
father a native of Maryland, and his mother a native of New 
Jersey. His father came West in 1828 and located in Rich- 
mond where he engaged in mercantile business, afterward 
spending eighteen years on a farm near the city, then return- 
ing again to thie city, where he died in 1874. Although he 
was superintendent of a farm, and of a large number of 
slaves while a resident of Maryland, he was always there- 
after an active Whig and Republican. Our subject is the 
fourth of five children. He lived with his parents on the 
farm until he was sixteen, received an academical education in 
Richmond, since which time he has engaged in mercantile 
pursuits, eleven years being devoted to the lumber trade. He 
has served two terms as a member of the City Council, and is 
now one of the Directors of the Richmond Business Men's 
Exchange, and has always taken an active interest in the 
growth and prosperity oi his native city. Mr. Dulin was 
married in 1862 to Rebecca, youngest daughter of Thomas 
Newman. 

George P. Early ^ stenographer for Gaar, Scott & Co., is a 
native of Preble County, Ohio, a son of John and Eliza 
(Dearth) Early. His mother died when he was three years 
of age leaving two children, and since he was ten years of 
age he has taken care of himself. His education has been 
received by private instruction and in the Eaton schools. He 
taught school four years, and during that time took an active 
part in the teachers' associations. In 1877 he began the 
study of stenography, and in 1881 came to Richmond and 
was employed by the Hoosier Drill Company, and subsequently 



172 HISTORY OF WAYNE COUNTY. 

by Gaar, Scott & Co., as stenograher and caligrapliist. In 
February, 1882, he was married to Yiola Swisher, of Preble 
County, Ohio, who was a student of Earlham College. She 
died Jan. 29, 1883, leaving one child — Henry, 

Geo. P. Etnswiler.) son of Dr. J. P. and Elizabeth (Mitchel) 
Emswiler, was born in the town of York, York Co., Pa., Jan. 
15, 1830. His grandfather, Philip Emswiler, was a native of 
Germany and came to America in his youth, locating, it is 
believed, in Shenandoah County, Va. His father was a na- 
tive of Yirginia, and his mother of Baltimore, Md. In 1845 
his parents removed to Johnson County, Ind., and one year 
later to Germantown, Wayne County. In 1850 they removed 
to Knightstown, Henry County, where both his parents 
died. Our subject was the eldest of ten children, and ina 
great degree lacked the opportunities of even a common-school 
education; but being ambitious and studious, he applied him- 
self to private study, and acquired all the essential elements 
of a practical education. When twelve years of age he began 
clerking in a dry-goods house in Harrisburg, Pa., remain- 
ing there until his parents came to Indiana. In December, 
1847, he came to Richmond, obtaining employment of 
Strattan & Wright, afterward Ben]amin Strattan, remaining 
with them for five years. In 1855 he accepted a position in 
the Citizens Bank, tendered him by Morrisson, Blanchard & 
Co., proprietors, remaining there until March, 1857, when 
he formed a partnership with Christian Zimmer, the firm 
name being Zimmer & Emswiler. Three years later Mr. 
Zimmer retired from the firm, and Mr. Emswiler became 
associated with Alvin E. Crocker. After six years of success- 
ful business, Mr. Crocker retired from the firm and Mr. 
Emswiler continued alone about two years. Disposing of 
his stock he retired from the active duties of the merchant 
to a less perplexing and more quiet life. He is not 
a member of any religious denomination, but does not, 
therefore, have less faith in every good work, moral and 
intellectual, which tends to the elevation of his race. He 
has been twice married. His first wife was Martha A., 
daughter of Andrew and Mary Finley, and a niece of John 
Finley, Esq., for many years Mayor of the city of Richmond. 



CITY OF RICHMOND. 173 

They had three children — Charles F., Albert F. and Mary 
Alice, the latter of whom alone survives. Mrs. Emswiler 
died April 6, 1877. Mr. Emswiler afterward married 
Attilia E., daughter of George W. Goodrich, of Peru, Ind. 
She departed this life Feb. 20, 1881, aged thirty-nine years. 
J. J. Finney^ a son of Paulinus and Hannah (Taylor) 
Finney, was born near Niagara Falls, N. Y., Oct. 3, 1829. 
His father was a native of Essex County, N. Y., born in 1797- 
His mother was a native of Burlington, Yt., and a lineal 
descendant of General Zachary Taylor. His parents were 
married in 1821, and in 1839 settled in Butler County, 
Ohio, where his father died Aug. 1 and his mother Aug. 
17, 1849, of cholera. His father taught a school of 
thirty-five pupils near Middletown, live of whom were 
his own children. At the death of his parents the family 
were left in limited circumstances, and the four youngest 
children were provided with homes, while the older ones 
went to learn trades. Our subject carried brick for masons 
until the November following his parents' death and then be- 
gan learning the blacksmith's trade with Kline & Lockwood, 
serving an apprenticeship of three years. He received |3 a 
month and his board and washing the first year, $4 a month 
the second year, and $5 the third year. During the entire 
time he lost but nine days, three of which were occasioned by 
the death of a sister. In the fall of 1852 he opened a shop 
in West Milton, Ohio, which he carried on till 1859, when he 
worked as a journeyman in Eaton, Indianapolis, and Rich- 
mond, in the latter place for S. R. Lipencott. Oct. 12, 1861, 
he enlisted in Company B, Fifty-seventh Indiana Infantry, 
and was elected First Lieutenant. May 30, 1862, he was 
commissioned Captain and assigned to the command of Com- 
pany D, He served with his regiment during the term of 
their enlistment, participating in the battles of Nashville, 
Pittsburg Landing or Shiloh, Corinth, the long and weary 
marches across Alabama, and back into Southern and Middle 
Tennessee, and thence to Kentucky in pursuit of Bragg. 
They took part in the closing scenes of the battle of Perry- 
ville, in the battles of Stone River and Chattanooga, and 
also all the battles incident to the Atlanta campaign, Feb. 



17-i HISTORY OF WAYNE COUNTY. 

4, 1865, he was mustered out on account of expiration of his 
term of service and was recommended by Governor Morton 
as Major and assigned to the One Hundred and Forty-seventh 
Indiana Infantry and served till September, 1865. Three 
of his brothers served through the entire war as Captains and 
all returned home uninjured. After his return home he 
formed a partnership with D. B. Strattan and carried on a 
blacksmith shop till September, 1878, when a partnership 
was formed with J. J. Chase, under the firm name of Chase 
& Finney, and carried on a rag house four years. In 1869 he 
was appointed Assistant Assessor in the Revenue Depart- 
ment, and served till the office was abolished. In February, 
1880, he was elected by the Upper and Lower House of In- 
diana to the office of Director of the State prison, South, at 
Jefferson, and Oct. 1, 1883, was elected Chief of Police of 
Richmond. In 1853 Mr. Finney joined the Odd Fellows 
fraternity at Eaton, Ohio, and in 1865 transferred his mem- 
bership to Lodge Ko. 254, Richmond. He has represented' 
the lodge and encampment in the Grand Lodge and Encamp- 
ment of the State, and has held all the important offices of 
both lodge and encampment. He is also a member of the 
A. P. A., the Red Men, Knights of Pythias, and is now 
Quartermaster of Sol. Meredith's Post, No. 69, G. A. R. 
Politically he is a Republican. His father was so much an 
Abolitionist that he would not support General Taylor, and 
used to say to his sons, "I may not live to see it, but you, 
my boys, will see, ere twenty years go over your heads, that 
there will be no Whig and Democratic parties, but in their 
stead a Union and Anti-Union party, and a great war be- 
tween the Korth and South where rivers of blood will flow, 
and v^hen that time comes I want you to be on the side of 
freedom, right and justice." Mr. Finney has been true to 
his father's injunction and takes an active part in all politi- 
cal matters. He was reared in the Methodist church, and 
though not a member of any church has a preference for that 
denomination. He was married Dec. 26, 1855, to Sallie 
A. Long, of Eaton, Ohio. They have three daughters — Cora 
L., now Mrs. J. E. Jones; Lizzie M., now Mrs. Will H. 
Campbell, and Ida. The two eldest are graduates of the 



CITY OF RICHMOND. 175 

Richmond High School and were teachers in the city schools 
several years. 

J. G. Ford is a native of Oxford, Chester Co., Pa., born 
March 6, 1845. In April, 1861, he entered the Signal Service 
of the United States Army and served till October, 1865. He 
endured many hardships and privations; was with the fleet 
that sailed from Fortress Monroe to Port Royal, S. C, 
March 28, 1867. He was employed as switchman on the 
C. & G. E. Railroad, at Chicago, 111., and has been eighteen 
years in the employ of the road, now known as the Pan Han- 
dle Railway, he having the position of brakeman, baggage- 
master, bill clerk, baggage agent, and in December, 1882, was 
appointed baggage agent at Richmond, Ind. In September, 
1883, he was appointed station master. He has resided in 
Richmond since 1872. He was married to Miss Ella N. Nye, 
of Richmond. They have had four children. Mr. Ford is 
a member of Lodge No. 196, F. & A. M., and Banner Lodge, 
No. 359, 1. O. O. F., New London, Pa. 

Shnon Fox, merchant tailor. No. 714 Main street, Rich- 
mond, Ind. There is, perhaps, no firm in Richmond, in the 
same line of business, so well known as that of Simon Fox. 
Commencing the business as junior member of the firm of 
Kern & Fox, merchant tailors, in the building now occupied 
by Irvin Reed & Sons, in 1865, this house is deserving of 
more than ordinarj'^ mention. Continuing as a member of 
that firm for five years Mr. Fox purchased the interest of his 
partner and removed to the northeast corner of Sixth and 
Main streets, where he remained for over ten years, estab- 
lishing an extensive trade throughout this and adjoining 
counties. On the 2d of March, 1881, he removed his stock 
of goods to No. 714 Main street, in Yaughan's new block, 
the largest and handsomest business structure in the city. 
The store-room is 18x95 feet in size, fitted with walnut coun- 
ters, a handsome all plate-glass front, with a stock of piece 
goods equal in variety, quality and selection to any similar 
concern in the State. Mr. Fox, in busy seasons, employs 
about twenty hands. Mr. Fox is a native of France; came to 
America in 1855, and has been a resident of this city eighteen 
years. He has attained the rank of leader in his line of busi- 
ness, and is, deservingly, so credited. 



176 HISTORY OF WAYNE COUNTY. 

Robert Furnace, M. D., was born in Warren County, 
Ohio, in 1830; a son of Seth and Dinah (Kindley) Furnace, 
his father of Englisli and his mother of German descent, he 
being able to trace his ancestry to 1630 on the father's side 
and to 1680 on the mother's. For many generations the an- 
cestors have been Friends, liis grandmother and mother both 
being ministers in that society. He, for many years, has 
been an acknowledged minister and since coming to Kich- 
mond has been prominently identified with and has labored 
efficiently for the society. The family has figured promi- 
nently in political circles, a great uncle, Wilkinson Furnace, 
having represented Ohio in the United States Senate. The 
Furnace family settled in Ohio from South Carolina in 1803, 
in Miami and Warren counties, our subject's grand-parents 
locating in the latter county. His mother was a native of 
that county and his father of South Carolina. To them were 
born four children — Davis, Robert, Mary, and an infant (de- 
ceased). Dr. Furnace was reared a farmer, but began read- 
ing medicine in Waynesville, Ohio, and in 1863 began the 
practice of his profession. He graduated from the Homeo- 
pathic department of Pulte Medical School, Cincinnati, Ohio, 
in 1875, after having practiced thirteen years. He came to 
Richmond in 1881, where he now has a good practice. He 
was married in 1853 to Bethiah Mosher, a native of what is 
now Morrow County, Ohio. To them have been born eight 
children, but five of whom are living — Mary, wife of William 
T. Frame; Seth W., Eunice, Phoebe and Robert H. 

Ahratn Gaar. — In all ages there has been no class of litera- 
ture more sought after in public libraries, and its pages more 
earnestly perused, than that of biography, and especially is 
the history of men's lives interesting, who entered the wilds 
of any new country and claimed the virgin soils as their 
heritage. The reader finds it wonderfully absorbing from 
the first to the last chapter, and then there is a powerfu 
impulse to read it over and over again. The trials, and suc- 
cesses of the early settlers; their wars and treaties with In- 
dians; captures, escapes and almost miraculous recoveries of 
women and children; great conspiracies, which only lacked 
success to change the history of our country and turn back- 



CITY OF KICHMOND. 1Y7 

ward for a whole centurj'^ the course of civilization; romance, 
sentiment, toil, tribulation and gigantic achievements of a 
class of brave and hardy men and women, of whom their de- 
scendants can not learn enoagh, will probably never iind a 
more complete and attractive record than in the present 
volume. 

Had not Homer tuned his lofty lyre, observes Cicero, the 
valor of Achilles had remained unsung. The valor of our 
pioneers was never surpassed, and with another Homer to cele- 
brate their achievements the grandest epic in all literature 
would enrapture our age. 

In the class of pioneer settlers of Wayne county to whom 
such honors are due, we record that of the Gaar family, who 
have from 1807 brilliantly marked a pathway in the history 
of Wayne County. 

The family are of German extraction, but the time the an- 
cestors tirst stepped on American soil is not definitely known. 
Abraham Gaar (grandfather of the President of Gaar, Scott 
& Co.'s Machine Works) was born in Hanover County, Va., 
Feb. 28, 1796, and grew to manhood in his native State, a liv- 
ing witness to many of the hardships of the war that freed 
America from English tyranny. He married Dinah Weaver 
who was also a native of Virginia and of German extraction. 
In 1805 they with their family moved to Kentucky, but 
afterward thought a more desirable location could be found 
and accordingly, in the spring of 1807, made their advent 
into what is now Boston Township, Wayne Co., Ind. Here 
Abraham entered from the Government a quarter-section of 
wild land. The programme was first to fell the trees and 
open out a spot on which to raise the necessaries of life to- 
gether with that of erecting a rude log cabin in which to 
move his family. Ere long the bleak winds of winter began 
to play about the pioneer's home, and chinking and plastering 
the openings in the log hut became a duty, in order to secure 
comfortable quarters for the winter. Even in this early day, 
when churches and the glad tidings of salvation were seldom 
proclaimed aloud, .this noble family never neglected the 
duty to their God, hence were ever faithful members in the 
regular Baptist church and were noble assistants in estab- 



178 HISTORY OF WAYNE COUNTY. 

lishing a church of their choice. They were ever active in 
every good work. He succeeded well through life; although 
he came to Wayne County comparatively poor, by good 
management, willing hands and a brave heart he accumu- 
lated a good property. Aug. 20, 1861, ended the earthly 
career of one of the noblest pioneers of Wayne County, viz.: 
Abraham Gaar. His wife, Dinah, died Sept. 26, 1834, aged 
sixty-six years, ten months and one day. 

They were the parents of eight children — Jonas; Fielding, 
who died in Utah; Larkin, who now resides on the old home- 
stead in Boston Township; Abel, now resides in Michigan; 
Fannie, deceased, wife of William Lamb, of Iowa; Rosa, 
deceased, wife of John Ingels; Martha, wife of Jeptha Tur- 
ner, and Eliza J., wife of Thomas Henderson, of Iowa. Jonas, 
the father of our subject (Abram), was born in Madison 
County, Ya., Feb. 1, 1792. He and his younger brother, 
Fielding, were both soldiers in the Indian^war of 1812, doing 
dutj' on the frontier in defense of the homes and lives of the 
border settlers. Jonas being a youth of fifteen when his father 
settled in Eastern Indiana among the wilds of nature, it be- 
came his duty to assist in clearing up his fathers farm, which 
he nobly performed. On reaching his majority, having ac- 
quired a lilnited education only, in the pioneer schools, he 
thought it advisable to take up some trade and accordingly 
settled upon that of cabinet-making, and in 1820 settled in 
the hamlet of Richmond to conduct his trade, where he con- 
tinued several years. He was a man of progress and ad- 
vancement, and in 1835 he, in company with Abel Thornley 
and Job W. Swain, established a foundry and machine shop, 
which was put into operation by the water draining from a 
swamp into the river near where the present county jail is 
located. This enterprise only survived a few years, and 
for about one decade he was identified with other interests. 
In 1849 he, together with his sons Abram and John M., and 
son-in-law, Wm. G. Scott, bought of Jesse M. and John A. 
Hutton, their machine works, which later grew into the ex- 
tensive spring foundry, eubsequently into the Gaar Machine 
Works, and lastly into the Gaar, Scott & Co.'s Machine 
Works. Jonas Gaar lived to be identified in the history of 



CITY OF KICHMOND. 179 

the above works until Jane 21, 1875, when death released his 
earthly cares. He was through life an active worker in all 
causes tending to elevate society and to the upbuilding of 
mankind. His wife, to whom he was joined in 1818, was 
Sarah "Watson, a native of Kentucky, and died Nov. 8, 1863. 
They had eight children — Abram, born Nov. 14, 1819; Ma- 
linda, born Nov. 11, 1821; John Milton, born May 26, 1823; 
Samuel W., born Oct. 22, 1824; Fielding, born Jan. 1, 1827; 
Emeline, born June 16, 1829; Elizabeth, born July 27, 1831 ; 
Fannie A., born Oct. 5, 1833. Abram, the eldest of the 
family, and now President of the Gaar, Scott & Co. Machine 
Works, is a native of Wayne County. His father moved to 
Richmond when he (Abram) was in infancy, hence he has 
been almost a life-long citizen of the city of Richmond. His 
boyhood and youthful days were spent in his father's cabinet 
shop together with some time in the primitive schools of 
that day. Having been an apprentice with his father a few 
years, in 1835, when his father engaged in the foundry, 
Abram being a natural mechanic, worked at pattern-mak- 
ing, building wooden machinery, etc., though but about 
eighteen years old, but misfortune soon over-took his father 
and Abram was soon out of employment in that institution. 
During the years of 1839 and 1840 he worked with Ellis 
Nordyke at millwrighting. At this period hard times were 
inevitable and he gave up mechanics for a time and turned 
his attention to a literary pursuit. He attended school for 
some time and in 1842 closed his last session with James M. 
Poe as teacher. In 1843 he resumed mechanical labor by 
engaging with J. M. & J. H. Hutton in the Old Spring 
Foundry machine shops. Here he devoted his time closely 
letting his wages stand until 1849 when he, his father, 
brother J. M., and brother-in-iaw Wm. G. Scott bought the 
foundry and started under the name of A. Gaar & Co. Here 
the foundation was laid for the future extensive manufactory 
of Indiana. From this junction to the present Mr. Garr 
has been closely identified with the works. Politically Mr. 
Gaar was reared a Democrat and so continued until the re- 
peal of the Missouri Compromise, when he left the party 
and became a Republican from that time forward, although 



180 HISTOKY OF WAYNE COUNTY. 

he is not an office seeker. He belongs to no secret order, 
but has at all times been in sympathy with and advocated 
the cause of temperance. In 1867 Mr. Gaar became a mem- 
ber of the Methodist Episcopal church, to which his wife, to 
whom he was joined March 26, 1851, also belongs. He has 
always been a liberal contributor in all enterprises tending to 
elevate mankind and society, and toward the erection of the 
First Methodist Church in Kichraond in 1883, he contributed 
over $5,000. In 1868 he was elected one of the Trustees of 
the Home for the Friendless Women, where he served about 
nine years without remuneration, which he did cheerfully. 
In 1876 he erected a very superior residence on his farm two 
miles from the city, where he now lives with every comfort 
and pleasure necessary to life. 

C. A. Gaar, pattern-maker, son of A. Gaar, was born 
April 13, 1859, in Richmond, where he has always resided. 
He learned the pattern-maker's trade, and has worked in the 
establishm.ent of Gaar, Scott & Co, several years. He was 
married to Fannie McMeans, who was born Oct. 5, 1864, and. 
is a daughter of A.'L. McMeans, of this city. 

John M. Qaar, of the firm of Garr, Scott & Co., is a son 
of Jonas Gaar. He was born in Richmond, May 26, 1823, 
and in early life he learned his trade in his father's shop. 
He has been connected with the extensive machine works 
from its organization as stockholder and Director, and has 
served most of the time as Treasurer. Within the last few 
years he has devoted his time to stock-raising and attending 
to his extensive farm in Henry County, Ind. He was mar- 
ried. Jan, 20, 1818, to Hannah A. Rattray, who died June 6, 
1819, and Sept. 16, 1856, he was again married to Helen M. 
Rattray, who was born March 2, 1840. 

Samuel W. Gaar^ of Gaar, Scott & Co., was born Oct. 
22, 1824, in Richmond, a son of Jonas Gaar. He received a 
limited education in the common schools, and when fourteen 
years of age began working in the blacksmith's shop of the 
Richmond foundry, remaining there till 1841, having been 
one of the leading smiths for a number of years. When the 
machine works were reorganized and changed to Gaar, Scott 
& Co., he became one of the stockholders. Oct. 19, 1865, he 



CITY OF RICHMOND. 181 

married Mrs. Elizabeth (Kirklen) Townsend, widow of Will- 
iam Townsend, and a native of Preble County, Ohio, born in 
1832. She has four children— Clinton, William, Henry and 
James. Mr. Gaar has been a member of the I. O. O. F. 
fraternity a number of years. 

Jacob Getz was born in Wirtemberg, Germany, in Decem- 
ber, 1832, a son of John and Mary Getz. His parents were 
in limited circumstances, and being one of five children, his 
educational advantages were meager. His parents died when 
he was quite young, and in 185.4 he came to America and 
settled in ]^ew Jersey. In 1857 he removed to Ohio, and in 
1858 to Richmond, Ind. He worked in the oil-mill till 1861, 
when he enlisted in Company D, Eighth Indiana Infantry, 
for three months. In the fall of 1861 he enlisted for three 
years in Company C, Second Indiana Cavalry. He partici- 
pated in the battles of Pittsburg Landing, Yinegar Hill and 
Gallitan. In the fall of 1864 he returned home and again 
went to work in the oil-mill, remaining there seven years. 
He then opened a grocery and provision store at No. 829 
North Tenth street, where he is doing a good business. He 
was married in 1866 to Setta Sheibler. They have two chil- 
dren — John J. and Clara E. Mr. and Mrs. Getz are mem- 
bers of the St. Paul's Evangelical Lutheran Church. He is 
a member of the Odd Fellow's order and the German Benev- 
olent Society. 

Josiah Gilbert was born in Wales, and when a child was 
brought to America by his parents. He grew to maturity in 
North Carolina, and married Mary Nixon, a native of that 
State. About the year 1812 he moved with his family to 
Wayne County, Ind., and entered a large tract of land, a 
part of which lies in the south part of Richmond. He 
cleared and cultivated this land to a considerable extent, and 
about 1830 he entered a large tract of land in Dudley Town- 
ship, Henry Co., Ind., where he resided till his death. His wife 
survived him several years. Of his children, Morris, the second 
youngest, was born in 1817, south of Richmond. He followed 
farming through life, and died in Plainfield, Ind., in February, 
1880. He was twice married. His first wife was Elizabeth, 
daughter of John Elliott, of Wayne County, and to this 



1S2 HISTORY OF WAYNE COUNTY. 

union two children were born. J. B., the youngest, was born 
in Henry County, Ind., in 1840, and in 1860 came to Rich- 
mond, where he was employed as clerk till 1866, since which 
he has been in business for himself, and is the oldest boot 
and shoe merchant in the city. Since 1869 he has occupied 
the store at 820 Main street, where he carries a full line of 
boots and shoes, and has in his employ eight regular sales- 
men and three workmen. He is a genial good fellow and 
has a big trade. 

Isaac A. Gormoii^ SheriflP,. Wayne County, Ind., was born 
in Highland County, Ohio, Dec. 25, 184Y, a son of John W. 
and Priscilla (Johnson) Gormon. His grandfather, John 
Gormon, was a native of Virginia, of Irish descent. He 
married a lady of German descent. John "W. Gormon was 
a native of Ohio. In 1858 he removed to Centreville, Ind., 
where he and his wife now live. Our subject is their first 
child. He received a limited education. When sixteen 
years of age, Sept. 3, 1863, he enlisted in Company E, Seventh 
Indiana Cavalry, but only served four months, when his father 
took the proper steps to have him released. In 1864 he began 
working at the blacksmith's trade at Louisville, Ind., and 
subsequently worked at different places in the State, and 
came to Richmond in 1866, worked in different shops, and in 
1868 commenced work for Stratton & Finney; worked seven 
years. He then opened a shop with William L. Thomas. In 
1878 he was appointed Deputy Sheriff under William H. 
Trindle, and in the fall of 1882 was elected Sheriff, running 
ahead of his ticket by several hundred. Politically he is a 
Republican. He is a member of the Odd Fellows' fraternity, 
having taken all the degrees, and also in the encampment. 
In 1875 he represented his lodge in the Grand Lodge of Indi- 
ana. He is also a member of the order of Red Men, the 
Independent Order of Mechanics, and a charter member of 
lola Lodge, No. 53, K. of P. Mr. Gormon was married in 
1871 to Mrs. Mary E. (Strickler) Moore, daughter of John 
Strickler. They have one son. 

Howell Graves. — The Graves family were among the ear- 
liest settlers of Wayne County, coining here in 1816. Jacob 
Graves, the grandfather of our subject, died soon after com- 



CITY OF RICHMOND. 183 

irig to Richmond. His wife died in Delaware. They were 
the parents of five sons — Enos, Jonathan, Jacob, Nathan and 
John. The four former came to Wayne County, but the 
latter remained in Delaware. Enos settled about four miles 
northeast of Richmond, and cleared a farm. He brought a 
family of wife and six children with him, none of whom are 
living. Jacob brought a wife and eight children to Wayne 
County, only one of whom, Joseph C, now lives in Wayne 
County. He was by trade a tailor, but only worked at it a 
little after coming to the county.. He was a strong anti-sla- 
very man and a staunch Whig and Republican. He died soon 
after Lincoln's proclamation. Nathan settled three and a 
half miles from Richmond, and followed farmine: throuo-h 
life. He was twice married. By his first wife he had four 
children and by his second, five. Jonathan L. married Lydia 
Howell in Delaware, and in 1816 came to Wayne County 
and bought 240 acres of land at $8 an acre. He erected a 
saw-mill on Middle Fork of Whitewater River. He was 
politically a Whig, and was a prominent member of the So- 
ciety of Friends. He died in 1825, leaving a wife and seven 
children. The wife died in 1846. Of the family there are liv- 
ing two — Howell and Warner, in Wayne County, the latter on 
the old homestead. Howell Graves was born in Wavne 
County in 1818. He followed farming till 1861, when he 
moved to Richmond, and for twenty years was one of the 
principal iron merchants of the city, but is now in the in- 
surance and real estate business. He was married in 1845 to 
Hannah C. daughter of John and Esther Nicholson. They 
have four children — Esther A., wife of Joshua S. Rich, of 
Richmond; Emma, wife of Joseph M. Bayliss, of Wayne 
Township; Yernon D., an attorney of Richmond, and Jo- 
sephine. 

J . C. Hadley, son of James and Ann (Underwood) Had- 
ley, and grandson of Jeremiah and Mary (Dickey) Hadley, 
was born in Highland County, Ohio, in 1814. His grand- 
father was a native of North Carolina, of English and Scotch 
descent. He died when forty years of age. His grandmother 
lived till nearly 100 years of age. James Hadley was their 
third son, and after liis marriage, in 180G, settled in High- 



184 HISTORY OF WAYNE COUNTY. 

land Count}-, Ohio, cutting a road through on his way. In 
1817 he removed to Clinton County, Ohio, where his wife 
died, March 19, 1845, and he Aug. 19, of the same year. 
Of their eleven children, only two are now living — James, of 
Dublin, Wayne Co., Ind., and our subject. J. C. was reared 
a farmer and received a common-school education. In March, 
1854, he came to Richmond, Ind., and engaged in merchan- 
dizing, but was obliged to abandon it on account of failing 
health, and bought a farm, where he resided a few years. In 
1861 he engaged in the fire insurance business. In 1878 he 
was elected Township Trustee, and re-elected in 1880. In 
January, 1883, he was appointed Secretary of the Eichmond 
Board of Underwriters. Mr. Hadley was married in 1837 
to Emeline Hinman, of Clinton County, Ohio. They have a 
family of seven children, only two now living — William L. 
and Clark H. They are members of the Society of Friends, 
Mr. Hadley being Treasurer of the Whitewater Monthly 
Meeting of Friends. 

W. B. Hadley^ Quaker Chair Company, was born in Clin- 
ton County, Ohio, in 1830, a son of Jacob and Mary (Butler) 
Hadley, the former a native of North Carolina, and the latter 
a native of Georgia, and a daughter of Bail Butler, an early 
settler of Wayne County, Ind. They died in Clinton County, 
Ohio. Seven children were born to them, our subject being 
the third child. He was reared to farm life, receiving only 
a common-school education. He first engaged in merchan- 
dizing in his native county, and later was in the oil business 
in Pennsylvania. He moved to Richmond in 1866, and en- 
gaged in the grain trade, but later in the mercantile business. 
He then manufactured hubs and spokes till 1879, since which 
he has been in the chair factory. His wife's name was Re- 
becca J. Bradley. They are the parents of two daughters. 

Benjamin Harris. — Among the earliest settlers of Dear- 
born, now Wayne, County, Ind., who were prominent in pro- 
moting its advancement may be mentioned the Harris family. 
The great-grandfather of our subject was born in Wales, but 
was banished from his native land when a young man, on ac- 
count of his Protestant ideas, and came to America, locating 
in the Atlantic States. His family consisted of three sons 



CITY OF RICHMOND. 185 

and two daughters. James settled in Eichmond, Ya., where 
he became wealthy. One daughter married a Mr. Lynch, 
founder of Lynchburg, Ya. Of Robert and the other daughter 
but little is known. Obediah, the grandfather of our subject, 
was a Quaker preacher, and settled in Guilford County, N. 
C, where he lived till 1810, when he came to Indiana and 
settled in New Garden Township, Wayne County, in early- 
life he was very active and energetic, and possessed a wonder- 
ful power of endurance, but as his age advanced his weight 
increased, and for many years before his death it exceeded 
300 pounds. He lived in Wayne County about twenty years, 
when he died aged over fourscore years. He had a family 
of three sons and five daughters — Mary, afterward Mrs. John 
Chipman; Sarah, afterward Mrs. Richard Mendenhall; Ra- 
chel, afterward Mrs. Abijah Jones; Judith, afterward Mrs. 
Jacob Cook; Rebecca, afterward Mrs. Mathew Allman ; David, 
died when a young man, in North Carolina; Obediah and 
Benjamin. Obediah settled in Wayne County about the time 
of the war of 1812, and followed farming in New Garden 
Township. He was a strict member of the Society of Friends 
and served as a preacher many years. About 1820 he re- 
moved to Randolph County, where he died in 1858, aged 
eighty-three years and seven months. He first married 
Marie Mendenhall, who died in North Carolina. They had 
three children. He afterward married Mary Moorman, who 
died in Randolph County in 1844. She was the mother of 
nine children. He then married Mrs. Nuby, who died in 1853. 
His children were— Thomas, David, Rachel, Betsey, Susanna, 
Jonathan, John, Obediah, James, Ruth, Jesse M. and Mary. 
Jesse M. was born in Richmond, Ind., Aug. 27, 18] 6. In 
1837 he began the study of medicine with Stanton Judkins, 
M. D., of Fountain City, and subsequently was with Richard 
Pretlow, M. D., of Richmond. He attended Ohio Medical 
College, Cincinnati, two terms, and in 1841 began practicing 
in Henry County, Iowa. In 1850 he returned to Richmond 
where he still resides. He was married in 1843 to Gulielma, 
daughter of William Harvey, of Richmond. She died in 
1856 leaving two children — Abanus and George W. He 
then married Emily J., daughter of David Hampton, who 
13 



186 HISTORY OF WAYNE COUNTY. 

died Jan. 5, 1S81, leavinor three children — Jane M., Mary L. 
and Francis. Benjamin Harris, Sr., father of our subject, 
was married in North Carolina to Margaret Ingle, and in 
1807 they came to Indiana. He entered a quarter-section of 
land, wliich he improved and lived on till his death, in 1850. 
He was a man of more than ordinary ability, and at the time 
the county seat was moved from Salisbury to Centreville 
was one of the County Commissioners favoring the removal. 
In religion he adhered to the faith of his father. He had 
a strong constitution and weighed 200 pounds. His wife 
survived him till 1853. They were the parents of fifteen 
children, two of whom died in North Carolina. We give the 
names of those who grew to maturity; the five youngest 
were born in Wayne County — Obediah, Pleasant, James, 
Barsheba, John, Benjamin, Rebecca, Sarah, Margaret, David, 
Aaron, Elizabeth and Nathan. Benjamin, our subject, was 
born in Guilford Count^^, N. C, Nov. 3, 1798. He has been 
a farmer and stock-raiser through life, paying special atten- 
tion to the hitter industry. He was very successful but by 
his confidence in his fellow men , was reduced to medium 
circumstances, although he is now again in the enjoyment 
of affluence, and is living retired from active business pursuits. 
Politically he has been a Whig and Pepublican, and was one 
of the first in his township to take a decided part in the anti- 
slavery movement. He was married in 1821 to Lydia Pliatt, 
a native of Yirginia, and at once settled on his farm in 
Green Township, where his wife died in 1867. In 1869 he 
moved to Richmond, and in April, 1870, married Hannah A. 
Estell, of New Jersey. To Mr, Harris and his first wife were 
born ten children — Cynthia, widow of Nathan Fisher, of 
Oregon; Winston, of Green Township; Addison, of Fountain 
City; Sarah, wife of Ensley Overman, of Webster Township; 
Nancy, wife of Joseph Conner, of Logan County, Mo. ; Mary, 
wife of Nathan Overman, of Grant County, Ind.; Susan, 
deceased wife of Simon Bond, of Webster Township; Minerva, 
wife of William Wilcoxen, of Nebraska; James M., a physi- 
cian of Yellow Springs, Ohio, and Martha J., of Nebraska. 

Joshua W. Haines was born in Burlington County, N. J., 
in 1815, a son of Joshua W., and grandson of Joseph Haines, 



CITY OF KICHMOND. 187 

of English and Welsh descent. He was reared on a farm and 
acquired a fair education at Westtown College, a Quaker 
school, twenty-four miles from Philadelphia. In early man- 
hood he taught school, and in 1840 taught the second school 
in the Academy at Dublin, Wayne County, Ind. He subse- 
quently was connected with mercantile pursuits in Trenton, 
N. J., and Philadelphia, Pa. In 1851 he came to Richmond, 
and established the first dry-goods store on the cash system 
in Richmond. He continued in business till 1875 when he 
retired from the trade, but in 1878 became again eno-ao'ed in 
business. In 1880 his son took the stock to Muncie, Ind., 
and Mr. Haines is now living a retired life. In 1852 he was 
married to Mary Parrj', a native of Burlington County, JST. J., 
and a daughter of John R. and Letitia Penn (Smith) Parry. 
Her mother was a sister of Senator Oliver H. Smith, of 
Indiana, The Parry family are of Welsh extraction. Mr. 
and Mrs. Haines have had three children — Parry, Letitia, 
wife of Jason Evans Cook, and Francenian H., wife of Dr. 
Frank C. Dale, U. S, A. 

John Hatfield^ liveryman, Richmond, is the son of Thomas 
Hattield and grandson of Jonas Hatheld, who was born, 
reared and married in Pennsylvania. He removed to Ken- 
tucky about 1793, but shortly after settled in Montgomery 
County, Ohio. Early in the present century he settled on 
Greens Fork, Clay Township, Wayne Co., Ind., where he ex- 
perienced all the privations of pioneer life till his death, in 
1817. He was a member of the Society of Friends. His 
wife, Rachel, died at Washington, Ind. Their children — 
Thomas, Jonas, John, Nathan, Deborah, Rachel, Mary and 
Ann — all settled in Wayne County. Thomas, father of our 
subject, was a native of Pennsylvania, but came with his 
father to Indiana and bought a farm comprising the present 
site of Washington, which he cleared and laid out that village. 
He resided thera many years and followed the carpenter's 
trade and kept an inn. The latter part of his life was spent 
in Wabash, Ind,, until a few years previous to his death, 
when he returned to Washington, and died in 1853, His 
wife survived him till 1875, Their children were — Lydia, 
widow of John Martindale; Jonas; Richard, deceased; Mary, 



1S8 HISTORY OF WAYNE COUNTY. 

widow of George Gill; John; Matilda, wife of Charles Hob- 
son, of Kansas; Melinda, who was married to Cjrus E. Gales, 
but are both now deceased, and Jane, wife of Edwin Freel, of 
Huntington County, Ind. John Hatfield, whose name heads 
this sketch, is a native of Wayne County, where he has spent 
most of his life. He learned the carpenter's and cabinet- 
maker's trade at which he worked several years, but is now a 
prominent liveryman of Richmond. 

John JSenly was born in Wayne County, Ind., Aug. 11, 
1815, a son of Micajah and Gulielma (Charles) Henly. His 
father was the sixth of seven children of John Henly, a native 
of North Carolina, of English descent, and was born in the 
latter State in 1785. In 1812, with his father-in-law, Samuel 
Charles, and family, he came to Indiana and settled in Wayne 
County. He bought a farm of 160 acres two miles southeast 
of Hichmond, residing there till his death in 1857. His wife 
died in 1860, aged sixty-eight years. They were members of 
the Society of Friends. They had a family of eight children 
— Mary (deceased), wife of Hannon Hill; John, our subject; 
Rebecca, widow of Reuben Hunt; Samuel; Naomi, wife of 
Washington Hadley, of Lawrence, Kas. ; Martha, wife of 
Joseph E. Stratton, both deceased; Henry, deceased; Gulielma 
(deceased), wife of Mordecai Parry. Our subject was the 
eldest son and the duty of assisting his father devolved on 
him. His early education was limited, having to go from one 
to three miles to school. He remained at home till twenty- 
seven years of age. He learned the carpenter's trade and by 
applying- himself to study, acquired an average education and 
taught several terms of school. In 1842 he married Naomi, 
daughter of William Clawson, a pioneer of Wayne County. 
They had no children. Mrs. Henly died, and Mr. Henly 
subsequently married Mariam, daughter of Robert and Rachel 
Green, a native of Wayne County, Ind. They have one son 
—Robert M. 

James F. Hibherd, M. D., was born near New Market, 
Frederick Co., Md., Nov. 4, 1816, a son of Joseph and 
Rachel (Wright) Hibberd. His grandfather, Joel Wright, 
was a noted surveyor, and settled in Ohio in the early part of 
the nineteenth century. His parental ancestors were of Eng- 



CITY OF RICHMOND. 189 

lish birth and came to America with William Perm, settling 
in Fennsylvaua, where his father was born in April, 1879, 
and when still a child removed with his parents to Frederick 
County, Md., where, March 15, 1806, he married Rachel 
Wright. Of a family of five sons and one daughter but three 
sons are now living, the subject of our sketch being the 
youno^est. His mother died in 1844 and his father in 
1866. From 1825 to 1837 he lived with his uncle, Aaron 
Hibberd, near Martinsburg, Berkley Co., Ya., attending 
school and working on the farm and in the woolen-mill. He 
subsequently took a course in the Hallowell Classical School 
at Alexandria, Ya. In 1837 he took charge of his father's 
farm near Springboro, Warren Co., Ohio. Having chosen 
the medical profession as his life work, in 1838 he com- 
menced reading under his cousin, Dr. Aaron Wright. In 
1839-'40 he attended lectures at the Medical Department of 
Yale College, and Aug. 14, 1840, commenced practicing at 
Salem, Montgomery Co., Ohio. In 1848 he entered the Col- 
lege of Physicians and Surgeons, New York, and graduated 
in March, 1849. He was immediately appointed Surgeon 
of the Commercial Steamship Senator, which made a trip to 
Amazon River, Rio Janeiro, St. Catharines, Patagonia. Chili 
and the cities on tlie Pacific Coast of South and Central 
America, thence to San Francisco, Cal., the voyage consum- 
ing seven and a half months. He remained in California till 
1855, practicing medicine and dealing extensively in real 
estate. The fall and winter of 1855-'56 he spent in New 
York reviewing his medical studies. In June, 1856, he 
opened an office in Dayton, Ohio, but four months later re- 
moved to Richmond, Ind., where he has built up a large and 
lucrative practice. During the session of 1S60-'61 he filled 
the Chair of Physiology and Ceneral Pathology in the Ohio 
Medical College, Cincinnati. Dr. Hibberd is a member of 
the city, county, district. State, tri-State, Rocky Mountain 
and American Medicail associations, and has been President 
of all save the latter, of which he has served as First Yice- 
President. The doctor has written a number of medical 
essays and has recently reviewed a large number of medi- 
cal books for a prominent journal. The years 1869 and 1870 



190 HISTORY OF WAYNE COUNTY. 

were spent in traveling in the Old World, and were the 
means of increasing his store of general knowledge. Politi- 
cally he has affiliated with the "Whig and Kepublican par- 
ties, and although not an aspirant for office served in the 
Ohio State Legislature from 1845 to 1847. He was a mem- 
ber of the Eichmond City Council from 18T2 to 1874, 
and the two succeeding years was Mayor of Richmond. 
His parents were members of the Society of Friends, but 
since reaching manhood he has severed his connection with 
the society. He was for many years a member of the Odd 
Fellows fraternity ; was a member of the Grand Lodge, 
and was High Priest of the encampment at Dayton, Ohio, 
but in 1850 his papers were sent from Dayton to California 
and were lost, and he has never applied for reinstatement. 
Dr. Hibberd has been married three times. His first wife 
was Nancy D. Higgins, to whom he was married in March, 
1842, in Montgomery County, Ohio. In May, 1856, he mar- 
ried Catherine Leeds, in Richmond, and in April, 1871, he 
married Lizzie M. Laws. He has two sons — Elgar Grant, 
born April 24, 1844, and Wilton Leeds, born Sept. 3, 1858. 

Robert Hlll^ deceased, was a native of North Carolina, 
born Jan. 31, 1780, a son of William Hill. He was married 
Apiil 30, 1801, to Susannah Morgan, a native of North Caro- 
lina, born March 24, 1782. In 1802 they removed to Ohio, 
and settled on a farm near Cincinnati, on the present site ot 
Cumminsville, but in 1805 removed to Indiana and entered 
forty acres of land three miles east of Richmond, which lie 
added to from time to time till he owned 260 acres. Mr. Hill 
was a man of well-balanced mind, and his business was al- 
ways carried on systematically. Politically he was a Whig 
and was one of Wayne County's first representatives in the 
State Legislature, serving two terms. His wife died in 1827. 
To them were born ten children — Martha, William, Benjamin, 
Samuel, Elizabeth (widow of Charles Shute, Sr.), Mary (wife 
of William Parry), Peninnah (wife of Edward Shaw), Charles, 
Robert and George. Martha, William, Benjamin and George 
are deceased. Nov. 26, 1829, Mr. Hill married Mrs. Rebecca 
Lathrop, widow of Dr. Lathrop, of Waynesville, Warren Co., 
Ohio. She died August, 1871. Mr. Hill died Nov. 8, 1850. 



CITY OF RICHMOND. 191 

Samuel B. Hindman, foreman in the Wood machinery 
department at Gaar, Scott & Co.'s, was born near Reiley, 
Btttler Co., Ohio, Feb. 22, 1839. He attended the district 
school till thirteen years of age and afterward he attended an 
academy two winters. He was apprenticed three years at 
the druggists' trade and three years at the trade of wagon 
and carriage makers. In 1860-'61 he manufactured wagons 
in "Wilmington, Ohio, and in 1864 he engaged in the same 
business in Marysville, Cal. In 1864 he returned to Wil- 
mington, Ohio, and worked as a journeyman till 1868, when 
he became foreman of a carriage wheel factory. He occupied 
this position till 1875, after which he engaged in the grocery 
trade two years, and Dec. 1, 1877, he was appointed to 
his present position. Sept. 12, 1861, he was married to 
Samantha A. Mills. They have one son — •William D., born 
in Wilmington, Ohio, in 1865. Mrs. Hindman is a member 
of the Methodist church. His father, Andrew Hindman, 
was born in 1799 in Cumberland County, Pa., and in 1815 
emigrated with his parents to Butler County, Ohio. He 
graduated from the Cincinnati Medical College in 1821 and 
the same year he began practicing medicine at Brownsville, 
Ind. In 1828 he removed to Richmond where he followed 
his profession till 1834. He was also engaged in the manu- 
facture of horn combs, in connection with a Mr. Hamlin. He 
was married in 1821 to Margaret Trembly, who was born in 
1799 in !New Jersey and came to Butler County, Ohio, with 
her parents in 1806. She is of French and English parent- 
age. 

Omar L. Hittle, real-estate broker, Richmond, Ind., was 
born in Richmond, Aug. 31, 1853, a son of Squire L. and 
Anna C. (Byers) Hittle, his father a native of Butler County, 
Ohio, and his mother of Dauphin Count}', Pa. His father 
was of French descent, the name being originally spelled 
Hittelle. His parents settled in Richmond in 1839, where 
his father was engaged in looking after his own real estate. 
He died in April, 1875. He was one of the leading capital- 
ists of Eastern Indiana, and was a shrewd business man. He 
was a member of the Methodist Episcopal church, his wife 
being a member of the same church. Of their six children, 



192 HISTORY OF WAYNE COUNTY. 

Omar L. is the fifth. He was educated in Richmond. In 
1878 he erected the Hittle Block, a three-story brick building, 
stone front, 67 x 110 feet in size, on the corner of Ninth and 
Main streets. The first floor has three store rooms; the sec- 
ond floor fifteen ofiices, and the Masonic Hall occupying the 
entire third floor. Mr. Hittle is one of the enterprising 
young men of the city. He was married in 1877 to Mamie 
L. Patterson, of Richmond. 

Robert Hodgin is a native of North Carolina, where he 
learned the trade of an iron-maker. He came to Richmond 
in 1866 and since that time has been identified in the me- 
chanical department of the raih'oad shops. In 1879 he as- 
sumed the responsibility of foreman of the shops, being the 
successor of W. H. Converse. The present shops were 
erected in 1875, under the direction of the chief engineer of 
the Pittsburg, Cincinnati & St. Louis Railroad. Thej'^ are 
100 X 210 feet in size. Seventy hands are employed, and re- 
pair work is done for the First and Third divisions of the C, 
St. L. & P., G. R. & I. and the L. M. roads. 

/. R. Howard^ of the firm of I. R. Howard & Co., whole- 
sale grocers, 202 and 204 Ft. Wayne-avenue, Richmond, Ind. , 
is a native of Henry County, Ind., where he was reared and 
educated. In 1860 he removed from New Castle to Richmond 
and became a partner in a wholesale grocery in Rich- 
mond, the firm name being Howard & Grubbs. This firm 
was succeeded in 1871 by 1. R. Howard & Co. In 1876 
Mr. Howard erected his present business house, which is a 
two-story brick, 63 x 200 feet in size. Their trade is from all 
parts of Ohio and Indiana, and has been constantly increasing 
from the first. Mr. Howard is an energetic and reliable 
business man, and much of the success of the business is 
due to his management and farsightedness. 

James B. Rughes was born in Berks County, Pa., Feb. 24, 
1813. a son of John and Susan (Buchanan) Hughes, both 
natives of Berks County. In May, 1819, his parents re- 
moved to Cincinnati, Ohio, and shortly after to Springboro, 
Warren Co., Ohio, where his mother died May 21, 1821. In 
1826 his father came to Richmond, where in 1827 he married 
Hannah Cook, a native of Gloucester County, N. J. He died 



CITY OF RICHMOND. 193 

May 11, 1869, aged eighty -four years, and his second wife 
died Sept. 3, 1880. He had a family of six children — James 
B., Phoebe, John P., Eleanor S., Charles, and Susan, only 
two of whom, Charles and Eleanor, were married. Onr sub- 
ject learned the carpenter's trade of his father, and always 
followed that vocation. Although reared in a day when 
school advantages were limited, he acquired a good education, 
being well informed on all general subjects. He is a de- 
scendant of an old Quaker family, his great-grandfather com- 
ing to the United States with William Penn. His brother, 
John P., was a soldier in the Mexican war, and subsequently 
went to the Sandwich Islands, where he died in March, 1869. 
His brother Charles and a son were soldiers in the war of the 
Rebellion, his brother three years and his son four months. 

C. B. Hunt, Secretary and Superintendent of the Rich- 
mond Castor Company, was born in llichmond. Ind., N^ov. 
23, 1845, son of Clayton Hunt. He was educated in the city 
schools and Earlham College. When fifteen years of age he 
went into his father's store, and four years later became a 
partner in the business, the firm name being C. Hunt & 
Sons. In 1868 the firm was changed to Hunt Brothers, and 
in 1872 C. B. Hunt became the sole proprietor. From 1879 
till 1882 he owned and carried on the grocery in the building 
now occupied by Thompson & Good. He was married in 
1866 to Fannie C. Hoffman, a native of Madison, Ind. Mr. 
and Mrs. Hunt are members of the Presbyterian church. He 
is a member of the Masonic fraternity. 

Clayton Hunt was born in Burlington County, N. J., June 
26, 1815, of Scotch descent, a son of John and Ann (Brown) 
Hunt. His father died in 1821 and his mother in 
1857. They had a family of six children — Joseph B. ; Susan 
B., wife of Richard Redrick; Esther W., wife of Abner Scott; 
Clayton, Benjamin, and Beulah. Esther and Clayton are the 
only members of the family now living. When he was thir- 
teen years of age his widowed mother settled in Preble County, 
Ohio. In 1832 he came to Richmond and learned the trade 
of a coach and carriage maker with Benjamin Fulghum, who 
had his shop where the Huntington Hotel now stands. After 
completing his trade he worked for Fulghum & Sayler. In 



194: HISTOKY OF WAYNE COUNTY. 

1836 he commenced business for himself where the Vaughan 
Block now stands. In 1838 he removed to the north part of 
the lot No. 80, North Seventh street, and in 1857 bought a 
lot and built the building now owned by Philip Schneider, 
in connection with property fronting on Main street, and con- 
tinued the carriage business until 1860, when he opened a gro- 
cery at 603 Main street, and for many years was the leading 
grocer of the city. In 1875 he retired from active business 
life. He served as a member of the School Board several 
years. Mr. Hunt is a member of the Society of Friends, 
as was also his wife. He has served the society as Treas- 
urer of the Indiana Yearly Meetings for about thirteen years, 
Overseer in the church for some twenty years and many other 
positions of trust. Mr. Hunt was married Nov. 29, 1837, to 
Elizabeth, daughter of John and Mary Starr. She was 
born in Philadelphia, Pa,, Aug. 6, 1814, and died in "Wayne 
County, July 29, 1881. They had a family of seven chil- 
dren — John S., of Minneapolis; Joseph B., of Idaho; Mary 
S., deceased; Clayton B., of Richmond; Esther H., wife of 
Elwood Morris; Joshua and Benjamin (twins), of Richmond, 
J. W. Jay, dentist, 718 Main street, Richmond, Ind., was 
born in Miami County, Ohio, Jan. 22, 1825. He is the eld- 
est son of Thomas and Eliza (Wareham) Jay, his father, 
of Welsh descent, born in Warren County, Ohio, and his 
mother, of German descent, born in Bedford County, Pa. 
His mother died in Grant County, Ind., aged sixty-three 
years. His father died in Grant County, Ind., Jan. 27, 1883. 
The subject of this sketch was the son of a man in limited 
circumstances, and in early life received but a common-school 
education. By his own efforts he attended Franklin Col- 
lege, Johnson County, Ind., and later spent nearly two years 
atEarlham College, Ind. In 18i6 he commenced teaching, 
an occupation which he followed for nearly eight years. In 
the meantime he took up the study of medicine with Dr. 
Jonathan Ellis, of Marion, Grant Co., Ind., and in the spring 
of 1855 graduated from the Eclectic Medical College, of Cin- 
cinnati, Ohio. He only practiced about three years and then 
studied dentistry at Indianapolis with Drs. Mofiitt & Stone 
man, commencing his practice in 1859 at Knightstown, Ind., 
and since 1870 has resided in the city of Richmond. 



CITY OF RICHMOND.' 195 

D. W. Johnston, foreman paintshop of Gaar, Scott & Co., 
is a native of Cliautauqua County, N. Y., born in 1837. He 
learned the painter's trade in Albany, N. Y., and in 1863 
came to Richmond, Ind,, and has since then been employed 
in his present position. He was married to E. J. Bates, of 
St. Johnsville, K. Y. They have seven children. Mr. John- 
ston has been a member of the Masonic fraternity since 1865, 
and now belongs to Webb Lodge, No. 24; King Solomon's 
Chapter, No. — ; Richmond Commandery, No. 8. He is ako 
a member of Indiana Consistory, S. P. R. S., and Whitewater 
Lodge, No. 24, I. O. O. F. 

L. M. Jones, of the dry-goods and carpet iirm, L. M. Jones 
& Co., was born in Wayne County, Ind., a son of Norris 
Jones. He was reared and educated in Centreville. When 
he was eighteen years of age he went into the recorder's of- 
fice and served as deputy a number of years. He then com- 
menced clerking for J. Forkner and in 1870 came with him 
to Richmond, and after his employer's death, Sept. 1, 1880, 
bought the stock and has since conducted the business under 
the Iirm name of L. M. Jones & Co. Mr. Jones was married 
in 1865 to Ella I. Forkner, a native of Centreville, and a 
daughter of J. Forkner. He is a member of the Masonic 
fraternity. 

Oliver Jones, a son of Robert D. and Elizabeth (Austin) 
Jones, was born in Wayne County, Ind., in 1832. His father 
was a native of Bedford, Pa. , of Welsh descent. He was by 
trade a miller, and after coming to Richmond was employed 
in a mill till his death in 1855. His wife survived him sev- 
eral years. She was the daughter of John and Mary Austin. 
Of their nine children but four are living, of whom Oliver is 
the eldest. He received a fair education in the city schools, 
and learned the molder's trade. In 1852 he began working 
in the Old Spring Foundry, and when it was formed into a 
]oint stock company, became one of the stockholders. He 
was married March 19, 1857, to Fannie, daughter of Jonas 
Gaar. They have six children — Jonas E., Walter E., Rosa 
E., Robert E., Sarah G. and Howard P. Mr. Jones was 
reared in the Society of Friends, his parents being members 
of that society. 



196 HISTOBY OF WAYNE COUNTY. 

Henry S. Kates was born in Philadelphia, Pa., in 1830, 
a son of Henry and Mary (Hentz) Kates, natives of Pennsyl- 
vania, of German descent. He was reared in his native city, 
receiving a good education. The early part of his life he was 
employed as bookkeeper and salesman in a wholesale grocery 
house, in Philadelphia. In 1856 he came to Pichmond, and 
was employed as clerk in the freight-office of the Indiana 
Central, Dayton & Western, now the Pittsburg, Cincinnati & 
St. Louis, Railroad. In 1861, he was appointed freight and 
ticket agent of the road, and serv^ed as such till the erection 
of the Union Depot, and in January, 1868, was appointed 
freight agent of the Chicago & Great Eastern Railroad. Since 
1871 he has given his entire attention to the freight depart- 
ments of the two roads, which have since that date been con- 
solidated. Mr. Kates has been an Odd Fellow since 1865, 
and a Mason since 1871. He has served as Treasurer of both 
orders, and is at present Treasurer of Webb Lodge, Ko. 24. 
He was married to Anna W. Gorgas, of Philadelphia, Pa. 
They have five children, three daughters and two sons. 

Richard H. King, City Clerk, Richmond, Ind., was born 
in Washington, D. C, in April, 1831, a son of Vincent King. 
In 1839 his parents moved to Ohio, and he lived there until 
1861, when he enlisted in Colonel (now Rev.) Granville 
Moody's regiment, and served three years. He participated 
in the battles of Stone River, Chickamauga, Chattanooga, 
and many skirmishes; was discharged in September, 1861. 
In 1868 he removed to Centre ville, Ind., and in 1871 was 
appointed Deputy Auditor. In 1873 he removed with the 
offices to Richmond, serving till l^ovember, 1875. He then 
served as Deputy Clerk about one year, and then was employed 
as a bookkeeper till July, 1878, when he was elected City 
Clerk. After filling the unexpired term of C. O. Clark, in 
May, 1879, he was elected for a term of two years, and has 
since served by re-election. He has been a member of the 
Masonic fraternity since 1861, and has taken all the degrees, 
as high as Knight Templar. He has taken all the degrees of 
the Odd Fellows order, having been a member since 1851, 
He is also a member of Lodge No. 8, K. of P., and of 
Sol. Meredith Post, No. 69, G. A. R. Mr. King was married 



CITY OF EICHMOND. 197 

in Greene County, Ohio, in 1854, to Mary A. Wliiteman. Of 
their seven children, two are deceased, 

George H. Knollenherg, merchant, 809 and 811 Main street, 
Eichmond, Ind., is a native of Richmond, born in 1847. 
When fourteen years of age he began clerking in the store 
of Messrs. Emswiler & Crocker, with whom he received a 
practical business education. After three years' experience 
as a clerk, he began business for himself in a small one-story 
frame building, on the site of his present place of business. 
The salesroom was but 18 x 24 feet in size, and he employed 
one clerk. His business gradually increased until he leased 
the room adjoining on the east. In 1877 he erected the larg- 
est and handsomest business house in the city. It is a three- 
story brick, thirty-six feet front by ninety feet deep, the front 
of iron and stone. The building is specially designed for the 
dry-goods business, and its internal arrangements like its ex- 
ternal appearance will compare favorably with leading dry- 
goods houses of larger cities. From the one-story frame 
building, in which was employed one clerk, has grown the 
leading industry of the city, giving employment to thirty-five 
people, and drawing trade from miles around. Mr. KnoUea- 
berg's enterprise and business tact has proved of lasting ben- 
efit to the city, and is deserving of especial commendation. 

P. R. Lackey^ Deputy Treasurer of Wayne County, Ind., 
is a native of Cambridge City, where he was educated. His 
father, Sanford Lackey, was born in Chillicothe, Ohio, March 
1, 1809, a son of John and Susan C. (Plumraer) Lackey, 
natives of Washington County, Pa., who in 1808 removed to 
Ohio, and settled near Chillicothe. After several years' res- 
idence in Ohio, he visited his old home, making the trip on 
horseback, and when on his return died within thirteen miles 
of Chillicothe. Of a family of ten children, eight are living. 
Sanford Lackey received a good education in the schools of 
Chillicothe and Cincinnati. He was married in 1829 to Mar- 
garet Rickey, who died in June, 1838, leaving three children, 
of whom two, Margaret and Kandace, are living. He after- 
ward married Jane Murphy, of Fayette Co., Ind. They have 
eight children. Mr. Lackey came to Wayne County in 1833, 
and opened the first store in Cambridge City, which he car- 



198 HISTORY OF WAYNE COUNTY. 

ried on thirty years, and in the meantime was appointed Post- 
master. He has given his attention largely to dealing in 
horses, cattle and hogs, in which he has been very successful, 
and is now one of the most prominent business men of Cam- 
bridge City. 

H. N. Land^ general superintendent for Gaar, Scott & 
Co., is a native of Oooperstown, Otsego Co.,]Sr, Y., born June 
14, 1832. His father, John Land, was a native of England, 
and came to America in early life. H. N. is the eldest of 
eight children. He lived in his native State till 1852, when 
he came to Richmond, and was employed by A. Gaar & Co. 
When that company was re-organized he purchased stock, 
and has since served as its superintendent, and is also one of 
the directors. He was married in June, 1854, to Emeline, 
daughter of Jonas Gaar. They have four children — Alma, 
Frank, Harry and Charles. 

Lewis F. Lantz^ Deputy Sherift of Wayne County, Ind„ 
was born in Centreville, Ind., Jan. 7, 1849. His father died 
in 1860, and he was reared by his mother, who, being in 
limited circumstances, was unable to give him more than a 
common-school education. When twelve years of age he 
began taking care of himself. He learned the wagon and 
cabinet making trades, and worked at them till 1878, when 
he was appointed to his present position, and removed to 
Richmond. He became associated with the Masonic frater- 
nity in 1871, and is now a member of the lodge, chapter, and 
commandery. In 1875 he married Mary C. Carroll, who 
died in December, 1876. April 27, 1882, he married Luella 
M. Gresh, of Milton. They have one son, Frederick, born 
Feb. 26, 1883. Mr. Lantz's father, Daniel Lantz, was born 
in Fairfield County, Ohio, in 1808, a son of Philip H. Lantz, 
of German descent. He was married in 1832 to Mary E. 
Wilson, of Pittsburg, Pa., born in 1816, of Irish descent. 
They moved to Centreville, Ind., in 1835, where he worked at 
his trade, wagon-making, till 1850, when, with others, he 
contracted the "gold fever" and started overland for Cali- 
fornia, but May 12, 1850, died, within forty miles of Salt Lake 
City. His widow still resides in Centreville, where she 
reared a family of eight children, Lewis F. being the youngest. 



CITY OF EICHMOND. 199 

L. L. Lawrence^ President of the Wayne Agricultural Com- 
pany, was born in Monroe County, N. Y., in 1821, a son ot 
Erastus and Harriet (Woodford) Lawrence, his father a native 
of Vermont and his mother of Hartford, Conn. He was 
reared and educated in his native State, and in 1847, with his 
father and brother, James W., came to Indiana and located at 
Dublin, where the brothers succeeded the Witt Brothers, man- 
ufacturers of stoves. They continued that business till 1852, 
retailing their stoves by teams over Eastern Indiana. In 
1852 they sold their shops to Binkley, Davis & Co., who be- 
gan the manufacture of threshers and farm implements. In 
1858 L. L. bought a third interest in the business, and the 
firm name was changed to Davis, Lawrence & Co. Jan. 20, 

1871, it was organized into a joint stock company, with a cap- 
ital stock of $80,000, with Norton Davis, President, and L. L 
Lawrence, Yice-President, the name being changed to the 
Wayne Agricultural Company. Since 1872 Mr. Lawrence has 
been President of the company. Nov. 17, 1873, the company 
increased their capital stock to $100,000. In 1875 Mr. Law- 
rence and Mr. Sutton were instrumental in having the enter- 
prise moved to Richmond, and at that time the company was 
organized, i-etaining the same name. The present Board of 
Directors are: L. L. Lawrence, William Baxter, David Sutton, 
B. G. Kelly, Edward Sutton and Hugh Moffitt. Mr. Baxter 
is Vice-President and Thadeus Wright, Secretary. Mr. 
Lawrence has through life been a practical manufacturer and 
is now at the head of one of the leading factories in Eastern 
Indiana. He was married in 1856 to Susan I. Underwood, of 
Washington City. 

Lemon c& Clark, insurance agents, corner of Eighth and 
Main streets, Richmond, Ind. This agency is a consolida- 
tion of the oldest agencies in Richmond, and represents a 
capital of over $100,000,000. In 1860 John C. Hadley com- 
menced the insurance business in Richmond, and soon built 
up a large business, which he held for a number of years. In 
1881 he retired from business, being succeeded by Chas. E. 
Lemon. Benjamin Strattan, after a long career in mercantile 
pursuits in Richmond, embarked in the insurance business in 

1872, and continued successfully therein for some ten years, 



200 HISTORY OF WAYNE COUNTY. 

being succeeded by O. P. Clark. The iirm ot Lemon & 
Clark was then formed, taking the agencies of all the com- 
panies formerly represented in the two old agencies. Mr. 
Strattan still remains at his old desk in the office, being iden- 
tified with the new firm. They represent the following well- 
known companies: ^tna, of Hartiord; Continental, of New 
York; Fire Association, of Philadelphia ; Fireman's Fund, ot 
California ; Franklin, of Philadelphia; Germania, of New 
York; Home, of New York; Insurance Co. of North Amer- 
ica, of Philadelphia ; Liverpool and London and Globe ; Lon 
don and Lancashire; New York Underwriters' Agency; Koyal, 
of Liverpool. These gentlemen occupy a neat and spacious of- 
fice in Odd Fellows' building, and have been very successful 
in building up a large business, their operations extending 
over Wayne County and lapping over into Preble and Darke 
counties, in Ohio. 

Rev. Orange Y. Lemon was born in Clarke County, Ohio, a 
son of William Lemon, who was born in Virginia, of Scotch 
and Irish descent, and died in Clarke County, Ohio, in 1815. 
Our subject was reared in Clarke and Champaign counties, 
Ohio, and was educated at the common schools. At the age 
of fourteen he connected himself with the Methodist Episco- 
pal church. In 1834 he with his wife removed to Laporte 
County, Ind., and in 1840 he was licensed to preach. In 
1841 he commenced as an itinerant minister, and continued 
his labors in the Northern part of the State until 1878, when 
he was superannuated. In 1855 he settled in Centreville, and 
since 1860 he has resided most't^w^mlime in Richmond. He 
served nearly a year as Chaplain of the Thirty-sixth Indiana 
Infantry. He has filled the positions of circuit preacher. 
Presiding Elder, American Bible Society agent, agent of 
Fort Wayne College, and agent of the Preachers' Aid Society. 

F. Lichtenfels, of the firm of P. Lichtenfels & Co., is a 
native of Richmond, Ind., born in 1845, a son of John C. and 
Eva (Baetz) Lichtenfels, natives of Germany, who came to 
America in 1833, and to Richmond in 1842. His father was 
by trade a baker, and established the first German bakery in 
the city. He died in 1852, and his wife in 1878. They had 
a family of four children. P. Lichtenfels was reared in his 



CITY OF RICHMOND. 201 

native city. In May, 1879, lie became established in his 
present business, at 622 Main street, remaining there till 
March, 1882, when, his business having increased, he removed 
to the Hittle Block, corner of Ninth and Main streets. They 
carry a stock of $25,000 and have a constantly increasing 
trade. Mr. Lichtenfels* was married in 1872 to Josephine F. 
Giltz, born in 1850, in Philadelphia, of German parentage. 
They have a family of two sons and two daughters. 

T. P. Logan was born in Glasgow, Scotland, May 29, 
1829. He learned the trade of a boiler-maker in his native 
country, and in 1850 came to America, and was first employed 
in Rogers' locomotive works in Paterson, N. J. He then 
worked in Belair's "Works in New York City, after which he 
worked in Phoenix Works in Chicago, 111. In 1859 he came 
to Richmond, Ind., where he has since remained, and since 
Jan. 1, 1864, he has been engaged as foreman of the boiler- 
room in Gaar, Scott & Co.'s establishment. He is a fine 
mechanic, and has considerably increased the capacity of the 
shop, in which he has abont sixty hands. He was married 
to Mary, daughter of Charles Arnold, of Richmond. They 
are the parents of seven children. Mr. Logan is a member 
of Whitewater Lodge, No. 41, I. O. O. F. ; Oriental Encamp- 
ment, No. 28,1. O. O. F.; Webb Lodge, No. 24, F. & A. M.; 
King Solomon's Chapter, No. 4, Royal Arch Masons; Rich- 
mond Commandery, No. 8, KnightsTemplar; A.& A. Scottish 
Rite, and Coeur de Leon, No. 8, Knights of Pythias. His 
father, John A. Logan, is residing in Chicago, 111. 

John S. Lyle, attorney at law, Richmond, Ind., was born 
in Yirginia in 1821, a son of David and Margaret (Scott) 
Lyle, his father a native of Rockbridge County, Va., ot Scotch 
descent, and his mother a native of the north of Ireland. In 
1823 David Lyle, with his wile and two children, removed to 
Richmond, Ind., where his wife died in 1835, and he subse- 
quently married Anne, daughter of Jeremiah Cox, and still 
later moved to Randolph County, where he died in 1851. At 
the time of his death he was a Justice of the Peace, and was 
a prominent man of the county. He was a brick-layer and 
stone-mason, and helped to build the first brick school-house 
in Richmond, on the site of the present First Ward School. 
14 



202 HISTOKY OF WAYNE COUNTY. 

Of his family but two are now living — John S. and "William 
B., of Crawfordsville, Ind. JohnS. was reared in Richmond, 
receiving his education in the common schools. In 1854 he 
was elected Justice of the Peace, and re-elected in 1858. In 
1862 he raised Company B, Fifth Indiana Cavalry, and was 
elected Captain, and soon after promoted to Major of the reg- 
iment; served three years and participated in many hard- 
fought battles. "When a boy he entered the Palladium office 
to learn the trade of a printer. After serving out his appren- 
ticeship he entered school. In 1841 he left school and went 
to work for Arnold BufFun, to print an Abolition paper at 
Newport. Two years later it was succeeded by the Free- 
Labor advocates. In 1842 he went to Philomath, Union 
County, Ind., to print a Universalist magazine for Jonathan 
Kidwell. From there he went to Cincinnati and worked in 
the Chronicle o^ce. In 1844 he returned to Richmond. After 
his return from the war he was appointed Deputy Prosecut- 
ing Attorney, and served till 1879. In 1871 he was elected 
City Attorney and served four years. For the past four years 
he has been Justice of the Peace. He was married in 1844 
to Caroline Finley, youngest sister of the late Hon. John 
Finley. They have one son, now a resident of Minneapolis, 
Minn., and an adopted daughter, who married John S. Hunt, 
eldest son of Clayton Hunt, and who now resides in Minneap- 
olis, Minn. 

Oeorge J. Maier, Principal St. John's Lutheran School, 
was born in "Wurtemberg, Germany, Oct. 6, 1836, a son of 
John and Agnes B. (Klett) Maier, both natives of Wurtem- 
berg. His father died in Germany, and in 1854 his mother 
and he came to the United States, and settled in Covington, 
Ohio, and in 1862 removed to Richmond. His father was a 
member of the Lutheran church, as is also his mother. He 
received a good German education in his native country and 
since coming to America has mastered the English language. 
"While in Covington, he worked at the carriage makers' 
trade, the trade of his father. After repeated calls he came 
to Richmond and took charge of St. John's School. The first 
fourteen years he was the only teacher, but he now has two 
assistants, with 175 pupils in attendance.. He teaches both 



CITY OF RICHMOND. 203 

German and English. He was married in 1864 to Lncinda 
Kosa, daughter of Renry William Kosa, They have a fam- 
ily of ei^ht children. 

A. L. McMeajis was born in Liberty, Union Co., Ind., 
Feb. 15, 1827, a son of Thomas and Mary McMeans, natives 
of Tennessee, of Scotch descent. His father died in Lewis- 
ville, Henry Co., Ind., Dec. 5, 1850, and his mother in New- 
Castle. Mr. McMeans received a common-school education, 
and in early life learned the harness-maker's trade, which he 
worked at till 1864. In the latter year he moved to Rich- 
mond, and since 1865 has been traveling for business houses 
of Richmond. He is among the oldest and most experienced 
commercial travelers of the city, and has been employed by 
leading firms, representing them in such a pleasing and re- 
liable manner as to make his services at all times of financial 
importance to his employers. Politically he is a Republican, 
having been identified with the party's interest since attain- 
ing his majority. He is a member of Richmond Lodge, No. 
254, I. O. O. F., and passed all the chairs in the Lewisville 
Lodge prior to coming to Richmond. In June, 1856, Mr 
McMeans was married to Ann L. Houston. To them have* 
been born five children, but three of whom are living. Mr 
and Mrs. McMeans are members ot' the Grace Methodist 
Episcopal Church, Richmond. 

H. H. Meerhojf\ wholesale and retail gas and steam fitter, 
and dealer in gas fixtures and all kinds of iron and wood 
pumps, iron and lead pipe, drive wells, sewer pipe, etc., 
Richmond, Ind., was born in Hanover, Germany, in 1829, a 
son of John H. and Anna E. Meerhofl^. His father died in 
1832, and his mother in 1833. They had two children — 
Ellen M., now the widow of Chris. Reitmann, of Cincinnati, 
and our subject. The latter came to America in 1848, his 
sister having preceded him in 1845. He reached Cincinnati 
on Christmas day, and soon after obtained employment at 
his trade, steam and gas fitting. In 1866 he removed to 
Oxford, Ohio, and the next year to Richmond. Since 1868 
he has been located at No. 9 South Ninth street, and is now 
one of the oldest steam fitters in the State, and has gained a 
reputation second to none. He received a common-school 



204r HIS'JORY OF WAYNE COUNTY. 

education in Germany, and after coming to America attended 
evening scliool to obtain a knowledge of Englisli. He has 
accumulated a good library and is well read, on all subjects of 
importance. He is a member of the St. Paul's Lutheran 
Church, and has filled several important offices. He is a 
member of Hermann Lodge, No. 199, I. O. O. F., Washing 
Lodge, No. 6. A. P. A., and Osceola Tribe, L O. K. M. Mr. 
Meerhoif was married in 1851 to Elizabeth Strantker, a na- 
tive of Hanover, Germany, born in 1826. They have had a 
family of eight children, six of whom are living. 

Absalom 3Ie)ide7ihaU, was horn OqL 25, 1805, in Clinton 
County, Ohio, a son of Stephen and Ann (Bell) Mendenhall, 
natives of Tennessee and North .Carolina respectively. Soon 
after their marriage they settled in Clinton County, Ohio, 
where the father died in 1840, and the mother survived 
several years. Our subject was the second of their seven chil- 
dren. He was reared on a farm and acquired a limited edu- 
cation in the primitive schools of his day in his native county. 
He was married Aug. 30, 1832, to Alice, daughter of Elisha 
Davis, of Huntington County, Pa. They were the parents of 
three children, two still living — Elizabeth A., a teacher for 
many years in the public and private schools, and Sarah J. 
In 1833 he left Clinton County moving to Henry County, 
Ind., where he bought a farm and followed farming till 1836, 
after which he bought his father's farm in Clinton County, 
Ohio, which he cultivated until 1852. He then purchased a 
farm in Wayne Township, Wayne Co., Ind., on which he 
lived until his removal to Richmond in 1871:. He was always 
an active supporter ot the Society of Friends. His wife died 
Feb. 19, 1873. Absalom Mendenhall died March 1, 1881, 
after a severe illness of ten days. 

W. H. Mlddleton^ is a native of Warren County, Ohio, a 
son of Joseph, grandson of Jehu, and great-grandson of 
Joseph Middleton, the latter a native of England, who came 
to America with his brother Richard, and worked in the dock 
yard at Philadelphia, Pa., subsequently removing to Bel- 
mont County, Ohio, where he died in 1828. Jehu Middleton 



CITY OF RICHMOND. 205 

Avas born in Augusta, Ga., and died in Fall Creek, Ind. He 
was a member of the Society of Friends. He married Eliza- 
beth Mills, of Welsh, Irish and Scotch descent. They had 
six children, of whom one died in infancy, and three are still 
living. Joseph T. is the eldest, and was born in Belmon 
County, Ohio, 'Nov. 3, 1805. In 1827 he removed to Warren 
Coimty, Ohio, and subsequently to Richmond, where he is 
now living with his son, W. H. He is by trade a mill- 
wright. W. H. Middleton was educated in Warren County, 
Ohio, and in Richmond. In 1861 he enlisted in the Fortieth 
Ohio Infantry, under Captain J. M. Hayworth, and served 
till Oct. 8, 1861. He participated in the battle of Middle 
Creek, and several skirmishes, and subsequently was taken 
sick and remained in the hospital till the expiration of his 
terra of enlistment. After he returned home he worked in 
the Miami Powder Mills, and in 1866 came to Richmond and 
for several years was engaged in building, but in 1871 was 
employed as foreman in his present mill, retaining the posi- 
tion till he became one of the proprietors. 

A. W. Jfey&r, proprietor of the Richmond Carpet Com- 
pany, 727 Main street, Richmond, Ind., was born in Prussia 
in 1845, and in 1853 came to the United States and settled in 
Cincinnati, Ohio; subsequently removed to Dayton, and in 
1869 came to Richmond. He learned the book-binder's 
trade in Dayton, and after coming to Richmond was em- 
ployed as foreman in Nicholson's bindery six years. He was 
then in business for himself in a grocery six years, and then 
in the queen's-ware business. In January, 1881, he became 
establislied in his present business, keeping purely a carpet 
house. C. H. Personett, formerly of L. M. Jones & Co., is 
the general manager. Mr. Meyer was a member of the Cit}'' 
Council from 1880 till 1882. He is a member of Richmond 
Lodge, No. 254, I. O. O. F., and Oriental Encampment, No. 
28. In 1876 he represented his lodge in the Grand Lodge of 
Indiana. 

Isaac Miller, deceased, was a son of Isaac, who was ot 
German birth. He came to America about 1760, and in 
1799 settled nine miles west of Dayton, Ohio, where he 
died. Our subject was born in Pennsylvania, Jan. 23, 



206 HISTORY OF WAYNE COUNTY. 

1783, and died near Cambridge City, Ind., July 22, 1861. 
He was reared to the life of a farmer in Ohio, and while 
there mari'ied Mary, daiiojhter of Christopher and Mary 
Witten, who was also of German extraction. She was 
born in Pennsylvania, Nov. 26, 1792, and died near Cam- 
bridge City, Ind., April 29, 1863. In 1826 they set- 
tled one mile northwest of Cambridge City, in the dense, 
unbroken forest, cleared out a farm and liv-ed on it till 
his death. They were members of the Dunkard's church. 
They had ten children — Samuel, now of Hamilton C unty, 
Ind.; Susan, wife of Jacob Sheidler; Elizabeth, deceasfd; 
Isaac, an attorney, Nashville, 111.; Abraham, of Crawf 'i-ds- 
ville, Ind.; Sarali, wife of G. M. Barns, of Mexico, Mo.; 
Aaron B., now of Andrews, Huntington Co., Ind.; Gtoi-i^^e 
W., carriage-maker of Indianapolis, Ind.; Catharine, de- 
ceased, wife of Benjamin White, and John W., who has 
been for a number of years a minister in the Methodist 
Episcopal church. Their children all lived to maturity 
and contributed to raise their home from its primitive state. 
They all married, and excepting two are still living. Their 
posterity are scattered over several States of the Union, and 
are engaged in agriculture, mechanics, arts, commerce, minis- 
try, law and literature. The family in all its branches has 
been remarkable for one thing — though reared amidst many 
temptations and opportunities to form habits of dissipation, 
there has not been a drunkard in the family, and nearly all 
of the posterity belong to eome religious society, among 
which we mention Dunkards, Albrights, Methodists and 
Lutherans. 

William JHo^ett, ticket receiver for the Chicago, St. Louis 
& Pittsburg Railroad Company and the Pittsburg, Cincin- 
nati & St. Louis Railway Company, at Richmond, Ind., was 
born in Richmond in 1845. His grandfather, William Moffett, 
with four brothers, James, Adam, Hugh and John, emi- 
grated from Scotland prior to the Revolutionary war. Will- 
iam settled in North Carolina. He was a soldier in the war 
for independence and died while in defense of his adopted 
country, leaving three children — John, Mary and Thomas. 
The latter was born in Virginia and there married Mary 



CITY OF RICHMOND. 207 

Brocon, and in 1810 immigrated to Indiana Territory and 
settled in "Wayne, now Union, County, near Abington. He 
subsequently moved to Rushville, Rush County, where he 
died. Of his nine children — Catherine, Martha, William, 
Julia, Maria, Wesley, Mary, Gardner and Jane— but one, Mrs. 
Chessman, resides in Richmond. William was but a child 
when his father came to Indiana. He was reared to pioneer 
farm life, but took up the study of medicine, completed his 
course and practiced about five years in Richmond, when he 
died. Of his children, William is the only one living. 
He acquired a good business education and when eighteen 
years of age obtained a clerkship in one of the Pan-Handle 
Railroad ofiices in Richmond. He has proved to be reliable 
and diligent and has since that time been employed by the 
company in diflerent capacities. He was for several years 
mileage clerk, and June 1, 1883, was appointed ticket re- 
ceiver. He has been a member of Whitewater Lodge, No. 
24, I. O. O. F., several years and has held diiferent offices in 
his lodge. 

Emil MincJc was born in Germany in 1832, and when fif- 
teen years of age came to America with his parents and set- 
tled in Columbus, Ohio, where he learned the brewer's trade 
of Hoster & Co., and in 1869 came to Richmond, Ind., where 
he has since lived. In 1872 he purchased the brewery, of 
which he is still proprietor. It was erected in 1832 by Jacob 
Buhl and is one of the oldest establishments of the kind in 
Eastern Indiana. Mr. Minck, in 1883, enlarged the build- 
ing, making it at present 40 x 60 feet, three stories high, with 
an ice-house 20x165 feet. He manufactures from .500 to 
1,000 barrels of lager beer a year. It is the purest kind and 
is mostly consumed by private families. Mr. Minck was 
married in 1852 to Margaret Boashantz, a native of Ger- 
many, born in 1830, and came to the United States in 1848. 
They have a family of four children. 

Ira Moore was born in New Jersey, Jan. 9, 1810, a son of 
Benjamin and Lydia (Shute) Moore. His mother is a native 
of New Jersey. His parents came to Wayne County, Ind., 
in 1818. They had a family of ten children — Ann, Ira, 
Matilda, Chankely, Caroline, Harriett, Hannah, Ruth, Lydia 



208 HISTORY OF WAYNE COUNTY. 

and Benjamin. Mr. Moore has always followed the vocation 
of a farmer. He has been a hard-working man, and has 
cleared away a great deal of the dense forests of the county. 
In 1882 he retired from farm life and settled in Richmond. 
He was married Feb. 8, 1834, to Mary, dauojhter of Benjamin 
Thorne. She was born in New Jersey, March 13, 181-1, and 
since 1832 has resided in "Wayne County. They have had a 
family of ten children — Oliver, Benjamin, Debroah A., 
Elizabeth, Lydia Ann, Alice, Rachel, Mary E., Ira and Isaac. 
Mrs. Moore is of English descent, her parents coming to 
Wayne County in 1832. 

Jonatlian Moore was born in North Carolina, July 6, 1806, 
a son of Josiah and Elizabeth (Wilson) Moore, also natives of 
North Carolina, of English descent. His great-grandparents 
were Truman and Leah (Hill) Moore, the latter a Welsh 
lady. His grandfather, Thomas Moore, was born Dec. 16, 
171:7, in North Carolina and married Isabelle Newby, also a 
native of North Carolina, born Feb. 3, 1755. He died in 
1840, aged ninety-three years. He had a family of eight 
children — Josiah, born May 11, 1779; Isabelle, March 13, 
1787; William; Jemima, died in North Carolina; Leah, born 
May 30, 1797; Jane, May 18, 1799; Marion, May 17, 1801; 
Thomas, July 3, 1803. Our subject's parents moved to Ohio 
in 1812, and settled in Highland County, and in 1816 came 
to Wayne County, Ind., and located two miles southeast of 
Richmond, where they bought eighty acres of unimproved 
land. The father died in 1857 and the mother in 1855. 
They had a family of ten children — Nathan, died in North 
Carolina; Jonathan, our subject; Lydia, deceased, married 
Thomas Hollo well; Isabelle, now Mrs. William F. Gray, of 
Huntington County, Ind. ; Anna, now Mrs. J. M. Wasson, of 
Richmond; Susan, of Richmond; Jesse, deceased; Elias, o 
Milton, Wayne Co., Ind., and two died in infancy. Our sub- 
ject was reared a farmer, but in 1830 came to Richmond, and 
began working at the shoe-maker's trade, following that oc- 
cupation till 1869. He then engaged in the real estate 
business till 1876. He was married June 4, 1834, to 
Eliza, daughter of Archibald and Elizabeth Wasson, who died 
Jan. 21, 1881, in her seventieth year. They were the parents 



CITY OF RICHMOND. 209 

01 eight children, but three now living, Elizabeth, Jesse 
W., Juliann, Elwood and Ellis died in infancy. Those living 
are — Joseph W., Jehiel F. and Charles H. They were reared 
in their native city. They all learned the shoemaker's trade, 
and Jehiel F. is still engaged in that business. Since 1 872 Joseph 
W. and Charles H. have been in yjartnership in the coal and 
wood business and are now one of the leading firms in the 
city. Joseph W. married Priscilla M., daughter of John C. 
and Fhoebe Brown, of Huntington, Ind. They have had 
three children, but one now living. Jehiel F. married Sarah 
T., daughter of John and Fhosbe Tyler, of Madison County, 
Ind. They have two children. Charles H. married Laura 
E., daughter of Joseph and Rachel Gibson, of London 
County, Va. They have one child. 

J. H. Moormann, grocer and stationer, 520 and 522 Main 
street, Richmond, Ind., was born in Hanover, Germany, May 
28, 1816, a son of John Casper and Elizabeth (Kohlbracher) 
Moormann. His mother died in 1832 and that same year his 
father came to the United States. After a voyage of thirteen 
weeks he landed in Baltimore. His reports of superior ad- 
vantages of this country were so favorable that in 1833 a 
number of his friends and son J. H. followed him to America. 
They came to Richmond in 183-1 and in 1836 went to 
Yicksburg,,but in 1837 returned North, and three days after 
their arrival in Cincinnati the father died. J. H, Moor- 
mann received a good German education in his native coun- 
try, and after coming to America took up the study of the 
English language. After the death of his father he returned 
to Richmond, where he has since resided. He clerked for 
Ward & Aiken, grocers, several years, and subsequently was 
engaged in farming and distilling. Nov. 16, 1846, he began 
business for himself and is now the oldest grocer in Rich- 
mond. He has been a Director of the First National Bank 
since 1861, and of the Cincinnati, Richmond & Ft. Wayne 
Railroad, and was Treasurer and Paymaster of the latter until 
its completion to Ft. Wayne. He has been City Commis- 
sioner eleven years. He was married in 1838 to Rachel 
Meisner, born in Switzerland County, Ind. Her mother 
moved to this county when Rachel was about six months old,- 



210 HISTOR"i' OF WAYNE COUNTY. 

JVat/um Morgan^ Jr., proprietor of the People's Meat Market, 
Fort Wayne avenue, Richmond, is the eighth child of Na- 
than Morgan, Sr. He was born in Wayne County, Ind., Nov. 
15, 1823, and obtained his education in the subscription 
schools. He grew to maturity in Richmond, and in 183Y he 
commenced learning the cabinet-maker's trade of his father. 
In 1846 he left Richmond for Baltimore, Md., where he was 
engaged in the car shops of the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad 
Company. June 29, 184Y, he married Frances I. League, of 
Baltimore, and in 1848 he returned to Richmond, Ind. In 
1853 he succeeded his father in business, but was obliged, 
soon after to abandon it on account of failing health, when he 
commenced as a traveling salesman. He then engaged in 
the butcher's trade, until Aug. 28, 1861, when he enlisted in 
the Second Indiana Cavalry at Indianapolis and served over 
three years. He participated in the battles of Corinth, Chicka- 
mauga, Perryville, Ky., and a number of skirmishes. In 1868 
he became foreman of the school-furniture department of the 
Ezra Smith & Co. Manufacturing Association, remaining eight 
years. During that period the Coffin Works were established, 
of which Mr. Morgan has been a stockholder since organ- 
ization. Since 1878 he has been engaged in his present meat 
market. To Mr. Morgan and wife have been born five chil- 
dren — Ida M., wife of O. Y. Lemon, Jr.; Emma R., wife of 
A. G. Ogborn; William L. carries on a meat market at 904 
Main street, Richmond; Lewis A., died in 1862, and 
George W. 

B. E. Morris was born in Allegheny, Pa,, Feb. 22, 1843, a 
son of Robert and Maria Morris, natives of Norwich, County 
of Norfolk, England. His parents came to America and 
were for many years residents of Pittsburg, where his father 
was engaged in the mecantile business, but failing liealth in- 
duced him to return to England in 1855, and he died there in 
1866, His wife died in January, 1880. Our subject was 
educated in the schools of Allegheny, Pa., and also attended 
the Bawburgh Hill school, near Norwich, England, two years. 
He subsequently returned to America and enlisted in the war 
of the Rebellion from Allegheu}' County, Pa., serving from 
the commencement until the close of the war. In 1865 he 



CITY OF RICHMOND. 211 

went to England and on his return took charge of the lost 
treight department of the Pittsburg, Fort Wayne & Chicago 
Railroad Company. Two years later he was appointed sta- 
tion agent at Freedom, Pa. In 1S69 he became connected 
with the Union Fast Freight Line at Pittsburg, Pa,, and a 
short time after, with the accounting department of the P., 
F. W. & C. R. R. Co. In June, 1872, he was appointed Travel 
ing Auditor of the P.,«C. & St. L. R. R. Co., to which has 
since been added the C, St. L. & P. Ry. Co., J., M. & I 
R. R. and the 1. & Y. R. R. Mr. Morris is a member of Webb 
Lodge, No. 24, A. F. & A. M. He was married Nov. 7, 1867, 
to Anna M. Sailor, of Allegheny, Pa. They have four chil- 
dren. Mr. and Mrs. Morris are members of the Presbyterian 
church- 

J. L, Morrisson was born in Richmond, Ind., Oct. 10, 
1817, a son of Robert and Jane (Price) Morrisson, natives of 
Orange County, N. C, his father born Oct. 19, 1786, and his 
mother in 1787. His ancestors were originally from Scotland, 
the date of their immigration to the United States not being 
known. His grandfather, James Morrisson, grew to manhood 
in Pennsylvania, and married Hannah, daughter of William 
and Catharyine White, of Omega County, N. C. They had a 
family of nine children — James, Catharine, William, Mary, 
Ruth, Robert, Hannah, Deborah and Simon. Robert and 
James came to Indiana in 1810; the latter was killed by light- 
ning. They first settled in Newport, Wayne County, pur- 
chasing a small farm on Middle Fork of Whitewater River, 
eight miles north of the city. In 1815 Robert Morrisson 
removed to the present site of the city of Richmond and 
opened a store on what is now the corner of Main street and 
Ft. Wayne avenue, afterward removing to the corner of Main 
and Fiftn streets. He also established a store in Liberty, Ind. 
He established a tannery in Richmond, which he subsequently 
sold to Daniel P. Wiggins. He was instrumental in having 
the National road piked through the count}', after ithad been 
turned over to the State. He was President and Superin- 
tendent of the road and did much to increase the value of 
property. Robert Morrisson was a man of public spirit and 
contributed largely to all enterprises tending to the elevation 



212 HISTORY OF WAYNE COUNTY. 

of mankind and society. One of the noblest achievements of 
his life was the establishing of the Morrisson Library. He 
was Legislative Director of the First State Bank of Indiana. 
''' - died in 1865 after having contributed larj^ely of his means 
to^.ard the suppression of the Rebellion and for the comfort 
of the soldiers. His wife died Aug. 17, 1849. They had a 
family of three children — Hannah, Jonathan and James L., 
the latter being the only one now living. He received a 
common-school education, always residing in or near Rich- 
mond. He devoted thirteen years to farming with his father. 
He has been identified with many of the improvements of the 
city and is an ardent supporter of all that pertains to the in- 
terests of Richmond. He was one of the organizers of the 
Richmond National Bank and was one of the Directors. At 
the same time he had an interest in the Citizens' Bank Since 
1875 he has lived retired from active business pursuits. He 
was married March 30, 1842, to Lydia C, daughter of Samuel 
Shute. They have lived on the corner of Ninth and North A 
streets since 1855. They have two children — Robert, now in 
the wholesale drug business in Chicago, III., and Elizabeth 
J., wifeof Elgar G. Hibbard, of Richmond. Mr. and Mrs. 
Morrisson are members of tlie Society of the Hicksite Friends. 
Eliku Morrow was born in Wayne County, Ind., Feb. 5, 
1817, a son of John and Mary (Stout) Morrow, natives of 
North Carolina, who in 1807 moved to Preble County, Ohio, 
and in 1809 to Wayne County, Ind. His father bought 160 
acres in Wayne Township for $400, nearly all unimproved. 
He was by trade a blacksmith and followed that occupation 
after coming to Indiana, exchanging work in the shop for 
having his land cleared. He joined the Society of Friends 
after reaching manhood, and faithfully adhered to its doc- 
trines through life, serving the society as a minister. He 
died in April, 1824, and his wife died in 1843. They had a 
family of nine children — Andrew, Joseph, Hannah, Mary, 
Ruth, John, Jane, Nancy and Elihu. The latter was but 
seven years old when his father died and he was reared on 
the farm by his mother. His educational advantages were 
meager. In 1853 he left the farm and engaged in the grocery 
business in Richmond. He married Anna H., daughter of 



CITY OF KICHMOND. 213 

Eli and Martha Brown, of Riclimond, Ind., born in 1818. 
They have had four children — Albert T., M. Eliza (died 
Sept. 15, 1853), John E. and James W. Mr. and Mrs. 

orrow are both members by birthright of the Friends' So- 
ciety. 

E. J. Mote was born in Miami County, Ohio, Sept. 21, 
1836. His great-grandfather was a native of England, and 
came to this country a short time prior to the Revolutionary 
war, and at its close, when the tide of emigration set in for 
the Southern States, he went with it accompanied bv a 
brother, and settled in the State of Greorgia, where numer- 
ous descendants still can be found. From here his grand- 
father, David Mote, emigrated to Miami County, Ohio, in 
1802, where he lived until his death in 1862. Here Mr. 
Mote's father, Luke S. Mote (a distinguished horticulturist 
and florist), was born in 18 12, and still resides. Mr. Mote, 
the subject ot our sketch, was reared in his native county, on 
a farm, working also a good deal at the nursery business and 
gardening, and teaching school during the winter seasons. 
He had inborn an insatiate thirst for knowledge, and the 
fine arts especially, and finally, in 1864, he severed his con- 
nection with his native place and came to Richmond, where 
he worked a considerable time at the machinist's business. 
But his health beginning to fail and this occupation not fill- 
ing his expectations in his search for knowledge, he finally 
left the shop and entered the photographer's studio, under 
the instructions of Maxwell & Estell, and eventually started 
in business for himself. A part of the time he was in part- 
nership with J. H. Swaine, but latterly with his brother, 
Wm. Aldine Mote, a fine workman and artist in crayons, oil 
and india ink. Thus for nearly twenty years he has been 
one of the leading spirits in the fine-art science of photog 
raphy. He now has turned his attention mostly to out-door 
view work, in which he excels, as brother photographers 
readily admit. In addition to his regular occupation, Mr. 
Mote is a hard student, occupying all spare time by day, and 
nightly burning the midnight oil in his studies in astronomy, 
chemistry, meteorology and geology. The last-named science 
especially is a favorite, and he has collected and studied the 



214 HISTORY OF WAYNE COUNTY. 

various fossils at Richmond, and, by exchanges, those ot 
other parts of the United States, until lie now has a cabinet 
or mnseain, inchiding archaeology, of no small value. This, 
together with his unflagging perseverance and a wonderfully 
retentive memory as to scientific nomenclature, giv^es him an 
advantage possessed by few, argues favorably for him yet to 
make his mark in the scientific world, should life and health 
be his for a few years longer. Mr, Mote was united in mar- 
riage with Hannah A., daughter of Isaac L. and Sarah 
Dickinson, on Dec. 2, 1869, at Richmond. They have an 
interesting family of six ciiildren, five sons and one daughter, 
growing up around them. 

Timothy Nicholson was born in Perquimans County, N. 
C, Nov. 2, 1828, a son of Josiah and Anna (White) ISrichol- 
son. He was reared on a farm, but I'eceived his education in 
the best schools. Prior to his eighteenth year his instruction 
was mainly received in the Belvidere Academy. He then at- 
tended the Friends' school at Providence, R. I., nearly two 
years, and subsequently was Principal of Belvidere Academy 
six years. At this time he took charge of the preparatory 
department of Haverford College, near Philadelphia, Pa., and 
four years later was given the general superintendency of the 
college. At the end of two years he resigned and moved to 
Richmond, Ind., in 1861, to join his brother John in the book 
and stationery business. He has at all times manifested an 
interest in all public enterprises. For nineteen years he has 
been a Trustee of Earlham College. From 1868 till 1875 and 
from 1877 to 1880 he was a Trustee of the Indiana State Nor- 
mal School, at Terre Haute. From 1872 till 1877 he was a 
Trustee of the Home for the Friendless, at Richmond. Mr. 
Nicholson has taken an active interest in the temperance 
cause from early life. For fourteen years he has been Clerk 
of the Yearly Meeting of Ministers and Elders of the Indiana 
Yearly Meeting of Friends, and was Clerk of the Whitewater 
Monthly Meeting, comprising four congregations, twelve 
years. He was married Aug. 11, 1853, to Sarah N., daughter 
of John and Mary White. They had a family of three sons 
and one daughter. His wife died Sept. 26, 1865, and April 
30, 1868, he married Mary S., a sister of his first wife. They 



CITY OF EICHMOND. 215 

have two daughters. Mr. Nicholson is a practical philanthro- 
pist, manifesting his regard for humanity chiefly through the 
channels of the church and of education and temperance, and 
with an interest that amounts to enthusiasm. 

William T. JVoMe, Clerk of the Wayne Circuit Court. — 
In the political, official and social circles of the State of In- 
diana none have figured more conspicuously than the ances- 
tors of our subject. The family are of English descent, but 
the time of their coming to America is not definitely known. 
Thomas T. JSToble, grandfather of William T., was born in 
Virginia, where he grew to manhood and married; subse- 
quently settled in Kentucky, opposite Lawrenceburg, Ind., 
where he died. He was a man of quiet, unostentatious dis- 
position, but of superior intellect. His six sons were all 
prominent men in the early history of Indiana, of each of 
whom we will speak briefly, our limited space forbidding an 
extended sketch of each. James was the first United States 
Senator from Indiana, serving continuously from 1816 till his 
death in Washington, D. C, Feb. 26, 1831. He was com- 
monly known as General ISToble, from his military-like step 
and erect bearing. He was married when seventeen years of 
age, to Mary Lindsay, of Newport, Ky. He soon after be- 
gan the study of law, and after his admission to the bar 
located in Brookville, Ind. He subsequently became the rep- 
resentative of Franklin County, to help frame the Constitu- 
tion, when Indiana was admitted into the Union as a State. 
Upon convening at Corydon, General Noble was appointed 
Chairman of the Legislative Committee, and was also a 
member of the Judiciary Committee. In August, 1816, he 
was elected to the State Legislature, which convened at Cory- 
don, Nov. 4; and Nov. 8, following, the General Assembly 
elected him to the United States Senate, in which he served 
nobly till his death. Lazarus Noble was the Receiver of the 
Public Land-office at Brookville, Ind., where he died in 1825 
in early manhood. Hon. Noah Noble was elected Governor 
of Indiana in 1828, and served till 1831:. He died in Decem- 
ber, 1842. George T. Noble was a native of Boone County, 
Ky., born March 2, 1801; and in 1832 moved to near Indian- 
apolis, and in 1834 moved to Greenwood, where he died Nov. 



216 HISTORY OF WAYNE COUNTY. 

2, 1883. He was twice married, and reared a family of six 
children, one of whom is Dr. Thomas Noble, and another, Rev. 
Samuel Noble, of the Methodist Episcopal church. Dr. Ben- 
jamin J. Noble was a practicing physician of Indiana, but in 
later life removed to Indianola, Iowa, where he died in No- 
vember, 1879. Thomas G. Noble was the fourth son, and 
was born in Kentucky, opposite Lawrenceburg, Ind., May 3, 
1799. He in early manhood located in Brookville, Ind., 
where he married Sarah J. Jacobs, March 13, 1827. They 
had a family of six children — Lazarus, Elizabeth, Sarah J., 
Thomas G., Benjamin S. and Henry C. His wife died, and 
Dec. 30, 1835, Mr. Noble married Rhoda Oliver, of Centre- 
ville, Ind., to whom were born six children — Arthelia, James, 
Mary C, Noah, William T. and George T. In early life Mr. 
Noble received but a limited education, but later he applied 
himself to study, and acquired a good understanding of all 
practical subjects. Soon after settling in Centreville he was 
appointed Collector of State and County Revenue, serving 
till Aug. 20, 1840, when he assumed the duties of Sheriff 
of Wayne County. He served as Sheriff two terms, re. 
tiring Aug. 19, 1844. The same month he was elected 
Clerk of the Wayne Circuit Court, and served till 1852. He 
then retired to private life, having been in public office four- 
teen years. He settled on his farm, south of Centreville, 
where he died Feb, 23, 1858, and his widow now resides in 
Richmond. He was a faithful member of the Masonic frater- 
nity, and also of the Odd Fellows order. He was nearly six 
feet tall, full chested, and of tine appearance. The eldest of 
his children was Adjutant-General during the late war, and 
subsequently Clerk of the Supreme Court of Indiana. He 
died Oct. 18, 1879. The second is the wife of J. H. Oheever, 
a banker in New York City. The third is unmarried. Arthe- 
lia, the seventh child, is the wife of Thomas P. Vance, 
postal clerk, and a resident of Richmond. William T. is the 
eleventh and was born in Wayne County, Ind., Nov. 29, 1845. 
He received an academical education, and in 1866 was ap- 
pointed Deputy Clerk of the Supreme Court, having previ- 
ously served as clerk for bis brother Lazarus in the Adjutant- 
General's office. In 1880 he was elected Clerk of Wayne 



N*> 



r^.. 



^5>>""'*- - -"**»_i^ 




S^'^ 







CITY OF RICHMOND. 217 

Circuit Court, still holding the position. He has been a 
member of the I. O. O. F. since 1868, and of the F. & A. M. 
since 1872, having taken thirty-two degrees in the latter 
order. In 1880 he joined the Knights Templar, and is now 
Generalissimo of the order. He was married Dec. 23, 1868, 
toJS'ora, daughter of Hon. William A. Peelle. They have 
one son — Robert Peelle. 

t/. J^. Noland is a native of Piqua, Ohio, a son ot James 
JSToland, still a resident of Piqna. He is a grandson of Will- 
lam and great-grandson of Damas l^oland, a native of Vir- 
ginia, of English descent. In the tall of 1861 he enlisted in 
Company I, Seventy-first Ohio Infantry, and served till Janu- 
ary, 1866, participating in the battles of Shiloh, Atlanta 
campaign, Nashville and Franklin. In 1870 he was employed 
as brakeman on the Pan-Handle Railroad, from Indianapolis 
to Bradford. In June,^1872, he was promoted to freight con- 
ductor, and in July, 1874, was tranferred to the Columbus, 
Ohio, yards as yard master, serving till Dec. 1, 1875, when he 
was given the same position in the Indianapolis yards. In 
September, 1880, he was again appointed freight conductor, 
and in September, 1881, was appointed, yard master of the 
First and Third Divisions of the Chicago, St. Louis & Pitts- 
burg, Little Miami Division of the Pittsburg, Cincinnati & 
St. Louis, and the Grand Rapids & Indiana railroads, Rich- 
mond, Ind. • 

Edioin De Forrest Palmer^ Postmaster, Richmond, Ind., 
son of Clarendon R. and Nancy A. Palmer, was born Jan. 
3, 1833, in Utica, K. T. When he was a child, his parents 
removed to Galesburg, 111., where lie was reared and educated, 
completing his education in Knox College. In 1853 he be- 
gan working on the railroad at Peoria, 111., and for nineteen 
years was an engineer on different roads. In 1872 he began 
the manufacture of malleable iron in Richmond, but sus- 
pended business in 1875. He served five years as Council- 
man of Richmond, and in 1875 was elected on the Republican 
ticket Street Commissioner, and re-elected six consecutive 
years. Mr. Palmer is a member of Sr. Paul's Episcopal 
Church. He is a member of the Masonic fraternity, and in 
1873 was chosen Grand Commander of Knights Templar for 
15 



218 HISTOKY OF WAYNE COUNTY. 

the State of Indiana, and is now Past Grand, makinij; him 
a member of the Grand Encampment of the United States. 
May 15, 1S82, he was appointed Postmaster at liichmond. 
He was married at Kickapoo, Peoria Co., Ilh, April 16, 1854, 
to Ellen J., dauo;hter of Captain Lewis Coob-idge. Tliey have 
three children — Frank D., Harry E. and Jesse S. 

J. W. Parry^ conductor on the Grand Rapids & Indiana 
Railroad, is the eldest son of William Parry. He was born 
in Richmond in 1840, and acquired a common-school educa- 
tion. He was reared on a farm from 1844 till he sjrew to 
maturity. In 1862 he was married to Hannah J., daughter 
of Reuben H. Ivins. They have four children living — Mary 
A., William S., John E. and Laura E. In 1864 Mr. Parry 
abandoned farming, after which he dealt in ice for several 
years, and in 1869 was succeeded by Brannon <Sz Hawkins. 
In the fall of 1870 he became emplo3;ed on the Grand Rapids 
& Indiana Railroad, on which he has been almost ever since. 
Beginning as a brakeman, he has worked himself up to the 
position he nowfills,and during his entire service on this road 
has never met with an accident. 

William P«r>"y, President of the Cincinnati, Richmond & 
Fort Wayne Railroad, Richmond, Ind., was born July 20, 
1810, in Montgomery County, Pa., a son of Joseph and Sarah 
(Webster) Parry, both natives of Montgomery County, Pa., 
his "father born Dec. 1, 1788, and his mother Jan. 27, 1789. 
His father died Sept. 1, 1870, and his mother April 5, 1861. 
Of a family of eight children six are living and three are res- 
idents of Wayne County. He came to Wayne County with 
his parents in 1827. and worked at the plasterer's trade till 
1844, when he took ctiarge of his father's farm, thus releasing 
his parents from active labor. He conducted the farm suc- 
cessfully, and in 1850 purchased it. His ability has placed him 
in many positions ot honor and trust. He has repeatedly 
served on the City Council. In 1849 and 1851 he constructed 
the turnpike from Richmond to Williamsburg, and has since 
served as its .President. He was President of the Wayne 
County Turnpike Company from 1858 till 1871, when he was 
compelled to resign on account of railroad and other busi- 
ness. Since 1868 he has served as President of the Cincin- 



CITY OF EICHMOND. 219 

nati, Richmond & Fort Wayne Railroad. He has served as 
Township Trustee nineteen consecutive years. He was mar- 
ried in 1833 to Mary, daughter of Robert Hill. She was born 
in Wayne County, Ind., in 1813. They have had a family of 
twelve children, seven of whom are livins;. 

Hon. Stanton J. Peelle, the present Congressman from the 
Seventh District, was born in New Garden Township, Wayne 
County, Feb. 11, 1813. He resided on the farm of his father 
John C. Peelle, in Wayne County, until 1859, when the fam- 
ily removed to Randolph County, and in 1860 located in Win- 
chester. He received a fair common-school education, and 
taught school for a short time. In 1861 he enlisted in Com- 
pany G, Eighth Indiana Regiment; in 1862 was transferred and 
made Second Lieutenant ot" Company K, Fifty-seventh Regi- 
ment; mustered out J uly 30, 1863. He then began reading law 
in the office of Hon. Wm. A. Peelle, in Centreville, butinFeb- 
ruary, 1864, again entered the service and remained until the 
close of the war. He resumed the study of law and was ad- 
mitted to the bar in Winchester in 1866. He removed to 
Indianapolis in 1869. In 1876 lie was elected by the Repub- 
licans of Marion County as Representative to Legislature. lu 
the fall of 1880 he was elected to Congress from the Seventh 
Congressional District. 

John E. Pehz., merchant tailor,901 Main street, Richmond, 
Ind., is a native of Suffolk County, ]^s^. Y. He learned his 
trade in New York City. He came West in 1875 and located 
in Richmond, commencing business in the Yaughn Block, 
and removing to his present location in 1881. He employs 
about twenty men who are practical and hrst-class workmen. 
He superintends the cutting, having made a specialty of that 
branch for fourteen years. He was married in 1882 to Anna 
M. Knollenberg, of Richmond. 

J. H. Philhroohs, proprietor of the Huntington and Grand 
hotels, Richmond, Ind. The Huntington House was orig- 
inally opened by Oren Huntington about 1850. He was the 
owner without change till his death, and the hotel was con- 
ducted by him till 1879, when it was leased by R. F. Jones, 
and was thoroughly renovated and refurnished throughout, 
and from that time till the present has been one of the best 



220 HISTOKY OF WAYNE COUNTY. 

hotels in the State. It is located on the southeast corner of 
Main and Seventh streets, directly in the center of the 
thickest business portion of the city. The building is 
a fonr-story brick, fronting 100 feet on Main and running 
back to the alley on Seventh street, a distance of 140 feet. It 
contains sixty-four rooms, fifty of which are well-furnished 
sleeping apartments. There are ten sample-rooms for com- 
mercial travelers, a baggage elevator, a ladies' parlor on the 
office floor and a gentlemen's sitting-room separate from the 
office. The dining-room is 40 x 50 feet in size, and can com- 
fortably seat 100 people. Mr. Philbrooks became proprietor 
of this house and later he purchased the Grand Hotel, ten 
doors from the Huntington, which is used as sleeping apart- 
ments, the meals being served at the Huntington. He runs 
the house in first-class style in every respect, and is well de- 
serving a liberal patronage. 

Ahram Phillips was born in Montgomery County, Pa., in 
1820, a son of Abram Phillips, Sr., who was born in Pennsyl- 
vania, and resided in that State till his death. Our subject 
leaimed cabinet-making in his native State, and in 1836 
located at Macomb, 111., but not liking the country he moved 
to Madison, Ind. In 1838 he came to Richmond, where he 
has since resided, and where he followed his trade about 
thirty years. On attaining his majority his father gave him 
$250, and by industry and good business principles he has 
accumulated a large amount of property. In the last decade, 
when the completion of the present court-house depended 
upon personal aid, he donated $700 for its erection. In 1853 
he with James M. Starr erected the Phillips Opera House, of 
which Mr. Phillips is proprietor. He also owns the Phillips 
Hotel, and much more real estate. H6 resides with his sister 
in West Richmond. 

J. H. Preston^ agent for the Western Assurance Company, 
of Toronto, Can., Wescott Block, ISTo. 715 Main street, Rich- 
mond, Ind., is a native of Union County, Ind. He was reared 
on a farm, but received a collegiate education, graduating 
from Knox College, Galesburg, 111., in 1852. From 1855 till 
1864 he was local agent for several insurance companies, and 
in the latter year took the general agency of the Continental 



CITY OF RICHMOND. 



221 



Company, of New York, having the charge of the State of 
Indiana and nearly all of Illinois. In 1878 he relinquished 
the agency of the Continental and became connected with the 
Western Assurance Company of Toronto, Canada. This com- 
pany has a capital of $2,000,000. Since his connection with 
these companies Mr. Preston has paid out over $1,000,000 in 
losses. He has 200 local agents under his supervision and 
tlie business is steadily increasing. 

Cornelius Batlif. —Thi& venerable pioneer was born in 
Randolph County, N. C, Dec. 25, 1798, and was the son of 
Cornelius and Elizabeth (Charles) Ratliff. His great-grand- 
lather came from England with William Penn and was pres- 
ent when the latter made his famous treaty with the Indians. 
The parents of the subject of this sketch removed to Indiana 
Territory in 1810, and settled a mile northwest of Richmond. 
Here they lived, among the Indians, but were not molested 
by them on account of their principles, though all other fam- 
ilies in the neighborhood were obliged to remove daring the 
trouble between the Shawnees and Pottawatomies. Cornelius 
inherited the home farm and still lives upon it. He was mar- 
ried June 12, 1822, to Mary Kindley, of Warren County, Ohio, 
a o-rand-daughter of John Rudolph Waymire, who came trom 
the kingdom of Hanover (where he had been one ot the 
king's bodv-guard) to Pennsylvania prior to the American 
Revolution. Mary Ratlifl was a true type of pioneer woman- 
hood, and nobly assisted her husband in all his undertakings 
Few men in Eastern Indiana have done more to develop and 
improve the country than Cornelias Ratliff. He has ever been 
liberal in assisting every worthy undertaking. He began the 
nursery business in 1822 and continued it for more than thirty 
years, furnishing trees to various parts of Indiana and neigh- 
boring States. He has always followed farming and has been 
very successful. In politics he was formerly a Whig and is 
now a Republican. He was strongly opposed to slavery and 
was among the early Abolitionists. He has been a life-long 
member of the Society of Friends, and is one ot the most 
devoted and consistent adherents of that taith, always active 
in religious work. His life has been peaceful, blameless and 
useful, and he ishonored an i esteemed by his fellow-citizens 

generally. 



222 HISTORY OF WAYNE COUNTY. 

Hon. Joseph C. Eatliff, Richmond, Ind., a son of Corne- 
lius and Mary Ratliff, was born near Richmond, July 6, 1827. 
His early education was obtained in the common schools of 
Wayne Coimty during the short winter terras, the summers 
being devoted to farm labor. Later in his minor life he en- 
tered the Richmond A.cademy. Subsequently he taught 
school several terms, then in 1850 took up the study of den- 
tistry, and in connection took a full course of medical lectures 
at the Western Reserve College. After practicing dentistry 
one year he engaged for the same time, near Richmond, in 
manufacturing paper; then resumed farming, in which he is 
still engaged. In 1865 he was elected Justice of the Peace, 
and since he has gradually been elected to higher offices of 
honor and trust until 1875, when he was chosen by the peo- 
ple of Wayne County as a Representative to the State Legislat- 
ure, and while serving in that body he served on the 
Committees on Education and the Sinking Fund. Not only 
did he display an interest in education while in the State As - 
sembly, but his interest increased with his age, and he has 
since filled some very important positic^ns in the educational 
history of the State, none of which are more worthy of note 
than the one he now occupies. President of the Board of 
Trustees of the Purdue University, As an agriculturist and 
horticulturist he has always displayed a special interest, and 
is deserving of considerable credit, as is seen in the chapter 
devoted to horticulture. He has been an able contributor to 
publications devoted to agriculture, and from 1860 to 1866 
edited the agricultural department of the Richmond Tele- 
gram- Politically he is an earnest Republican; religiously, a 
Friend, in which society he has a birthright and is an earnest 
worker. He is imbued with all that goes to make up a strong 
temperance man. He has been a member of Freemasonry 
for many years, and has been Master of Centreville Lodge. 
He also belongs to the I. O. O. F., and in 1856 held the of- 
fice of Noble Grand, and the following year represented his 
Lodge in the Grand Lodge of the State. He is a man deeply 
interested in the sciences, and antiquity especially, having 
given considerable time to their study and the collection of a 
fair cabinet. He was married Oct. 19, 1852, to Mary F., 



CITY OF RICHMOND. 223 

daughter of Daniel B. Crawford, of Richmond. Of their six 
children four are living, three sons and one daughter. 

Daniel G. Reld, Teller in Second National Bank, Rich- 
mond, was born in the city of Richmond, Wayne Co., Ind., 
in 1858. He attended the common schools till he was fifteen 
years of age, when he became an assistant in the Second Na- 
tional Bank, where he has since been engaged. He was married 
Oct. 13, 1880, to Miss Ella C. Dnnn, of this city. 

Daniel Reld, deceased, was a son of Daniel Reid, Sr., who 
was of Scotch-Irish extraction, a native of Virginia, where he 
matured, lived and died. His wife was Margaret Patterson, 
of Lancaster County, Pa., but died in Richmond, Ind.. at an 
advanced age. Onr subject now in question was born in 
Rockbridge Countv, Va., Feb. 5, 1799, and was one of a large 
family, most of whom settled near New Paris, Preble Co., 
Ohio, where Daniel settled in 1821. Having acquired a fair 
education in his minor life and together with his natural 
ability he commenced teaching school in the pioneer days ot 
Preble County, Ohio. In the fall of 1823 he removed to 
Richmond, Ind., and became clerk in the store of James Mc- 
Guire, and later filled the same position in the store of Robert 
Morrisson. Having had several years' experience and ac- 
quired some means, in 1828 he associated himself in business 
with Joseph P. Strattan and for ten years was a pioneer mer- 
chant in Richmond. One year after associating with Strattan 
he was appointed Postmaster of Richmond, which position 
he filled in connection with his store, until his appoint- 
ment in 1838, by President Van Buren, as Register of the 
Land-oflice at Fort Wayne, Ind., which position he filled with 
credit and honor, but about 1843 he settled on a farm in 
Allen County, Ind., and in 1855 returned to Richmond, where 
he engaged in the grocery business with his son, William S., 
and N. S. Leeds, until the firm changed to Reid &, Yanne- 
mau, where he was employed, and while thus engaged moved 
to his farm one and a half miles west of town, and up to the 
time of his death was living on his farm, but in the employ 
of Reid & Beeler. His death occurred March 3, 1873. He 
died as he had lived — happy, having been for many years a 
member of and Ruling Elder in the United Presbyterian 



224 HISTORY OF AVAYNE COUNTY'. 

church at Richmond. He was twice married ; first, to Letitia, 
daughter of William Scott, who was born in the North of Ire- 
laud and came to America when sixteen years old, and died 
in Allen County, Ind., in 1854. Tiiis union had born to them 
seven children — William Scott, of whom further notice is 
ijjiven; Mary Ann. who died in infancy; Mary Ann, wife of 
Franklin P.Randall, an attorney of Fort Wayne; James P.; 
Mari^aret, unmarried and died February, 1883; Hannah M,, 
who died in 1833, and Robert Morrisson, who emigrated to 
California in 1852. Our subject, Daniel, married for his sec- 
ond wife, in October, 1854, Mrs. Ann Dougan, then living in 
Niles, Mich., and a daughter of Isaac Grray, an earl}' pioneer 
merchant of Richmond. This union had born to them two 
children — Daniel Gray," now of the Second National Bank of 
Richmond, and Emma Virginia, wife of Oliver Bogue, both 
graduates of Earlham College and now residents of Wabash, 
Ind., where he is practicing law. William Scott, the elder of 
the above family, was born in Rockbridge County, Ya., Dec. 
10, 1818, and was brought by his parents to Preble County, 
Ohio, when three years old. When five years old his father 
settled in the village of Richmond, where he matured and 
acquired a fair education. For a time he was clerk in his 
father's Land-office at Fort Wayne, Ind., during which time. 
May 7. 1839, he married Sarah Jane Mansur, by whom he 
had nine children, of whom two, the fifth and ninth, only, 
are now living. William S., subsequent to his marriage, 
devoted twelve years on a farm in Allen County, thence re- 
turned to Richmond and was for three years in the dry- 
goods business; then in the grocery and grain trade for 
many years; subsequently he became one of the prime mov- 
ers in the establishment of the pork-packing business in 
Richmond, as is elsewhere seen, in which he is still en- 
gaged. He, as was his father before him, is a member of and 
Ruling Elder in the United Presbyterian church of Richmond, 
and of him most of the history of that church was obtained. 
Mr. Reid lias been well and favorably known as a business 
man of honor and integrity for many years. He is willing 
to assist in all enterprises tending to elevate mankind and the 
upbuilding of society. 



City of Richmond. 225 

F. W. Hohinson, manufacturer, Richmond, Ind., is a 
native of Baltimore, Md., born in 1810. His parents, John 
and Mary A. (Wills) Robinson, were natives of Delaware, his 
father of English and his mother of Swiss descent. His 
mother died in Philadelphia, and his father in England. Of 
their seven children our subject is the eldest now living. 
His boyhood days were spent with his father, who was a 
carpenter. In 1829 he went to Darke County, Ohio, and in 
1834 came to Richmond, where he has since resided. 

Jonafha?ijRohe7'ts, youngest son of Thomas and Ann (Whit- 
son) Roberts, was born near West Elkton, Preble Co., Ohio, 
May 30, 1808. His father was born in Bucks County, Pa., 
Jan. 8, 1759, a son of Walter Roberts, who was of Welsh de- 
scent. After attaining his majority Thomas Roberts set- 
tled in South Carolina, where he married Ann Whitson. In 
1806 they removed to Preble County, Ohio. The same year 
he came to Richmond and entered a quarter-sectioii of wild 
Government land, and in March, 1811, with his wife and 
seven children, moved on it, one daughter having married 
previous to that date. Soon after entering the land, in 1806, 
he erected a rnde cabin on the present corner of Thir- 
teenth and South A streets, and cleared awa}' a few forest 
trees, and cleared a small patch where the house of Marcus 
Motes now stands, fenced it with brush and planted it with 
turnips. In 1812 Thomas Roberts built a hewed-log house 
on the lot which is now used by his son, Jonathan Roberts, 
as a stable. He died Sept. 25, 1840, and his wife Oct. 28, 
1840. They were members of the Society of Friends. 
They had a family of eight children — Rebecca, wife of 
Nathan Hawkins, both deceased; Walter, died at Dover, 
Wayne Co., Ind.; David, died in Richmond; Phoebe, wife of 
Henry Hawkins, both deceased; Sarah, wife of William 
Whitacre, now deceased; Thomas, Jr., deceased; Solomon W., 
deceased, and Jonathan, our subject. He was but three years of 
age when his parents came to Indiana, and thus his boyhood 
days were spent and his education received in this county. He 
has by observation and application acquired a good fund of 
general information. He was married Jan. 28, 1831, to 
Mary, daughter of J airus and Aves Smith. They have had 



226 HISTORY OF WAYNE COUNTY. 

four children — Aves, wife of W. S. Elliott, of Howard 
County, Ind.; Eli; Elvira, deceased, wife of Josiah Philips; 
Henrj S., of Wayne Township. Mrs. Roberts was born in 
Clinton County, K Y., March 26, 1810. The family are 
ijjerabers of the Society of Friends. 

E. F. Rosa, manufacturer of mineral water, and general 
dealer in ale, beer and cider, is a native of Germany, a son 
of Henry William and Anna M. (Klute) Rosa, natives of 
Hanover, Germany, his father born in 1812, and his mother 
in 1807. They were married in 1834, and in 1837 came to 
the United States, locating in Richmond in November, where 
the mother died in 1879, and the father in January, 1883. 
Of a family of seven children four are still living. E. F. is the 
second, the eldest dying in Germany. The first twelve years 
of his residence in America, H. W. Rosa worked at stone- 
cutting, milling and clerking. In 1849 he began the manu- 
facture of mineral water in a small way, and subsequently 
added other branches to the business till his trade increased 
from $600 to many times that amount annually. In 1855 he 
removed to the two-story brick building, 83 x 46 feet, 433 to 
439 South Front street. E. F. was for many years in com- 
pany with his father and since the latter's death has been 
sole proprietor. Politically he is a Democrat. He has served 
twelve years as Councilman of the First Ward, and nine years 
on the Board of Public Works. Oct. 14, 1858, he was mar- 
ried to Catherine E. D. Koehring, a native of Hanover, Ger- 
many, but a resident ot Richmond since 1854. Thirteen 
children have been born to tliem, but nine now living. Mr. 
and Mrs. Rosa and their family are all members of the Lu- 
theran church. 

Philip Schneider, proprietor of the City Carriage Shops, 
is a native of Germany, but came to Cincinnati, Ohio, when 
seven years of age. He has resided in Richmond, Ind., since 
1861, and carried on house, sign, carriage and fancy painting 
till 1875, when he succeeded S. R. Lippincott in his present 
business. He has the largest trade in the city and em- 
ploys about twenty hands, seven of them being among the 
best painters in the State. He is himself a practical painter 
having learned the trade in Cincinnati. He makes all 



CITY OF RICHMOND. 227 

kinds of carriages, buggies, gigs and sleighs and all his work 
is first-class. He is always willing to show his work, and 
has received some valuable premiums. The business was es- 
tablished about 1840, by Clayton Hunt, who erected most of 
the buildings. Mr. Schneider was first married to Rhoda 
Nordyke; his second wife was Susan Woohurst, and his 
present wife was Catherine Miller. He has a family cf five 
children, all living. He joined the Eed Men a number of 
years ago, and has been Treasurer the entire time. He has 
also belonged to the I. O. O. F. fraternity since 1862. 

Jolin G. Schwegmaii, ice dealer, Richmond, Ind., was born 
in Cincinnati, Ohio, March 25, 1844, a son of Christian and 
Mary Ann (Yosgroene) Schwegmau, natives of Hanover, 
Germany, who came to the United States when young people, 
and settled in Cincinnati, where they were married, and in 
1847 removed to Richmond, Ind., where the father died in 
1849 and the mother still lives. They were members of the 
Catholic church. Our subject is the second of five sous. 
He was reared and educated in Richmond. In 1867 he 
formed a partnership with William Courthouse and organized 
the People's Ice Company. Previous to that time this busi- 
ness had been carried on by diflferent parties on a very small 
scale, but they erected their houses and made improvements 
from time to time, till they now have a capacity for storing 
6,000 tons. In August, 1869, their buildings were burned, 
but they immediately erected new ones and enlarged their 
ice ponds. Thej' have all the modern implements in their 
line, and have an annual trade of $5,000, running three regu- 
lar wagons in the summer. Politically Mr. Schwegman is a 
Democrat. He has served six years as Councilman in the 
First Ward. He was married Nov. 7, 1871, to Mary 
Johannes, a native of Cincinnati. Ohio, but a resident of 
Richmond. They have a family of six children. They are 
members of the Catholic church. 

Andrew F. Scott, President of the Second National Bank, 
Richmond, Ind., was born in Rockbridge County, Va., Dec. 
28, 1811. He acquired a fair education in his native State, 
and when twenty-two years of age came to Wayne County, 
Ind., and engaged a school a short distance from Richmond. 



228 HISTORY OF WAYNE COUNTY. 

"While teaching: this school he arranged to enter the store ot 
Daniel Reid, who was also Postmaster. He remained there 
as clerk several years, and in 1839, after the appointment of 
Mr. Reid as Register of the United States Land-office, at Ft. 
Wayne, he served as clerk there a year, and afterward served 
a year under James W. Borden, as Receiver. In 1841 he re- 
turned to Richmond, and became Deputy under Sheriff 
William Baker. He subsequently was clerk for Jesse Meek, 
and still later was clerk for an Ohio River steamboat com- 
pany till 184-7. In the latter year he returned to Richmond, 
and for several years carried on a successful mercantile busi- 
ness. Although belonging to the political party in the mi- 
nority in Wayne County, in 1851 he was elected Clerk of the 
county, and re-elected in 1855, his term expiring in March, 
1860. During that time he resided in Centreville. He sub- 
sequently followed farming, merchandizing and building sev- 
eral years, in the meantime erecting the Second National 
Bank building block. In 1867 he became a member of the 
wholesale grocery firm of Forkner, Scott & Elmer, remaining 
with it ten years. At the organization of the Second Na- 
tional Bank, in 1872, he was one of the prime movers and 
a stockholder, and has been its President from the date of or- 
ganization. He is one ot the leading members of the United 
Presbyterian church of Richmond. He married Martha 
McGlathery, of Philadelphia, in 1839. His children are — 
Letitia A., John, Augustus C, and Mary E. 

John Sedgwick was born in Union County, Ind., Aug. 18, 
1819, a son of Richard and Sarah (Hunt) Sedgwick, his father 
a native of England, born in 1764, andhis mother a native of 
North Carolina. His father came to America in 1794 and lo- 
cated in Dearborn, now Union, County, Ind. He was in the 
war of 1812. He cleared up a farm a mile and a half from 
Boston, but died at his son-in-law's in Ohio, in 1849. His 
wife died in 1844. Of their six children — Charles, Francina, 
Agnes, Mary, John and Martha — all are living save Mary. 
Our subject has made farming a study, and has accumulated 
a good property. He owns a fine farm of 150 acres in Boston 
Township, and another of 230 acres in Randolph County, 
Ind. In 1881 he retired from farm life and removed to 



CITY OF RICHMOND 229 

Richmond, where he has a good home. He has an ingenious 
mind and has invented a wire stretcher which is unquestioned 
in the facilities claimed for it. He was married to Margaret, 
daughter of Jacob Smelser, of Wayne County, Ind., but a 
native of Kentucky. They have three children — Isham, 
Richard and Anna, all of whom are connected with the 
Sedgwick Wire Fence Company. Mr. and Mrs. Sedgwick 
are members of the Universalist church, 

Edward Shaw was born in Cincinnati, Ohio, April 29, 
1815, a son of John and Elizabeth (Wright) Shaw, natives of 
Pennsylvania, of English and Scotch descent. His father 
died in Greene County, Ohio, in 1851, and his mother in 
1857. His mother was educated at West-town Boarding 
School, near Philadelphia, Pa., and was subsequently one of 
the best teachers in Ohio. His father enlisted in the war of 
1812, as nurse and assistant surgeon. At the close of the war 
he returned to Cincinnati, intending to make it his future 
home. At that time there were but seven or eight families 
who were members of the Friend's Society in the place and 
they had no meeting house, holding their meetings at mem- 
bers' houses. Being a birthright member, Mr. Shaw wished 
to be married according to the order of the society, and 
wrote a subscription paper, circulated it among Friends and 
raised $500, and with it bought of Nicholas Longworth 
nearly two acres of ground with a one-story log-house on it, 
on the corner of John and Fifth streets, which was repaired 
and used as a meeting house for fifty years, when their pres- 
ent two-story brick meeting-house was built. Mr. and Mrs. 
John Shaw were the first couple married in this house in 
1814r. Edward Shaw was reared on a farm and in early life 
learned the tanner's trade in Reading, Ohio. He has the 
copyright of Shaw's Railroad Liniment, a botanic prepara- 
tion which is a speedy cure for rheumatism, neuralgia, burns, 
bruises, headache, etc., and taken internally is a valuable 
remedy for neuralgia of the stomach, cholera morbus, etc. 
This liniment is gaining a wide reputation. Mr. Shaw was 
married Aug. 27, 184:0, to Peninnah, daughter of Robert 
Hill. She was born Feb. 23, 1817. They have had a family 
of eight children — Elizabeth, deceased ; Robert H. ; Rebecca, 



23(> HISTORY OF WAYNE COUNTY. 

deceased; Mary E., wife of Louis K. Harris; John, oi St. 
Louis, Mo.; Henry 0., William T., and Susan B. 

Jacob Shejfer is a son of Daniel ShefFer, and grandson of 
Daniel Sheffer, Sr. The latter was of German descent, but 
a native of Pennsylvania. In later life he removed to Wythe 
County, Va., and in 1812 came to Wayne County, Ind., and 
bought a quarter-section in Boston Township, and also entered 
a small farm just over the line in Ohio. He married Anna 
Hudlow, of Virginia. She died in 1832 and he in 1834. 
They had a family of ten children — Andrew, Jacob, Daniel, 
Michael, John, Sarah, Catherine, Elizabeth, Anna and Mar- 
garet. Sarah is the only one living, and resides in Whitley 
County, Ind. Daniel was born in Wythe County, Va., and 
in 1811 married Catharine Keesling, a native of Virginia, of 
German descent. Tliey came to Wayne County that same 
year, and he soon after took part in the Indian war. He 
entered a small tarm in Ohio, but lived on a part of his 
father's farm in Boston Township, a part of which he subse- 
quently inherited. He buried his wife a short time previous 
to the late war, and he died soon after. They had a family 
of eight children — Martin, deceased; Jacob; Ann, wife of 
ClarJc Gray, of Wabash County, Ind.; George, deceased; 
Mary, now Mrs. Eli Wilson, of Wabash County, Ind.; Sarah, 
wife of James Feasel, of Boston Township; Aima, wife of 
Leroy McWhinney, of Adair County, Iowa; John, residing 
on the old homestead in Boston Township. Our subject was 
born in Wayne County, Ind., April 22, 1814. He was reared 
a farmer, and assisted his father in clearing his farm. In 
1877 he moved to Richmond, and now has a handsome resi- 
dence at 110 North Seventh street. He bought his first land 
in 1843, and added to it till he owned nearly 1,000 acres. 
He now has but 412 acres, having given the rest to his chil- 
dren. Politically he is a Republican. He has never been 
an aspirant for office, but has served his township as Trustee. 
He was married when twenty-three years of age to Mary 
Stanley. Tiiey have had a family of seven children — John 
M., Catharine (wife of Joseph Bosworth), James M., Daniel 
W., Clayton, Cynthia (wife of John W. Miller), and Mary, 
wife of Charles Wolfer, all save one living in Boston Town- 



CITY OF KICHMOND. 231 

ship. Mrs. Shetfer was born in Union County, Ind., in 1817, 
a daughter of ZachariaH and Mary (Bed well) Stanley, natives 
of North Carolina. They removed to Union County, Ind., 
where Mrs. Stanley died in 1851, and Mr. Stanley in 1852. 
They had a family of thirteen children. Six daughters and 
three sons are living, two in Wayne County — Mrs. Sheffer , 
and Sarah, widow oi John Bennett. 

George Shurman is a native of Hanover, Germany, where 
he grew to manhood. He learned the cabinet-maker's trade, 
and in 1859 came to America, locating in Cincinnati, Ohio, 
and in June, 1862, he came to Richmond, where he worked 
at his trade together with carpentering till 1867. He then 
bought an interest in the CoffinWorks which were incorporated 
in 1870, the firm name being J. M. Hutton & Co., since 
which Mr. Shurman has been a director and stockholder, 
serving as foreman of the works. He is a member of St. 
Paul's Evangelical Lutheran Church, and has served one 
term as Trustee. 

Robert C. Shute was born in Gloucester County, N. J., 
Oct. 5, 1816, a son of Samuel, Sr., and Sybil (Cook) Shute. 
He began the practice of his profession (surveying and civil 
engineering) in 1837,, and the same year assisted in survey- 
ing the Miciiigan South'ern & Northern Indiana Raih-oad 
from Toledo, Ohio, to Ottawa, 111. In 1850 he surveyed the 
Indiana Central, now the Pan-Handle, from Richmond to 
Indianapolis. In 1840 he surveyed the Dayton & Western 
Turnpike, and worked on that road till it was finished to 
Charlottesville, Ind. In 1844 he surveyed the Richmond, 
Boston & Fair Haven Turnpike — the first turnpike run- 
ning into Richmond. He surveyed the most of the turnpikes 
leading to Richmond, and lajd out nearly all the city part 
of the sub-divisions east of Ninth street. He was ap- 
pointed County Surveyor in 1856, and held the office by 
re-election till 1868, when he resigned and removed to Mis- 
souri. He returned to Richmond in 1869, and now resides 
in comfortable circumstances on Linden Hill, adjoining city of 
Richmond. In 1873 was again elected County Surveyor, and 
held the office eight years. He has been Civil Engineer ot 
the city of Richmond twenty years, from 1849. Mr. Shute 



232 HISTORY OF WAYNE COUNTY. 

was married in 1839 to Mary C. Clark, of Philadelphia, Pa.. 
who died in 1877, leaving ten children. In 1878 he married 
Ovanda J., widow of Rev. C. W. Miller, and dauo^hter of 
Isaac Lamb. They are members of the Methodist Episcopal 
church, 

Samuel Shute was born in Gloucester County, N. J., July 
13, 1808, the fifth of thirteen children of Samuel Shute, Sr. 
The latter was born in Gloucester County, N. J., in 1773. 
He married Rebecca Zanes, who died leaving one child, 
Nancy, who married Edward Ferst, an early merchant of 
Richmond. He subsequently married Alice Zanes, a sister 
of his former wite. She died in J^ew Jersey, leaving six 
children — James P., Harriet, Charles, Aaron, Samuel and 
Hiram. Mr. Shute afterward married Sybil, daughter of 
Robert and Lvdia Cook, of Gloucester County, N. J. They 
had six children — Robert C, Lydia (wife of J. L. Morrisson), 
Amos, Elizabeth, Edward F. and Elias H. Mrs. Shute died 
in Cincinnati, Ohio, Feb. 17, .1847, and Mr. Shute in Coving- 
ton, Ky., Feb. 9, 1857. They came West in 1818 and bought 
a farm five miles southeast of Richmond, residing there till 
1831, when the}^ removed to Richmond, and in 1833 bought 
150 acres of land of Joshua Alberson at $15 an acre. One- 
half the land is now in the city limits of Richmond, and the 
rest is at Linden Hill, and is valued at $2,000 or $3,000 per 
acre. He sold the land in 1845 for $60 an acre, and removed 
to Cincinnati. When a young man he was prominent in the 
judicial Courts of New Jersey. Our subject was ten years 
of age when his father came lo Indiana. He was reared on 
a farm, and his early advantages for an education were 
limited. His calling through life was that of agriculture, in 
which calling his neighbors s,ay he made great proficiency, 
having kept, according to their testimony, one of the model 
farms of Wayne County. He retired to private life on Lin- 
den Hill in 1876 to spend his days in comparative ease. 
He was married in 1837 to Deborah S., daughter of Levi 
Keerans, who settled in Richmond in 1835. She was born 
Sept. 6, 1817. They have a family of eight children, seven 
sons and one daughter. They are members of the society 
of Hicksite Friends. 



CITY OF KICHMOND. 233 

John p. Smith was born Oct. 5, 1817, in Bourbon County, 
Ky., a son of Peter and grandson of Nicholas Smith, who 
was born in Germany, and when a young man he emigrated 
to America and settled in Frederickstown, Md. He moved 
to Bourbon County, Ky., where he followed farming till his 
death, and where his wife also died. Their children were — 
Joseph, Peter, Jacob and Elizabeth. Nicholas Smith served 
in the Indian war of 1795. Peter Smith, father of John P., 
was born in Maryland, and moved to Kentucky with his 
parents in 1800. He soon after married Margaret, daughter 
of Peter Smelser, who was born in Germany. They were 
the parents of ten children — Nicholas, who followed farming 
in Abington Township, Wayne County, till his death; Mary, 
wife of David Railsback, of Wayne Township, Wayne 
County; Barbara, deceased, wife of C. C. Beeler, who is in 
partnership with our subject in pork-packing; John P.; 
George, farming part of the homestead in Abington Town- 
ship; Martha J., deceased; James, farming in Union County, 
Ind.; Irvin, deceased; Joseph W., an extensive lumber-dealer 
in Tennessee; Margaret, deceased, wife of Nelson Crow. In 
1818 Peter Smith removed with his famil}'^ to Wayne County, 
Ind., and entered a half section of land in Abington Town- 
ship, which he cleared and improved, and resided there till 
his death. Although he voted for Andrew Jackson, his sub- 
sequent affiliations were with the Pepublican party. John P. 
Smith, whose name heads this sketch, has resided in Wayne 
County since he was two years old, and since 1855 has lived 
on his present farm. He was reared to farm life and has al- 
ways followed agricultural pursuits, and since 1861 he has 
also carried on pork-packing in Richmond. He married Mary 
Sedgwick, who was born in Union County, Ind., and died 
near Richmond in 18 — . She was a daughter of Richard 
Sedgwick. They had seven children — Martha J., Anna, 
Richard, Peter, Belle, Maggie, and Clara (deceased). 

James W. Smith is a native of Richmond, Ind., born in 
1839. He is the eldest and the only one now living of five 
children of Sidney and Martha (Wharry) Smith. His grand- 
father, John F. Smith, was a native of Virginia, of German 
descent. His mother was a daughter of James Wharry, of 
16 



234 HISTORY OF WAYNE COUNTY. 

Columbus, Ohio, and a sister of the late Judge Wharrj, ot 
Darke Comity, Ohio. His father came to Indiana in 1834 
and died in 1865. His mother is still living. James "W. 
received a common-school education, always residing in Rich- 
mond. In 1857 he went into the old bank of Morrisson, 
Blanchard & Co. (now Richmond National Bank) and re- 
mained there twenty-two years, and the last seventeen years 
was the general bookkeeper. The first eight years of the 
latter's existence he was one of its directors. In 1882 he was 
elected by the voters of both political parties by a majority 
of 1,200 to the office of Trustee of Wayne Township, a posi- 
tion he still holds. 

Stace (& Crocker^ granite and marble dealers, No. 16 North 
Ninth street, Richmond, Ind. This business was established 
in 1867 by Peter Ritter, at 15 North Fifth street, and in 1870 
the firm became Ritter & Yickrey. Mr. Vickrey died in 
1877, and Mr. Ritter continued the business alone till 1879, 
when N. E. Warder became associated with him. In Janu- 
ary, 1882, Geering Stace succeeded Mr. Ritter, forming the 
firm of Warder & Stace, and in May following they removed 
to 1121 Main street. They employ only practical workmen, 
Mr. Stace being a very fine carver. He is a native of Frank- 
lin, Warren Co., Ohio. He was reared in his native town, 
and learned his trade in Dayton, under Houghtelin & Stain- 
land. He worked as a journeyman some time, and in March, 
1870, came to Richmond, where he has since worked at his 
trade. He is a member of the I. 0.0. F. and Masonic fra- 
ternities, and has taken all the degrees of the Odd Fellows' 
lodge and encampment, and of the Patriarchal circle. O. P. 
Crocker, the junior member of the firm, purchased the inter- 
est of N. E. Warder in January, 1884. He is a native of 
Wayne County, and has always lived in his native county. 

y. H. Stafford^ miller, was born in Lancaster County, Pa,, 
in 1844, a son of Samuel and Maria (Jacobs) Stafford, natives 
of Pennsylvania, his father of Berks County, and his mother 
of Lancaster County. Our subject is the fifth of eleven chil- 
dren. He worked on the farm with his father till nineteen 
years of age, and then began to learn the trade of a miller. 
In the spring of 1866 he came to Wayne County, where he 



CITY OF RICHMOND. 235 

has since resided, with the exception of a year spent in Dub- 
lin. In 1874 he became a partner in the mill, and in 1879 
became sole proprietor. His mill burned in the spring of 
1883, and the following summer he erected a fine new brick 
mill with two run of burrs, at a cost of $6,000, and commenced 
operations in September, 1883. Mr. Stafford was married in 
April, 1871, to Emma W. Hill. They have three children. 
Mr. Stafford takes an active interest in all public affairs, both 
county and city. 

Charles West Starr was born in Philadelphia, Feb. 28, 1793. 
His parents were members of the Religions Society of 
Friends, and were also natives of the city of his birth. When 
of age and out of his apprenticeship (carpenter), he engaged 
in the coasting trade between Charleston, S. C, and Philadel- 
phia, and finally went into the lumber business in Charleston. 
Here, surrounded by slavery, he first learned to abhor it, and 
closing out his stock he invested part of his means in rice, 
put it on board a ship bound to Lisbon, Portugal, going 
along himself as a passenger; returned home the same year 
and projected his first trip to the then " far West." Leaving 
home on the 21st of September, 1818, he visited the States 
of Ohio, Indiana, Kentucky, Illinois and Missouri, traveling 
on horseback and alone the entire journey of five months. 
Kew Year's day found him at Richmond, Ind., and a guest 
of John Smith, the proprietor of the south half of the vil- 
lage. He thoroughly explored Wayne County, and marked it 
as his intended place of residence by entering a tract of land 
near Economy. Crossing the Susquehanna on Saturday, Feb. 
1, 1819, on his way home, he hitched his horse in front of a 
Quaker meeting then in session, and took his seat with the 
worshipers. At the close of the meeting he saw Elizabeth 
Wilson for the first time, who afterward became his wife. 
In the spring of 1825 he settled in Richmond, Ind., living on 
old Front street, nearly opposite the' court-house. The village 
then contained about 700 inhabitants, mostly Friends. There 
was not a rod of turnpike nor a bridge in the county or the 
State, much less a railroad. The center of town was the 
cross-roads, now Main and Fourth streets. In 1826 he bought 
of Jeremiah Cox the farm on which the north half of the 



236 HISTORY OF WAYNE COUNTY. 

town was laid out, paying $25 an acre for it. It contained 
222 acres, and had on it a brick dwelling in which his widow 
now lives, corner of Korth Tenth and D streets. Log barns, 
cribs, pig-pens and worm fences surrounded the house. The 
farm o-ate was hung to an oak-tree that stood where the Pan 
Handle freight depot stands. The north end of the village 
was the junction of Korth Sixth and Front streets. Friend 
Cox's reason for wishing to sell out was that " the boys stole 
his apples so." Pie soon after laid out North Seventh street, 
and removed the farm gate to its junction with Fort Wayne 
avenue, or Front street. The lots (quarter of an acre each) 
were sold for $100 each, a great price in those days. The 
proceeds of the sale of lots he steadily invested in building 
houses and extending streets. In fact, his entire income was 
appropriated to the improvement of the town, believing, as 
he did, ''that Ilichmond was destined to become a prosperous 
city." In the fall of 1829 he was stricken with paralysis of 
the right side. After a year's confinement he was able to 
hobble about, and with undiminished energy he resumed the 
building of houses and store-rooms, many of which still re- 
main to show the old Philadelphian style of architecture in 
which he was educated. He took a warm interest in the con- 
struction of the Richmond & Brookville Canal, which enter- 
prise was commenced in 1837; was the Treasurer of the 
company. The hard times of 1840 put an end to the work, 
as well as the financial career of nearly every business man 
in the town. The followiDg seven years was a period of great 
stagnation of growth and consequent depreciation of real 
estate. The subject of this sketch came very near being 
ruined in the general crash, but his personal integrity and 
a little timely help from a wealthy brother in his native city 
enabled him to go through without a sacrifice of property. 
The times changed for the better, sales of property resumed, 
and he paid every debt, principal and interest, without abate- 
ment. The character of this good man deserves a chapter in 
the history of his adopted home. Although surrounded con- 
stantly with the cares of a very active life, he was a great 
reader of books — books that required thought. Standard 
poetry and moral philosophy were his favorites. Life with 



CITY OF RICHMOND. 237 

him was too short to waste over romance. This taste made 
him an enjoyable conversationalist, notwithstanding his de- 
fective hearing. Full of humor, yet never vulgar or obscene, 
a fine punster, rich in maxims, frank, generous and. outspoken, 
he was a citizen beloved and respected by all that knew him. 
He cared more for purity of purpose than for the opinions of 
men. He enjoyed being right because he admired the right. 
With him to be honest to his neighbor was to be honest to 
himself. This was his religio.n; he professed no other. Quick 
tempered to a fault, yet the storm passed over as quickly, 
and he was then ready to forgive. His devoted companion 
was a woman of strong character, a safe counselor in business 
affairs, a good wife, mother and neighbor. Seven of their ten 
children lived to be men and women. Richmond fulfilled 
his repeated prediction of prosperity, and the old farm-house, 
once a long walk in the country, had well nigh become sur- 
rounded by beautiful homes during his life-time. Factories 
hummed the live-long day; two railroads crossed his meadows 
and planted their depot within gunshot of his residence. In 
the spring of 1855 his health gave way. He died on the 1st 
of May in the sixty-third year of his age. The sublimity of 
his character was never more beautiful than when he closed 
his eyes in his last sleep. In his success he said he had " noth- 
ing to regret," and in his last moments he said he " saw a 
fine ship waiting for him." It was the end of a righteous 
man. 

George TF. Stigleman, photographer and patentee of the 
new retouched solar picture, 537 Main street. After having 
learned the art of photography Mr. Stigleman commenced 
business in this city about fourteen years ago. Many years 
of practical experience made him a first-class photographer 
and brought a large and lucrative business. In 1873 he began 
working on an apparatus designed for the preparation of 
photographic negatives, and on March 5, 1878, had it pat- 
ented, having filed his application on Feb. 16, 1877. This 
process is unquestionably the most valuable thing discovered 
for many years. An unlimited number of photographs may 
be printed from a negative prepared by this process, not one 
of which will need the* slightest retouching in India ink. Mr. 



238 HISTORY OF WAYNE COUNTY. 

Stio-leinan lias by his genius added no little to the art of pho- 
tography and is deserving of credit for the success of his 
invention. Quite a number of unprincipled photographers 
have infringed on this patent, but have failed to make public 
their so-called invention for fear of exposure. Stigleman's 
photograph parlors, at 537 Main street, are fitted up hand- 
somely and equal to any in this section of the State. Quite 
a number of excellent samples of work done by this new pro- 
cess are on exhibition here, some of which are almost life 
size; the collection is probably the finest on exhibition in the 
West. Mr. Stigleman is a native of Wayne County, learned 
his profession in this city, and has been a resident of Rich- 
mond many years. His house stands at the head of the art, 
with a trade in all parts of this State and Western Ohio. He 
married Caroline, daughter of Evan Bailey, now of Washing- 
ton, Clay Township, and granddaughter of Nathan Brazer, 

Stephen S. Strattan, carriage manufacturer, Richmond, 
Ind., was born in Richmond, April 14, 1831, the second son 
of Ziniri and Elizabeth (Baker) Strattan. Zirari Strattan was 
a native of New Jersey, and when a young man came West 
to Ohio, and in 1825 to Wayne County, Ind., where he was 
married in 1827 to Elizabeth, daughter of Hugh Baker, 
formerly of Guilford County, N. C, who came to Wayne 
County in 1826. His wife died at the age of twenty years, 
leaving two sons, Stephen S. being an infant. He married 
the second time, and to him were born five children. 
He died at the age of sixty-six years. He was by trade a 
shoemaker. Stephen S. Strattan, when sixteen years of age 
began to learn the wagon-maker's trade, and served an ap- 
prenticeship of three years. He then worked as a journey- 
man till 1859, when he engaged in business for himself He 
is now one of the leading manufacturers of Richmond, thor- 
oughly understanding his business in all its details. He was 
married Nov. 5, 1856, to Matilda, daughter of John Elderkin, 
and a native of Connecticut, who catne with her parents to 
Wayne County in 1839. To them have been born three 
children, but two are living. 

Aldison H. Study, County Surveyor, was born Sept, 25, 
1850, in Green Township, Wayne Co., Ind., a son of 



CITY OF RICHMOND. 239 

John Study. He was reared to farm life, and received his 
early education at the common schools. On reaching maturity 
he took a course in mathematics and natural sciences at Earl- 
ham College, devoting three years to his studies in connection 
with surveying, which he yet follows. He was elected to his 
present office in the fall of 1880 and re-elected in the fall of 
1882. He was married to Alice, daughter of Nathan Doan, of 
Richmond. They have had three children. Our subject's 
grandfather, Henry Study, was born Feb. 16, 1Y80, of German 
descent, in Pennsylvania, near the Maryland line, where he 
learned the blacksmith's trade. In 1802 he moved to New 
Windsor, Md., and was married Feb. 12, 1803, to Charlotte 
Cook. From this union ten children were born, of whom 
four survive — "William, born Aug. 27, 1808, a farmer of 
Green Township; Henry, born Oct. 16, 1810, residing in 
Green Township; Samuel, born Feb. 16, 1821, followed cabi- 
net-making many years in Hagerstown, but now resides in 
Toledo, Ohio, and Matilda, born April 15, 1823, widow of 
James Stanley. Those deceased are — Daniel, born Feb. 14, 
1804; Joseph, born Oct. 30, 1806; Martin, born Sept. 3, 1812, 
followed cabinet making till his death, which occurred about 
1874; Isaac, born Sept. 13,1814, and died July 18, 1847, and 
bis widow, Catherine (Greene) Study, is now Mrs. Laselle, of 
Williamsburg; Eliza, born April 1, 1818, and John, father 
of our subject. He was born Nov. 1,5, 1825, and followed 
farming through life on the farm where he was born. He 
was married to Nancy E., daughter of Elihu E. Smith, by 
whom he had three children — Aldison H. ; A. Emma, wife of 
George E. Clark, of Economy, and Arva C. Mr. Study died Oct. 
27, 1880. In 1819 he removed with his family to Wayne County 
and was one of the first blacksmiths of Green Township. He 
followed farming and blacksmithing through life, and died 
Aug. 6, 1862, his wife dying one year later. He was a 
leading Methodist, and with other pioneers was instrumen- 
tal in establishing Methodism in Wayne County, 

Job Worth Swain was born in Guilford County, N. C, 
Oct. 22, 1795, a sou of Thomas Swain, who was president of 
the first Board of Trustees elected for Richmond. He came to 
Indiana in 1816. Sept. 3, 1823, he was married to Nancy 



240 HISTOR"i' OF WAYNE COUNTY. 

Thorp, with whom he lived till his death. He had a birth- 
ri(>-lit in the Society of Friends and was discussed by the sect 
for marryinoj outside the church and for not being willing to 
say he was sorry. Previous to 1830 he was for some time 
engaged in the watch and clock business, and there are still in 
use in Richmond brass clocks which he made and which are 
good tiine-pieces. Later he carried on a machine shop in the 
building which has since been the residence of Major Finley. 
He subsequently built and occupied as a machine-shop the 
one-story brick dwelling house on South Pearl street, next 
James Elder's. He operated the first machinist's slide lathe 
ever brought to Richmond. He was at that time associated 
with James Gaar in the manufacture of castings and other 
machines. About 1835 Mr. Swain, Jonas Gaar, Achilles 
Williams and others engaged in a general foundry and ma- 
chine business on Linden Hill, part of which is now in the 
city limits. Through the dishonesty and mismanagement of 
the principal agent, Mr. Swain, with others, was reduced to 
bankruptcy. Being a man of indomitable will and persever- 
ance he was soon carrying on a machine shop for himself in 
the old cotton factory building that stood on the hill j ust west of 
the Gaar, Scott & Co's works. He afterward manufactured 
shoe pegs and lasts. About 1840 he formed a partnership 
with Cornelius Yanzant and carried on business on Middle 
Fork, to which place he moved his family March 6, 1841. 
The business was quite profitable for the times, but money 
was very scarce and a man that had $10 in cash was a 
curiosity. As an example we cite the following: Patrick 
Justice, of Muncie, owed Mr. Swain a small bill for shoe- 
pegs. He came to Richmond and told D. P. Wiggins & Co. 
that he wanted to pay the bill. Wiggins sent the word to 
Peter McFarlin (Mr. Swain's brother-in-law) who sent his boj 
post haste to tell Uncle Job. Mr. Swain dropped his apron, 
put on his coat and started on foot to town. Before reaching 
there several parties informed him that a man wanted to pay 
him some money. Mr. Vanzant withdrew from the firm and 
Mr. Swain continued the business till his death, July 29, 
1846. The demand for his manufactures was at that time 
greater than his ability to supply, and he was in a fair way 



CITY OF RICHMOND. 241 

to retrieve his fortune. He was a man ot fine mechanical 
ability, more than ordinary reasoning powers, coupled with 
unswerving integrity, and a patience under affliction that 
likened him to the Job of old. He held to no religious creed 
but had little respect for any who did not hold to the father- 
hood of God and the brotherhood of man. 

R. W. Talhelm, of the firm Wm. H. Middleton & Co., was 
born in Hagerstown, Md,, May 1, 1838, a son of Joseph, Jr., 
and grandson of Joseph Talhelm, Sr. His grandfather was a 
native of Germany, and came to America when a young man, 
locating in Pennsylvania, where Joseph, Jr., was born. The 
latter was by trade an architect and builder, and lived in dif- 
ferent States, lastly in Indiana, where he died in 1859. H. 
W. was the eldest of the family. He learned the trade of his 
father, working at it several years. He has been a resident of 
Richmond since 1857. Aug. T, 1862, be enlisted in Company 
B, Fifth Indiana Cavalry, and served till June 15, 1865, par- 
ticipating in the battles of Atlanta, siege of Knoxville, and 
many others. He returned home at the expiration of his 
term of service uninjured. In 1879 he became associated 
with Wm. H. Middleton. He was married Oct. 16, 1866, to 
Sarah Brunton, who died June 25, 1875. Mr. Talhelm is a 
member of the I. O. O. F. fraternity, and is Treasurer of 
Whitewater Lodge, No. 41. He has taken all the degrees of 
the lodge and encampment. 

James Eli Taylor. M. D.^ was born in Sewellsville, Ohio, 
April 5, 1843, a son of Barnett and Letitia (McPherson) Tay- 
lor, natives ot Belmont County, Ohio, his father of Welsh 
and his mother of Scotch descent. His mother's grandfather 
was a native of Scotland and a representative minister of the 
Methodist church in Eastern Ohio, in the early part of the 
present century. Her father, James McPherson, contracted 
disease while a soldier in the war of 1812 that caused his 
death. Dr. Taylor's father was the eldest son of Eli Tay- 
lor, and was born in 1818, in Belmont County, Ohio, where 
he still resides. He has been a Justice of the Peace twenty- 
one years, and has never had a decision overruled by a higher 
court. He is a leading member of the Methodist church 
and has been a Steward and Class-leader many years. Our 



242 HISTORY OF WAYNE COUNTY. 

subject received a Hi^h-School education and had entered 
college when the war broke out, Oct. 15, 1861, he left col- 
lege and enlisted in the Fifth Ohio Cavalry as a private, but 
for meritorious service was promoted to Orderly Sergeant, First 
Lieutenant, Captain, Acting Assistant Adjutant-General, and 
Assistant Adjutant-General on the staff of General Thomas 
T. Heath. He served over four years. The first important 
service performed by his regiment was tearing up the track 
of the Mobile & Ohio Railroad. He was subsequently in the 
engagement of Shiloh, Corinth, Hernando, Grant's campaign 
in Mississippi, Cherokee Station, Resaca, Dallas, Allatoona 
Mountain, Atlanta, Jonesboro, Lovejoy Station, Bear Creek, 
Macon, Buck Head Creek, Savannah, Altamaha River, Black- 
well, Aiken, Monroe Cross-Roads, Averjsboro, Bentonville, 
Raleigh, and in many skirmishes. He was mustered out at 
Charlotte, N. C, Oct. 30, 1865. The following December 
he entered the Iron City Commercial College in Pittsburg, 
remaining there till May, 1866. He then commenced the 
study of medicine and soon after engaged in the drug business 
in Bay City, Mich., still continuing his studies. In 1869 he 
attended a course of lectures at the Miami Medical College, 
and in 1871 graduated from the College of Medicine and Sur- 
gery, Cincinnati. He then removed to Richmond where he 
has built up a good practice. He is a diligent student of his 
profession and is a very skillful physician. He is very sym- 
pathetic and benevolent, and none are so poor that they may 
not receive medical treatment from him. Dr. Taylor is a 
Master, Royal Arch and Knight Templar Mason. From 1873 
till 1875 he was Captain-General of the Richmond Command- 
ery, and in 1876 was elected Eminent Commander. In poli- 
tics he is a Republican, and in 1869 took an active part in 
the Republican Convention of the Sixth Congressional Dis- 
trict of Michigan. While a member of the Council of Ports- 
mouth, now incorporated with Bay City, he was instrumental 
in saving the township $70,000. He was married Nov. 8, 
1871, to Sarah H. Snell, of Fort Plain, N. Y. 

Isaac Cooper Teague, M. D., Richmond, Ind., was born 
in Dayton, Ohio, in 1826, a son of Samuel and Prudence 
(Cooper) Teague. His great-grandfather was , killed in the 



CITY OF RICHMOND. 243 

Eevolutionary war. His grandfather, Samuel Teague, Sr., 
was a native of South Carolina, and one of the first settlers 
of Miami County, Ohio, going there when Samuel, Jr., was 
a child. His mother was a native of Georgia, a daughter of 
Isaac Cooper, also an early settler of Ohio. His parents sub- 
sequently removed to "Wabash, Ind., where his father died in 
1875, and where his mother still lives. Isaac Cooper is the 
eldest of their seven children, six sons and one daughter. He 
was reared on a farm, but was given an academical education. 
After reaching his majority he began reading medicine with 
Dr. H. H. Gillen, of Wabash, Ind., and afterward took a course 
at Jefferson Medical College, Philadelphia, Pa., graduating 
in 1857. He then began the practice of his profession with 
Drs. H. H. Gillen and Hollo way, two of the leading physi- 
cians of Indiana. In 1870 he came to Richmond, and now 
has a practice unsurpassed by any physician in the county. 
He is versed in the Allopathic, Eclectic and Homeopathic 
schools and is now independent of an}' school, practicing as 
his judgment dictates. He is a man who thinks and acts for 
himself, believing in advancement in all creeds and doctrines. 
He was married Jan. 13, 1853, to Joanna Miles, of Miami 
County, Ohio. They have five children — Martha, now Mrs. 
Frank Fletcher; Laura, now the wife of Dr. Harry C. How- 
ells, of Chicago, 111.; Edwin D., a student in the college at 
Fort Wayne, Ind. ; Myrtle and Pearl. 

Enos Thomas^ son of Ellis and Phosbe (Van Matre) 
Thomas, was born in Tyler County, Va., Jan. 9, 1812. His 
parents were natives of Pennsylvania, but of Welsh descent. 
His father was early left an orphan, and was reared in a Ger- 
man family. He was married in Washington County, Pa., 
in 1788, and in 1798 removed to Tyler County, Va. In 1830 
he removed to Wayne County, Ind., three of the older chil- 
dren having preceded him. He died in 1832, leaving a family 
of thirteen children — Saul, Rachel, Jonathan, David, N"ancy, 
Martha, Evan, Ellis, Mary, William, Van Matre, Enos and 
Andrew J. The mother died in 1853. In religious faith 
they were Methodists. Five of the family are now living, 
the subject of our sketch being the only one in Wayne County. 
He was educated in Virginia, and followed the vocation of a 



244 HISTORY OF WAYNE COUNTY. 

farmer till 1867. Since then he has resided in Richmond. 
Politically he is a Republican. He has served as Justice of 
the Peace thirty-five years, and Notary Public a number of 
years. He has represented the North Western Life Insur- 
ance Company, of Milwaukee, Wis., in Richmond twelve 
years. He was married in 1838, to Lydia R. Frame, a native 
of Chester County, Pa., born Dec. 18, 1812, and a daughter 
of James Frame, who came to Wayne County in 1881, and 
located in Wayne Township. 

W. L. Thomas was born in Newark, Del., in 1838, the sixth 
of ten children of John H. and Snsan (Lindsey) Thomas, 
both natives of Newark, of Welsh descent. In 1839 
his parents moved to Richmond, Ind., where his father 
died Jan. 1, 1884, and his mother still lives. He received a 
common-school education, and when sixteen years of age be- 
gan learning the blacksmith's trade of his father. In August, 
1862, he enlisted in Company A, Sixty-ninth Indiana In- 
fantry, and participated in the battles of Champion Hill, 
Yicksburg, Richmond, Ky., Port Gibson, Arkansas Post, 
Mobile, and Chickasaw Bluffs. He was discharged at Mo- 
bile, Ala., July 6, 1865, and returned to Richmond and re- 
sumed his trade. In 1856 he became a member of the 
Volunteer Fire Department and filled all the ofiices, including 
President, when in 1872 the company disbanded. He then 
entered the present paid department. In 1881 he was ap- 
pointed Assistant Chief, and Jan. 8, 1884, was appointed 
Chief of the department. He joined the Odd Fellows frater- 
nity in 1866, and has taken all the degrees of the order, and 
has represented his lodge in the Grand Lodge and Grand En- 
campment of the State. He is also a member of the Red Men, 
and of Sol. Meredith Post, No. 55, G. A. R. In 1884 he joined 
the Knights of Pythias, and has taken all the degrees of the 
order. Sept. 16, 1867, Mr. Thomas was married to Francis 
C. Dennis. 

E. G. Vaughan. — 'This family is of Welsh descent, but 
the date of their coming to America is not known. John 
Yaughan was a practicing physician of A¥ilmington, Del. 
He was born June 15, 1775. His wife, Eliza Lewis, was 
born Sept. 28, 1778. They had a family of five children— 



CITY OF RICHMOND. 245 

Lewis C, born June 10, 1798; JohnD., Sept. 16, 1800; Joshua 
F., Kov. 22, 1802; Edmund B., April 1,1805; and Anna 
Eliza, Jan. 29, 1807. John D. was the only one who became 
a resident of Wayne County. He was reared in Delaware, 
receiving a good education. He chose the profession of the 
law as his life work, and became a prominent attorney of the 
county. He was married Nov. 3, 1820, to Lydia Z. Gilpin, 
born Feb. 15, 1802, of English descent. They came to 
Kichmond, Ind,, in 1826, where they lived till 1834, when 
cholera claimed Mr. Yaughan as its victim. In 1854 Mrs. 
Yaughan married Henry Hoover, who died July 23, 1868. 
She is still living. To Mr. and Mrs. Yaughan were born 
seven children — Lydia, Edward G-., Eliza (wife of S. R. LIp- 
pincott), John D., Anna E., Emma M. and Andrew F. Our 
subject, Edward. G., was born in Wilmington, Del., May 4, 
1824. He lived in Richmond from 1826 till 1834, and then 
returned to Delaware, and remained in Wilmington and 
Philadelphia, Pa., eight years. He then returned to Rich- 
mond, and soon after was employed, as clerk for Mark E. Reeves, 
of Hagerstown, and in 1849 purchased Mr. Reeves's interest. 
Two years later he abandoned business and returned to Rich- 
mond, and in 1852, became associated with his brother A. F. 
in business in Stockton, Cal. In 1854 he was elected City 
Treasurer. A year later the election resulted in a tie vote, 
and as an extra election was deferred Mr. Yaughan held the 
office from 1854 till 1856. He was in the State Comptroller's 
office, at Sacramento, in 1856 and 1857. In tke spring of 
1858 he returned to Richmond, his brother having preceded 
him in 1857. They were associated together in the hard- 
ware and lumber business, also owning a foundry, till Dec. 4, 
1879, when A. F. died and E. G. transferred the business to 
his sons. Mr. Yanghan was married Nov. , 17, 1858, to 
Phoebe H. Crawford, of Oxford, Ohio. They have had five 
children — Frank C, Edward G., Jr., John D. (deceased), Wal- 
ter S. and Mary. 

C. F. Walters was born in 1840, in Kentucky, a son of F. 
Walters, who was a contractor and millwright in Kentucky 
and Tennessee. At the age of fourteen years our subject 
commenced to work with his father, witli whom he continued 



246 HISTORY OF WAYNE COUNTY. 

till the breaking out of the late war, in which he served three 
years and eight months. He then engaged in contracting 
and building, headquarters in Covington, Ky., till 1870, 
when he came to Richmond and was engaged with the mill- 
turnishing works, of Nordyke, Marmon & Co., until 1876. 
In that year he helped to organize the Richmond City Mill 
Works, of which he was made a director and manager, in 
which position he still continues. His mechanical skill to- 
gether with his natural genius has resulted in the invention 
of several important pieces of mechanism, Mr. Walters has 
been identified with the Knights of Pythias since 1871. He 
was married in 1866 to Adella Lucas, of Pulaski, Tenn. They 
are the parents of five children, 

William Percival Waring^ physician and surgeon, was 
born April 18, 1827, in Fayette County, Ind., a son of Joshua 
and Margaret (Haughton) Waring. He was reared on the 
farm, and his father dying when he was fourteen years of age, 
his labors were so increased that his school advantages were 
limited. At the age of seventeen years he entered the Beech- 
grove Academy, chopping wood for his board. In two terms 
he fitted himself to teach school, an occupation he followed 
three years. He then began the study of medicine, under 
Dr. John T. Plummer, of Richmond, and soon entered the 
Ohio Medical College, graduating in 1852, when he received 
the degree of M. D, He then practiced his profession in 
Richmond, two years in partnership with Dr, John T. Plum- 
mer, after which he practiced seven years in Thorntown, 
Boone County, It)d. He returned to Richmond in 1861, 
where he has since practiced medicine. July 3, 1852, he 
was married to Semira Hiatt, of Milton, by whom he has 
had three children. The Doctor has been a member of the 
Odd Fellows fraternity since 1866. He belonged to the Wayne 
County Medical Society during its entire existence, a period 
of about twelve years, serving most of the time as its Secre- 
tary. In 1862 he joined the State Medical Society. He is 
by birthright a member of the Society of Friends, 

Joseph Wasso)i^ a native of Wales, immigrated, soon after 
his marriage, to America, and settled in Pennsylvania. Sub- 
sequently removed to North Carolina, where a family of 



CITr OF KICHMOND. 247 

seven sons and two daughters was reared. He was a soldier 
in the war of the Kevolution in the division commanded by 
General Greene. He was one of a party detailed to look 
after the Tories in that part of the country, and in a skirmish 
with them was shot by one of his Tory neighbors from behind 
a tree, and was thereby disabled for life. The ball remained 
in his loins forty years, when it was removed by his wife with 
a knitting-needle. Early in the present century he removed to 
Kentucky, and a few years later to Wayne County, Tnd.,and 
settled in the eastern part of the county, near the Ohio State 
line. All his children married an I located in that vicinitv. 
Joseph Wasson and Peter Fleming were the iirst white men 
to explore the eastern part of Wayne County, and entered 
several hundred acres in the land-office at Cincinnati. He 
died in the county at the age of eighty-live years. John 
Macamy Wasson, a grandson of Joseph, is a native of Wayne 
County. In a late history of the county he contributed to its 
pioneer chapter, and subsequently published "Annals of 
Richmond and Yicinity." In 1875 he published the " Cen- 
tennial Monthly," and from 1876 to 1880 the Olive Bmnoh, a 
peace paper. In 1884 he published and edited " Travels and 
Scenes in Foreign Lands," by the late Alexander Smythe, a 
work of much merit and interest. To the press of his county 
he is often a contributor, and also for journals other than local 
his pen is employed in advocacy of radical reforms. 

O. H. TFe/eZ, pump dealer, plumber, and gas-fitter, was born 
in 1829, in Hanover, Germany, a son of John W. and Anna 
Wefel, the former deceased, and the latter living at the age 
of ninety years. He was reared to farm life, and received a 
common-school education. He came to America in 1852, 
locating where he still resides. He first made the old log 
pumps in and around Richmond, and in 1861 commenced 
handling the patent pumps, and is now doing a first-class 
business. Since 1882 he has devoted some time to plumbing, 
gas-fitting, etc. He was married to Anna G. Nieman, a 
native of Hanover, Germany. Mr. Wefel is a member of 
Webb Lodge, No. 24, A. F. & A. M., and also belongs to 
the I. O. O. F. fraternity. 

JRev. H. Wickemeyer ^ pastor of St. John's Lutheran 
Church, Richmond, Ind., was born in Hanover, Germany, 



248 HISTORY OF WAYNE COTJNTY. 

March 15, 1843, the only child ofGrodfried and Clara Wicke- 
meyer. He was edncated for the ministry of the Lutheran 
chnrch, in Herniannsburg, Hanover, Germany. In 1872 he 
was called to the United States, by the Joint Synod of Ohio, 
and examined at Columbus by the faculty of the Capital 
University. He was ordained at Eaton, Ohio, in October, 
1872, by Revs. G. Baughman, G. Groth and R. Herbst. He 
served the congregation at Eaton till March, 1873, when he 
was called to St. Paul's Church, Richmond, Ind., and in 1876 
accepted a call to his present charge. His church is in a 
prosperous condition, he having since 1876 confirmed 186 
applicants and received forty-six grown persons into the 
church, making a total addition of 232 members during his 
pastorate. 

John M. Westcott^ President Hoosier Drill Works, Rich- 
mond, Ind., was born in Union County, Ind., in 1834, a son of 
Henry and Sarah (Dyche) Westcott, his father a native of New 
Jersey, of English descent, and his mother a native of Ken- 
tucky, of German descent. His parents were married in Warren 
County, Ohio, and in 1832 moved to Union County, Ind., 
where his mother died in January, 1883, aged eighty years, 
and where his father still resides. They had a family of four 
children — Ruth E., George H.. John M., and Jennie M. The 
early part of our subject's business life was devoted to the 
dry-goods trade, and later to the grain and feed trade. 
In 1862 he removed to Richmond, and continued the 
latter branch of business till 1872, when he bought an 
interest in the Hoosier Drill Works, then located at Milton, 
Ind. For four years he turned his attention closely to the 
business, and in 1876 got a controlling interest by baying out 
Isaac Kinsey, paying him $80,750 for $9,000 worth of the 
original stock. About the same time Omar HoUings- 
worth purchased an interest in the business. In the spring 
of 1878 the company bought the ground on which the present 
works are located, and erected the buildings the following 
summer. In 1881 Mr. Westcott purchased the interest of 
Mark Reeves, paying him $90,000 for $16,000 worth of the 
original stock. Previous to this, J. A. Carr and F. A, Wilke 
had purchased interests in the business, and since 1881 the 



CITY OF RICHMOND.J 249 

entire business has been owned by Mr. Westcott and bis 
three sons-in-law. In 1880 he purchased the property lying 
between Main and South A and Fourteenth and Sixteenth 
streets, at a cost of $27,000. It was already laid out with 
walks and drives, being designed originally as the site of an 
institution of learning. Mr. Westcott immediately began 
having it improved, and the second year erected a substantial 
and modern brick residence, and since then three additional 
residences have been added, one for each of the sons-in-law. 
In the spring of 1883 Mr, "Westcott purchased forty-four feet 
on Main, between Seventh and Eighth streets, and erected a 
four-story brick business block with stone front. It is finished 
in modern style, heated with steam, and having all necessary 
conveniences. Mr. Westcott has been a member of White- 
water Lodge, No. 41, I. O. O. F,, a number of years. He 
has been a member of the Methodist Episcopal church since 
1849, and is a liberal contributor to all causes that tend 
to elevate society and benefit mankind. While he is a 
man of liberality to public and private improvements, 
he never forgets the needs of the men in his employ, 
never allowing them to sufi'er when they need his aid, 
from sickness or other causes. He was married in 1855 
to Carrie Mitchell, a native of Warren County, Ohio, but 
a resident of Wayne County. They have a family of seven 
children — Alice C, wife of Omar Hollings worth; Lucilla B., 
wife of J. A. Carr; Jennie M., wife of F. A. Wilke; Charles 
G., Burton, Harry and Maude. 

Daniel P. Wiggins. The ancestors of the Wiggins fam- 
ily were of English nativity, three brothers, Brewster, David 
and Daniel, coming to this country about the middle of the 
eighteenth century. They settled on Long Island, where 
Daniel gained considerable prominence as a physician. His 
eldest son, Daniel, was also a physician, and practiced in 
Suffolk County, L. I. Daniel, son of the latter, was born in 
Suffolk County, and was by trade a tanner. He married 
Sally Piatt, also a native of Long Island. To them were 
born seven children — Daniel P., our subject; Phcebe, married 
Andress Titus; Walter, learned the shoemaker's trade and 
settled in 'New York City ; Abel, a farmer, resided on Long 
17 



250 HISTORY OF WAYNE COUNTY. 

Island; Hannali, widow of William Yarrington, still resides 
on the island; Elizabeth, married Edward Petty, and subse- 
quently removed to Richmond, Ind., where she died ; Will- 
iam, a shoemaker of New York City, became wealthy and 
died in 1881, leaving one child. Daniel P., the eldest of the 
family, was born Nov. 23, 1794. When quite young he was 
apprenticed to Elias Hicks, of Queen's County, to learn the 
tanner's trade. After completing his trade, Jan. 3, 1814, he 
was married to Phoebe, daughter of John and Mary (Smith) 
Dodge, a native of New York City, born Sept, 2, 1796. Soon 
after his marriage he enlisted in the war of 1812, and served 
till its close. He then settled in Queen's County, L. I., and 
worked at his trade in the yard of Elias Hicks, who allowed 
him to dress hides on shares. He subsequently had his share 
manufactured into shoes, and in 1818 loaded them into a two- 
horse wagon and started for the West. After a long and 
tiresome journey he reached Richmond, Ind., where he ex- 
changed his goods with Edward Frost, for a farm near Wash- 
ington, Clay Township. He afterward sold his wagon and 
one horse, and with the other returned to the East. He re- 
mained there working at his trade till 1823, when he moved 
his family to Indiana and located at Richmond. Several 
years prior to this Robert Morrisson had erected a tannery in 
Richmond, and here Mr. Wiggins was employed as a journey- 
man ten years, and then succeeded Mr. Morrisson in the busi- 
ness, and conducted it till he was succeeded by S. R., C. O. 
and J. D. Wiggins. In his business transactions he was 
prompt and reliable, and was equally exact with others. In 
1844 he became a member of the Society of Hicksite Friends, 
and ever after was a strict adherent to their doctrines. Polit- 
ically he was first a Whig and afterward a Republican, and 
was sevei-al times elected County Commissioner, in which 
office he displayed his public spirit by favoring all movements 
that tended to aid in any degree his county. He retired from 
business in 1851, and enjoyed the quiet of private life till the 
fall of 1875, when he died, leaving his widow, who still sur- 
vives him, aged eighty-eight years. They had a family of 
eleven children, all of whom were residents of Wayne 



CITY OF RICHMOND. 251 

County — William was born Oct. 2, 1814. He worked at the 
tanner's trade many years in Richmond, and died here March 
29, 1855. He married Emma Pyle, who died in Indianapo- 
lis. Henry was born Oct. 16, 1816, and died April 4, 1842. 
He was a tanner and harness-maker by trade. He married 
Lavinia Pyle, now of Indianapolis. Andress S. was born 
Aug. 15, 1818. He learned the molder's trade, and from 1844 
till 1858 carried on a manufacturing business at Hagerstown. 
Since 1858 he has been engaged in farming. In 1837 he mar- 
ried Rebecca C, daughter of Ezra and Elizabeth Boswell, a 
native of Richmond, born June 4, 1820. Of their eleven 
children but six are living. Politically he is a Republican, 
and has held the office of County Commissioner several 
terms. Stephen R. was born April 12, 1820. He learned 
his trade of his father, and worked for him till 1849, when 
he, with his brothers C. O. and J. D., succeeded him in busi- 
ness. He married Delitha Hunnicutt, and to them were born 
six children, three of whom are living. Charles O. was born 
May 23, 1822. He married Mary Thatcher, and to them have 
been born four children, three of whom are living — Frank, 
George and Ella. He is a member of the firm of Wiggins & 
Co., harness and collar manufacturers. John D. was born in 
Richmond, July 26, 1824. He worked at the tanner's trade 
in Richmond till 1872, when the firm of brothers was dis- 
solved, he retiring to private life. He married Ruth Shearon, 
and to them were born two children — Elizabeth F., who mar- 
ried Frank H. Glass, died March, 1872; Albert H., a railroad 
engineer, married Carrie Snyder. She died July 29, 1879, 
and he Nov. 19, 1882. Philemon F., born Sept. 16, 1826, 
was by trade a blacksmith. He was twice married, his first 
wife being Mary Burr, of Ohio, and his second Henrietta 
McCollough. He was a soldier in the war of the Rebellion. 
Mary E. was born Oct. 18, 1828, and married Geo. W. Barnes. 
She died Oct. 28, 1862, leaving three children, one son now 
living — Henry Barnes, of Indianapolis. Samuel B. was born 
March 6, 1831, and died July 6, 1873. He was a farmer. 
He married Virginia VanZant, who now resides in Logansport 
with their only child, a daughter. Sarah A. was born Aug. 



252 HISTORY OF WAYNE COUNTY. 

19, 1833, and died Feb. 23, 1861. She married General Will- 
iam P. Benton. Daniel Piatt, Jr., was born Sept. 20, 1835, 
and died Feb. 14, 1855. 

James W. Wilson, Recorder of Wayne County, Ind., was 
born in Centreville, Ind., Sept. 23, 1845. His father, C. T. 
Wilson, was born in Winchester, Ky., July 18, 1816, and in 
October, 1830, came to Wayne County, Ind., where he died, 
Nov. 26, 1862. His mother, Amanda M. Wilson, was born 
in Carroll County, Ya., Jan. 23, 1818, and in August, 1831, 
came to Wayne County. She was married to Mr. Wilson in 
Centreville. James W. Wilson's educational advantages 
were limited to the public school at Centreville, commonly 
called "Corn Cob College." May 15, 1865, he was ap- 
pointed Deputy Recorder of Wayne County, and served 
faithfully and efficiently till March 18, 1884, when he was 
installed Recorder, a position he is admirably litted to fill, his 
term of office being four years. Sept. 7, 1870, Mr. Wilson 
was married in Centreville to Eliza J. Pngh. To them have 
been born four children — Louisa, John P., Walter and 
Edward. 

Conrad Whikler is a native of Switzerland, born in 1818. 
When sixteen years of age he began learning the dyer's trade 
and followed it in his native country till 1848, when he came 
to the United States and settled in Missouri, but two years 
later went to the Eastern States, and in 1859 returned to 
Switzerland, and in 1863 came again to America and located 
in Richmond, Ind. In 1879 he erected a two-story brick 
building 40 x 30 feet, and established his present dye works. 
He has all the modern improvements, and is prepared to do 
all kinds of steam dyeing and cleaning. Mr. Winkler was 
reared in the German Reform church. He is unostentatious 
and retiring in his manner, devoting his time exclusively to 
his business. In 1853 he married Elizabeth Snyder. They 
have had seven children, but three of whom are living — 
Eliza, Anna and Charles. 

Oli'oer Yates was born in Montgomery County, N. Y., 
May 31, 1833, a son of Oliver and Abigail (Ostrom) Yates, 
his father a native of Montgomery County, N. Y., and his 



CITY OF RICHMOND. 253 

mother of the same state, of English descent. He received 
a common-school education, and when eighteen years of age 
began learning the carpenter's- trade. In 1854 he moved to 
Yellow Springs, Ohio, and subsequently went to Sylvania and 
Toledo, working at his trade. In 1860 he came to Eichmond 
and worked as a journeyman till 1871. He then commenced 
contracting, and has since built some of the finest dwellings 
and public buildings in Richmond. In 1879 his son became 
associated with him, the firm name being Yates & Son. Mr. 
Yates has been a member of the City Council since 1881, and 
takes an active interest in all that pertains to the interest of 
the city. He has been a member of the Odd Fellows' 
fraternity since 1861, and is now a Trustee of Woodard 
Lodge, No. 212, and is a member of the Grand Lodge of 
Indiana. He was married in 185-1 to Eva E. Vedder, a native 
of Fultonville, IST. Y. They have two children — Stephen O. 
and Lizzie L. 

Stephen 0. Yates, architect, contractor and builder, was 
born Aug. 20, 1854, in Toledo, Ohio, a son of Oliver and Eva 
Eliza Yates, natives of New York, where they were married in 
1853. Our subject learned the trade of a carpenter and joiner, 
and in 1880 he commenced business with his father under the 
firm name of O. Yates & Son, contractors and builders. He 
was married March 16, 1880, at Richmond, Ind., to Louie 
Cook. They have one child — Florence Edith. Politically, 
Mr. Yates is a Republican. 

Eev. John J. Young, pastor of St. Paul's Evangelical 
Lutheran Church, Richmond, Ind., was born in Rhenish Ba- 
varia, Germany, Sept. 13, 1846, a son of John M. and Eva C. 
(Krucker) Young. His mother died in 1851, and in 1858 his 
father came to the United States and located in Baltimore 
County, Md. He and our subject's only brother now reside 
in Baltimore. In 1862 John J. Young enlisted as a teamster 
in the United States army. In June, 1863, he was captured 
near Rockville, Md., but was paroled the next day. In the 
spring of 1864 he was transferred to the New York Engi- 
neer's Corps, and served till the close of the war. At the 
time of his enlistment he had no English education, but he 



254 HISTORY OF WAYNE COUNTY. 

took up the study of the language and at the time of his dis- 
charge could talk, read and write quite fluently. After his 
return home he learned the baker's trade, but still continued 
his studies. In 1869 he entered the preparatory department 
of the Gettysburg College, Pa., and graduated from the col- 
legiate and theological departments in 1877. He at once en- 
tered upon the discharge of ministerial duties in Garrett 
County, Md., and remained there till October, 1882, when he 
came to Richmond to his present charge. Mr. Young was 
married in 1878 to Louisa E. Messersmith, a native of Balti- 
more, Md., but of German parentage. They have two 
daughters. 

D. K. Zellei\ senior member of the firm Zeller & Co., 
cracker manufacturers, Richmond, Ind., was born in Butler 
County, Ohio, a son of John and Susan (Kumler) Zeller, both 
natives of Pennsylvania, of Swiss descent. He was reared on 
a farm and received a common-school education. He enlisted 
in the war of the Rebellion in the One Hundred and Sixty- 
seventh Ohio Infantry, and was appointed Captain of Com- 
pany K. In November, 1864, he came to Richmond and 
became a partner in the firm W. H. Lanthum & Co., and in 
1866 took charge of the bakery, where he has since had a large 
and lucrative trade. Mr. Zeller has been identified with the 
public interests of the city many years, and has served as 
Commissioner and Councilman. He was married to Mary C. 
Koerner, a native of Virginia but since infancy a resident of 
Union County, Ind. They have three children — John G., 
Emma C. and Silas A. Their daughter has been a prominent 
teacher of Richmond, but at present is in Europe. Mr. and 
Mrs. Zeller are members of the Presbyterian church. 

Christian Zimmer was born in Bavaria, Germany, in 1818, 
a son of Daniel and Elizabeth Zimmer. His father died in 
his native country, and in 1829 or 1830 his mother, with her 
two sons, came to the United States and located at Funks- 
town, Md., where she died in 1838. Mr. Zimmer learned the 
trade of a confectioner in Hagerstown,Md., working at it there 
from his fourteenth to his twentieth year. He attended school 
three years in Maryland. After coming to Richmond he 



CITY OF RICHMOND. 255 

manufactured candies and ran a wholesale notion and candy 
wagon twenty years, supplying the merchants in the sur- 
rounding towns. He also had a store one door east of George 
Knollenburg's. He subsequently lived in Centreville three 
years, but returned to Richmond to assume the duties of the 
recorder's office, serving in that position four years, his terra 
ending March 17, 1884. Mr. Ziramer was married in 1840 to 
Ellen D. Hartley, of Hamilton, Butler Co., Ohio. They have 
had four children — John H., a soldier in the late war, now 
deceased; Mrs. Mary Gorman, Mrs. Jennie Oldham and Mrs. 
Cora Winder. Mr. Zimmer has been a member of the Meth- 
odist Episcopal church over forty years, and in his daily life 
tries to always do as he would be done by. 




CHAPTER YIT. 



ABINGTON TOWNSHIP. 



Organized from Washington and Wayne Townships. — Set- 
tled LIKE Boston, in 1806. — Formed in February, 1837. — 
Boundary and Area. — Its Assessed Valuation. — Popu- 
lation since 1850. — The History of its First Settlement. 
— Village of Abington. — Its Growth. — Business of 
1874 AND 1884. — Churches and Societies. 

This was originally a part of both Washington and Wayne 
townships, and was among the first settled portions of the 
county, while prospectors were in the county as early as 
1805. It has been clearly ascertained that no permanent 
settlement of the county occurred until the winter of 1805 -'6, 
and the spring following. It has been stated that Abington 
Township was settled in 1805, but this is a mistake, with the 
exception of the fact that lands were selected in 1805, which 
became permanently settled in 1806. 

The township was not organized until February, 1837, and 
its voting precinct was established at the village of Abing- 
ton. The western part of the township and the central is 
good level or slightly rolling agricultural lands. On the 
east the East Branch of the Whitewater passes through it, 
first south, then southeasterly and again south, crossing the 
township line into Union County, one and three-fourths 
miles from its eastern border. This section is hilly, but the 
bottoms lands are rich, and the country around is settled by 
well-to-do farmers, many of them the direct descendants of 
the pioneer settlers of the township. The Elk Horn Branch 
enters the township in the northeast corner and flows into 
the Whitewater within a half a mile of its entry into the 
township. There is one other small tributary on the east and 
several on the west which empty into the Whitewater. On 

256 



ABINGTON TOWNSHIP. 257 

the western side, in the southern part, Butler Creek, which 
rises in the township, passes out, and a small tributary to 
Poland's Fork rises near the northern central portion and 
with two branches flows west, uniting as they pass into Wash- 
ington Township. It has thus all the water necessary for 
domestic and stock purposes, and the township is well 
adapted tor stock-raising. 

METES AND BOUNDS, ETC. 

The township lies in the southern tier and is the central 
one being seven miles to the western and six to the eastern 
line of the county. It has twenty-two sections of land or an 
area of 14,083 acres, of which 13,417.34 acres are found upon 
the assessment roll, leaving eQ2M for water-way or unac- 
counted for. 

It is bounded on the north by Centre Township and a coi- 
ner of Boston; on the east by Boston; on the south by Union 
County and one mile of Fayette, and on the west by Wash- 
ington Township. . , . i • Tor. 

The valuation of the real estate of the township, Jan 
1, 1883, was $383,680; of personal property, $157,235; total 
valuation, $540,915. 

The population in 1850 was 1,042; 1860, 924; 1870, 833 
1880 837, giving a steady decline since the first mentioned 
date'to 1870, and the gain since is far short of the natura 
increase. There has been very little gain in the county ot 
Wayne the past decade outside of its corporated towns. 

EAKLY SETTLERS. 

John Endsley, formerly from South Carolina, and in 1806 
from Ohio, settled in what is now the east part of Abington on 
John's Creek. With him, from Ohio, came his brother, 
Abraham Endsley, who settled on the Whitewater, a mile 
from the mouth of Elkhorn, and two miles from town John 
Endsley traveled the distance between South Caro Una and 
Wayne County seven times, five times on horseback, ihe 
farm on which he settled and died was afterward owned and 
occupied by his younger son, John, until his death in 1870. 



258 HISTORY OF WAYNE COUNTY. 

James, the elder son, resides on the farm adjoining on the 
west, being that on which Andrew Endsley had settled, who 
was the father of Andrew, Jr., John, Sr., Abraham, Hugh, 
Thomas, Samuel, and Peter Endsley. 

In 1806 John Cox, from Kentuck}', purchased the land of 
which the site of the present town of Abington is a part. He 
died in March, 1811. His death is said to have been the first 
in the township. The land was inherited by his son John, 
whose sons were Joseph and John. Joseph and his father 
laid out the town. 

Charles Hunt, from Korth Carolina, settled in the southeast 
part of the present township, in the year 1807. His sons 
George, John, William, Smith, Charles, and Stephen G. pre- 
ceded him the same year, Jonathan, James, and Timothy 
came two or three years later. George was the first surveyor 
in the county, and the first clerk of the County Courts. Tim- 
othy settled about a mile east of town, where he and his wife 
both died. The farm is owned by his sons Charles, Levi, 
and Andrew. Smith settled in the northeast part of the 
township, and died in 1855; Stephen G., near James Ends- 
ley's; John Hunt, northeast of town; lands owned by his 
sons, Levi and Charles Hunt, and Wilson Hunt. 

Henry Fender, from North Carolina, after a sojourn of a 
year or two eight miles south of Richmond, with six chil- 
dren, settled in 1810 or '11, on the farm, half a mile north- 
west of town, on the Centreville turnpike. His sons were 
— Jonathan, who removed from the county; Gabriel, who set- 
tled a half mile west of town and is dead; Jacob, who settled 
and still lives a mile and a half from town, on the Centreville 
turnpike; Littleton, who died near Kankakee, III., and whose 
sons, John Milton and James H., reside in the township; 
Henry L., on his father's homestead; and John H. 

Gabriel Fender, brother of Henry, Sr., bought of David 
Railsback the farm three-fourths of a mile northeast of town, 
since owned by Nicholas Smith. 

Thomas Moffitt settled three-fourths of a mile south of 
town. By a change in county bounds his farm has been taken 
into Union County. On it was one of the forts built during 



ABINGTON TOWNSHIP, . 259 

the war of 1812, as a means of protection against the Indians. 
Another was built on the farm of Wm. Lewis, about a mile 
from the former. David Eailsback settled near town in 1807, 
and died Oct. 17, 1856. Nathan, son of David Railsback, 
Sr. (not the first settler), settled on the land now owned by 
his heirs, about two miles north of town. 

Thomas Bradbury first settled four miles southeast of the 
town, now Union County, afterward two miles north of town. 
Jas. Lamb, from Scotland, settled, about 1818, near the mouth 
of Elkhorn. He died in 1841, aged eighty-five. John Lamb 
son of James, settled near his father. Wm. Jarrett settled 
about two and a half miles northwest of Abington. George 
and Levi Jarrett settled near their brother William ; and an- 
other brother, Eli, where M. Rank now lives. 

David Carson settled in the northeast part of the township. 
His son David now occupies the homestead. He was son- 
in-law of Richard Rue, one of the first three settlers in 
Wayne County. John Plankenhorn bought of Wm. James 
the land now owned by his son, John Plankenhorn. Henry 
Long settled on section 17; Edmund Jones, Virginia., on sec- 
tion 18, and John Hendricks early owned the land where 
now Isam Stevens and John Madden reside. 

John Wright settled near the north line of the township. 
John Ellis, on land now owned by Wright's heirs. Spahr 
entered early several sections in the northwest part of the 
township. Michael Helms, from Virginia, bought lands in 
the southwest part of the township, now principally owned 
by his son, Isaiah Helms; and Daniel Clevenger, on land 
now owned by George Rodenberger, in the south part of the 
township. 

The first blacksmith was John Hunt, who was also a gun- 
smith. His widow was a daughter of Lazarus Whitehead. 

The first carding machine — a rude instrument — was put up 
by Richard Sedgwick and Smith Hunt, at the mouth of Elk- 
horn. John Brower next (1824, or about that year) built a 
carding and fnlling mill near the north part of Abington. 
Hugh Endsley, grandson of the first mentioned settler, put 
up the first grist-mill (corn cracker) on East Fork, a little be- 



260 HISTORY OF WAYNE COUNTY. 

low the mouth of Elkhorn, in 1808. Henry Whitinger, a few 
years after, built there a hewed log one, with two runs ot 
stones, one for corn and one for wheat. It was afterward 
bought by Julius C. Wood, who built a good frame flouring 
mill, now owned by his son, Yalentine Wood. The second 
grist-mill was built about the year 1826, nearly a mile from 
the village, by Joseph Cox. He sold it to Kalf Shawmbourie, 
who put up a better one, having a run of burr stones, and 
sold it to Merriman Brumfield. The latter another on or near 
the same site, with a saw-mill attached. 

As in other places along the Whitewater, rattlesnakes 
abounded here at an early day. About a mile above where 
the town now is, a number of women who were, on a Sunday, 
sauntering, for pastime, along the stream, are said to have 
killed, with clubs and poles, upward of thirty rattlesnakes. 

Bethlehem, one of the early villages of the county, exists 
no longer. It was located on the southwest corner of section 
24. In 1825 it had a population of about twenty, a store 
and a blacksmith shop. It is now part of a farm. 

VILLAGE OF ABINGTON. 

Abington is a very pretty village on the west bank of the 
East Fork of the Whitewater River. It is within less than 
one mile of the south line of the county, some ten miles 
southwest of Richmond, and is one of the oldest settled towns 
in the county. The village of Abington was laid out on the 
land of John and Joseph Cox, and platted Dec. 5, 1817. It 
was surveyed by J. Lewiston, under their supervision, and 
the record was made of the same soon after. The village was 
incorporated in August, 1819. Ten years later, January, 
1827, Abington had forty-two inhabitants, a fulling mill and 
carding machine, a general store, two taverns, as they 
were then called, and a blacksmith shop. 

The first merchant in Abington was Moses Cox, son of John 
Cox, Jr., about the year 1818. Some of his earlier successors, 
though, perhaps, not in the order mentioned, were Samuel 
Hall, Hafer & Glanten, Middlecough & Beeks, Bonebrake & 
Manning. Later, the following were as early, at least, as at 



ABINGTON TOWNSHIP. 261 

the dates mentioned: Whitinger & Matchett, Thomas Ellis, 
and Michael Dolon & Co., in 1839; William A. Beeks, Will- 
iam Lipscomb, John Leach in 1840; Williams & Dunbar, in 
1841; James Rnbey, Simpson Dye, in 1842; White & Hunt, 
in 1843; David M. Dunbar, Whitinger & Dye, E. F. Donlan, 
1845. 

A saw-mill was built by Thomas Manning, at Abington, 
who, some years after (about 1839) sold it to D. & J. Weaver, 
who attached a carding machine and fulling-mill, and iu 1845 
built a large woolen factory. This proving unprofitable, the 
building was sold and turned into a wagon and carriage shop. 
The same firm built a large flouring mill a short distance be- 
low the old site, also a saw-mill in 1849, which are now owned 
byJno. B. Craft & Co. 

The first wagon-maker was John Gilbert; the next, Will- 
iam Harp. The present ones are the four Green brothers, 
Thomas, Thaddeus, Daniel and Charles. 

The village grew fairly until the advent of turnpikes 
and railroads, and in 1850 had a population of 206. From 
that date the village has gradually declined in population and 
has not gained in general business, but it is solid so far as its 
business interests are concerned. 

In 1870 the population had fallen to 161, and the business 
interests were one dry-goods store, Haman Dobbs, proprie- 
tor; one grocery store, Joshua Dye, proprietor; three black- 
smiths, Thomas Stevens, Caswell Hollar, and Moses Mitchel. 
Harness-makers, Samuel and Frank Lell. Carpenters, An- 
drew Hunt, Ferdinand and Harrison Weber. Shoemaker, 
Daniel Jennings. 

There were two saw and grist mills, one Masonic lodge, one 
L O. 0. F., and one encampment. The latter have a fine 
hall, handsomely furnished. There are three churches, viz. : 
United Brethren, Methodist Episcopal and Christian. There 
have been few changes in the village the past decade, except a 
slight falling ofi" in population, being in 1880 put down in 
the census report at 148, and is probably fully that number 
at this writing. 

The first resident physician that practiced in the township 



262 HISTORY OF WAYNE COUNTY. 

was W. J. Matchett, in 1828. He was succeeded by James 
Rubv, who practiced some ten or twelve years, within which 
period, he took into partnership a former student of his, 
John M. Swallow, who is said to have had a very extensive 
practice, and died in 1849 at the early age of thirty-three. 
After him came Dr. John Cleveland, a successful practitioner, 
later residing at Centreville. He was followed by Moses G. 
Mitchell, of Ohio, now a Universalist preacher, John Q. A. 
Robbins, and James E. Swallow, son of John M. Swallow, 
above mentioned. 

Postmasters have been: Ralph Shawmbourie, Daniel "Wea- 
ver, Powell Slade and Bennett D. Bonebrake. 

CHURCHES. 

Methodist Episcopal Church. — The first religious society, 
says "Young's History," was the Methodist Episcopal, organ- 
ized at an early period of the settlement of the township. 
Among its early members were Thomas Moffitt and his wife; 
John Cox, his wife and son James; Peter Stevens, a preacher 
and also the first school-teacher, near Moffitt's; Henry Long, 
also a preacher, and his wife; Eli and Clark Penwell, and 
David Railsback and their wives; Henr}' Fender, his son 
Jacob, and John Fender, Sr. The first preaching was in 
dwellings. Their first meeting-house was a log building on 
the hill, near the site of their present brick house. 

The United Brethren formed a society about the year 
1818. Among their early members were Isaac Shelby, an 
exhorter, Thomas Manning, William Dye, Daniel Cleven- 
ger, with their wives, and George Bonebrake, a preacher. 
The first regular preacher is believed to have been John 
Ross. The society built a frame house about the year 1828; 
the present brick house in 1854-'55. This was a well-built 
house, and its interior was well and neatly finished. [It 
has, since the above was written, been nearly or quite de- 
stroyed by fire.] 

BIOGKAPHIOAL. 

H.'L. Fender was born on the farm where he now resides, 
in 1827, a son of Henry Fender, a native of North Caro- 
lina, who settled in Wayne County in 1811. He was reared 



ABINGTON TOWNSHIP. 263 

a farmer, receiving a limited education in the district schools. 
He now owns eighty-five acres of well-improved land, ad- 
joining the village of Abington. He at one time owned 
265 acres of land, and is one of the most substantial busi- 
ness men of the township. Politically he is a Eepublican. 
He has served his township as Trustee four terms. He was 
married in 1848 to C. J., daughter of William Jarrett, an old 
settler of the county. They have had four children, but two 
living — Milburn L. and Johu F. Martha A. died Oct. 26, 
1865, aged eight years, and Mary E., Feb. 9, 1871, aged 
eighteen years. Mr. and Mrs. Fender are both members ot 
the Methodist Episcopal church, and take an active interest 
in all matters pertaining to Christianity. 

Jacob JFender was born in Korth Carolina in 1806, the 
son of Henry and Elizabeth (Lang) Fender, natives of North 
Carolina, his father born in 1787, and his mother in 1789. 
In October, 1811, his parents came to Wayne County, Ind., 
and settled in the southern part of the county, in what is 
now Union County. In 1814 they removed to what is now 
Abington Township, and entered 100 acres of land and 
built a log cabin. They were members of the Methodist 
Episcopal church and zealous workers in the church. Their 
house was used for worship before a church was built. They 
had a family of eleven children — Jonathan, Gabriel, Susan- 
nah, Jacob, Littleton, Sarah, John H., Lydia, Sophia, Mary 
Ann, and Henry L. Our subject was the fourth child. He 
was married in 1829 to Betsey Ann, daughter of Elijah 
Holland, a native of Wayne County, Ind., born in 1811. 
After his marriage he bought 120 acres of land in Abington 
Township, where he still resides. He is of a generous and 
obliging disposition and has assisted many in financial em- 
barrassment, who have taken advantage of his generosity, 
thus defrauding him ot large sums of money. Mr. and 
Mrs. Fender have had one son — Laban L., who died in his 
twenty-third year, leaving one child — Celia. She married 
H. P. Jarrett, and still resides with her grandparents. They 
have an adopted daughter — Ada Moore. 

John H. Fender was born in Abington Township, Wayne 
Co., Ind., Jan. 9, 1814, a son of Henry Fender, a pioneer of 



264 HISTORY OF WAYNE COUNTY. 

Wayne County. He was reared a farmer, and now owns 
eio-hty acres of fine land, where he has lived since 1835. He 
joined the Methodist Episcopal church Au^. 12, 1830, and in 
1842 was licensed an exhorter. In 1873 he was licensed a local 
preacher. His ministerial work has been mostly confined to 
officiating at funerals and assisting in revival work, tin 1835 
he married Nancy, daughter of Morgan McMahan, of Union 
County. They have reared four children, three from in- 
fancy — Lovana J. Stinson (deceased); Susie L. Sweet, now 
Mrs. Andrew Kramer; James H. Fender, a nephew, mar- 
ried Miss Theresa McMahan ; and Miss Meda G. Kramer. 
Politically Mr. Fender is a Republican. 

James Riwiden Meek W2LB born in Wayne County, Ind., 
in 1823, a son of Joseph and Gulielma (Smith) Meek. His 
early life was spent on a farm. He obtained a good educa- 
tion, and taught twenty-five years, mostly in Wayne County. 
He was married in 1848 to Catherine E., daughter of Alex- 
ander Adair, and settled in Abington Township, where he 
has since resided. He owns a good farm of 180 acres, all 
well improved. Politically he has always been a Republi- 
can. He has been Township Assessor two years, and Con- 
stable several years. Mr. and Mrs. Meek are members of 
the Methodist Episcopal church. They have had eight chil- 
dren — John W., Joseph, Marcus L., Alexander, James R., 
Jr., David C. E., Charles A., and an infant (deceased). Mr. 
Meek's grandfather, John Meek, was a native of Henry 
County, Ky., and settled in Wayne County, Ind., in 1807, 
entering a quarter-section of land west of Richmond. He 
afterward removed to Abington Township, and subsequently 
to Owen County, Ind., where he died. He married Marga- 
ret Irwin. They had nine children — William, Joseph, Sarah, 
Mary, John, Jeptha, Jesse, born in Kentucky, and Eliza- 
beth and Lorenzo, born in Wayne County. His wife died, 
and subsequently he married Selena Stinson. They had five 
children — Bazelle, James, Lorenda, Cynthia and Barlow. 
His son, Joseph Meek, married Gulielma, daughter of John 
Smith, in 1816, and settled in Wayne Township. He after- 
ward removed to Randolph County, Ind., and eighteen 
months later settled on the farm now o\\ ned by our subject. 



ABINGTON TOWNSHIP. 265 

To him and his wife were born eleven children, seven of 
whom are living — John A,, James R., Nathan, Mrs. Marga- 
ret Ruley, Allen W., Jesse, Mrs. Sarah E. Zigler. Samuel S., 
William, Mary J., and Alfred are deceased. Mr. Meek died 
Aug. 22, 1883, aged eighty-nine years. Mrs. Meek is living 
with her son, in the eighty-fourth year of her age. She is 
probably the oldest member of the Methodist Episcopal 
church of Wayne County. 

J. M. Snyder was born in Union County, Ind., in 1821, a 
son of Michael and Nancy (Summers) Snyder. His grand- 
parents, Michael and Eve (Ely) Snyder, came to Indiana in 
1807 and settled in Brownsville Township, Union Connty. 
They had a family of nine children — Michael, Betsey, Moses, 
David, Isaac, Simon, Applebury, Ethel and. Polly. Michael, 
Jr., was fourteen years of age when his parents came to Indi- 
ana. He married Nancy, daughter of Simon Summers. To 
them were born four children — Eliza, Simon, John M, and 
Sarah E. His wife died in 1825, and he subsequently mar- 
ried Rachel (Summers) Dawson, a sister of his first wife. 
They had eight children — Rhoda, Eva, Mary, Daniel, Mi- 
chael, George, Andrew and Willie. Mr. Snyder died in 1877, 
aged eighty-three years. Our subject, J. M. Snyder, was 
reared on a farm and' has always followed that occupation. 
In 1853 he came to Wayne County and rented land in 
Abington Township four years. He then moved to Fayette 
County, but two years later settled on the farm where he 
now resides, buying at that time eighty acres. He now owns 
120 acres of well-improved land. He married Mary Ann, 
daughter of William H. Thomas. They have three children 
— Mary M., Oliver T. and Mattie. Mr. and Mrs. Snyder 
are members of the Christian church. 

Spencer Stephens, deceased, was a native of Yirginia, but 
when a young man '.went to North Carolina. He was 
married there, and in 1814 came with his family to 
Indiana and located in what is now Abington Town- 
ship, Wayne County. They had a family of nine chil- 
dren, five of whom are living — William, of Union County, 
Ind.; Sampson; Humphrey, of Decatur County, Ind.; Eliza- 
beth, wife of Joseph Wright, of Hancock County, Ind., and 
18 



266 



HISTORY OF WAYNE COUNTY. 



Eobert. Susan, Anna, Spencer, and Isom, are deceased. Mr 
Stephens died in 1839, aged seventy years. His wife died in 
1852, aged eighty-one years. Their son, Sampson, was born 
in North Carolina, March 22, 1806. He was married March 
22, 1846, to Catherine, daughter of Jacob Plessinger, of 
Ohio, and settled on the old homestead. He has a fine farm 
of 270 acres, a part of which his lather entered from the 
Government. Robert Stephens was born in what is now 
Union County, Ind., May 16, 1816. He was married Jan. 
1, 18-13, to Sarah, daughter of Jacob Plessinger, and has 
since resided in Abington Township, where he owns a fine 
farm of 115 acres. Mr. and Mrs. Robert Stephens have had 
seven children; four are living — Jacob E., William A., 
Harriet C, and Sarah E. Sophia A., Spencer S., and an in- 
fant are deceased. 




/-I 

I 
\ 



r 




^% s 



/t^'^^J^ ^^ 



-:/ 




^ 



CHAPTER YIII. 



BOSTON TOWNSHIP. 



Once k Portion of Wayne. — Its Early Settlement. — ]!^ot 
Organized Until February, 1835. — Metes and Bounds. — 
The South-East Township. — Population. — Its Grand Old 
Pioneers. — Topography. — Timber and "Water. — Town 
Officers. — Churches and Schools. — Boston. — Its Early 
History. — Tillage not Incorporated. — Lodges and Post- 
masters. — Biographical. 

boundary and organization. 

This township is one of the oldest settled townships in 
the county, and was until February, 1835, a part of Wayne 
Township. At that date it was organized into a separate 
township, and named "Boston." It is four miles north and 
south and six miles east and west, except that it has added to 
it on the northwest corner half of section 24, making it on 
one mile of its northern border six and one-half miles east 
and west. It is bounded on the north by Wayne Township, 
east by the Ohio State Line, south by Union County, and 
west by Abington and a portion of Centre townships. It 
lies in the extreme southeast corner of the county, and its 
above area of twenty-four and one-half square miles 
gives it 15,680, of which there is placed on the 
assessment roll 15,575.66 acres, with an assessed 
valuation in 1882 of $530,270. Its personal property 
amounted to $187,305, making a total value of 
$717,575. The polls of the township the same year num- 
bered 147. Its population in 1850 was 959; in 1860, 887; in 
1870, 894, and in 1880, 936. The principal stream in this 
town?hip is the Elkhorn, which enters it about one 
and one-half miles west of the Ohio line, and, running in 

367 



268 HISTORY OF WAYNE COUNTY. 

a southwesterly course, leaves the township one and 
three-fourths miles south of the northwest corner, 
about half a mile above the mouth of the stream. Some oi 
the earlier settlements in the county were made within its 
limits. With the exception of Holman, Rue, and a few 
others in that neighborhood, and John Cox, the Endsleys, 
and perhaps a few others in what is now called Abington, 
there were probably no earlier settlers in Wayne County. 
Thomas Bulla, Jacob Fonts and Jesse Davenport settled on 
the Elkhorn, four or iive miles southeast of Richmond; Dav- 
enport and one or two of the Foutses, lower down, within 
the present township of Boston — all the same year in which 
the Hoovers settled north of Richmond. The Hunts, the 
next year, settled on and near the Elkhorn, several miles be- 
low where Davenport settled. Mr, Davenport was a promi- 
nent citizen, became Associate Judge. He was killed at the 
barn-raising of Benjamin Koonts. A man by the name of 
Williams was killed at the same time. 

In the northwest part of the township Peter Weaver 
settled in 1807, on a part of the section (19) in the north- 
west corner of the township — the land now owned by Christo- 
pher C. Beeler, of Richmond. John Collins, in 1807, settled 
where Milton H. Beeson lives; James Lamb, a native of 
Scotland, on land now owned by Catharine, widow of John 
Lamb; James Lamb died in September, 1841, aged eighty- 
five years; Abraham Gaar, from Kentucky, in April, 1807, 
where his son Larkin now resides; Aaron Martin, in 1807 
or 180S, on a quarter, a part of which is now owned by 
Jeptha Turner; Jackson Rambo, an early settler, who died 
in 1816, aged fifty-five years, and in 181:6, his widow, in her 
eighty-seventh year; Wright Lancaster, from J^orth Carolina, 
in 1808, also Christopher Roddy and Joshua Meek; Isaac Bee- 
son, from the same State, in 1807; Robert Grimes, in 1808, 
and Abraham Esteb, Jacob Keesling, Pa., Armstrong Grimes 
and Wm. Parson all came in 1809. Adam Zeck, from Virginia, 
settled in the northeast corner of the township in 1810, and 
lived and died on the same farm. He was a blacksmith by 
trade. DavidfSchaffer came the same year and settled in the 
extreme northeast corner of the township. Simon Draper 



BOSTON TOWNSHIP. 269 

settled just south of Schaifer, the same year, both from Yir- 
ginia. This section of the township and the Elkhorn Valley 
were the first settled. Jas. Sulser came earl}', and his son, 
Hiram, now occupies the old homestead. Lazarus White- 
head, a British preacher, came on Dec. 25, 1805, the year 
the county was first settled. He officiated at the first 
funeral in the county, and also solemnized the first marriage. 
The cemetery was on his land. He settled in Elkhorn Val- 
ley. Wm. Burke came the latter part of the same yeai. 
Isaac Beeson came in 1807, and settled up the stream f om 
Whitehead. Wayne County was no exception to the general 
rule, the settlers who first came choosing their location near 
water, and the Elkhorn was settled from its head to its 
mouth. Then, again, these valleys were the richest lands, 
and the timber perhaps thicker, but no heavier, than farther 
away. 

In the north part of the township Fielding Gaar settled 
on a part of section 21, lately occupied by R. Rue, now 
owned by Justus Kroskopf. Wm. Williams settled in 181-1 
where Isaac Bulla resides. He was a maker of spinning- 
wheels, and removed to Richmond; was also a minister in the 
Society of Friends. Asa Jeffers settled on land now owned 
by Alonzo Osborn and Daniel W. Schafter. Adjoining this 
section on the south, James, William and Robert Grimes 
owned the land now owned by John T. Williams. Daniel 
Hart, from Korth Carolina, settled, in 1814, on the land 
now owned by Francis Hendricks. Henry Tinkle, John 
HoUett and Thomas Taylor all settled in the northeast part 
of the township. 

In the southern and southeastern section of the town- 
ship came Joshua Benton and Jeremiah Girton, both settling 
on sections 36; and James Holman, John Jordon, 1810, Ab- 
salom Rambo and Joseph Cravens all settled on section 35. 
Thos. Hyatt, a Revolutionary soldier, settled also in this sec- 
tion. Isaac Conly settled about one mile from where New 
Boston now stands. 

Wm. Holman settled on the southeast quarter of section 
34, adjoining town. John Miller, one of the first settlers on 
the southwest quarter, where his son, Wm. Miller, lives. 



270 HISTORY OF WAYNE COUNTY. 

Thomas Ward, early on section 33. Thomas Young, where 
Peter Shidler now lives. John Brattan, from North Carolina. 
Section 3, southwest of town, Samuel Beck, from North 
Carolina, on the southeast quarter. James Fisher, northeast 
quarter. Owen Seany, Sr., from North Carolina,'about 1809, 
southwest quarter, where he resided until his death in 1831. 
Section next west (4), Peter Mellender, one mile west from 
*own. John Rife, on the land now owned bj his son, Jacob 
Ri^e, a German Baptist (Dunkard) preacher. Isaac Esteb, on 
the nv^rthwest corner of the section. Benj. Jarvis, very early 
on the southwest quarter, at or near where Zachariah Osborn 
lives. He died in 1862, aged eighty-two years. 

Joel Moore settled on section 32, and not far off Samuel 
Jobe, a Baptist preacher, located his home. This was in the 
southwest portion of the township, 

TOPOGRAPHY. 

The southeast part of the township is nearly level, the 
edge of a large table-land extending into Ohio. This was of 
a swampy nature, originally, but since it has been drained, is 
probably the best land in the township. On each side of the 
Elkhorn for two miles it is hilly, where very fine building 
stone is found, but there are no minerals. The mill at Elk- 
horn Falls was erected in 1817 by Jesse Davenport. Afterward 
a saw-mill was added, all ran by water-power. This mill was 
rebuilt in the year 1859 by Addington & Brown and known 
as the " Relief Mills." Another mill was erected in 1825 on 
Short Creek, called the Short Creek Mills, which were kept in 
operation up to 1873. Both of these mills had a linseed oil 
attachment. It is stated that Chas. Hunt built a sort of tub- 
mill as far back as 1807, near the west line of the township, 
but, while the Hunts settled in the township the latter part 
of that year, it is doubtful about a mill being built prior to the 
winter or fall ofl808-'9. 

A half mile north of New Boston Jas. L. Hains built a 
steam saw-mill, and in 1866 Jno. J. Conly erected a sorghum 
mill, with a capacity of 100 gallons of syrup per day. Among 
the first physicians of the township were: Drs. Stevens, But- 



BOSTON TOWNSHIP. 271 

ler, Wheeler, Hiram Bull, David S. Evans and Wm. H. 
Evans. 

The iirst preacher was Lazarus Whitehead, Baptist. 

The first church was a Baptist, orsjanized in 1807 by Rev. 
Lazarus Whitehead. Members: Rev. Whitehead and wife, 
Aaron Martin and wife, and Chas. Hunt and wife. The first 
death, buried in the Whitehead cemetery, was the daughter 
of John Bsard, in the summer of 180S, and the second Jane 
Endsley, daughter of John Eodsley, three years — all the fall 
of the same year. 

The first marriage in the township and county was that of 
Miss May Whitehead and John Hunt. The license was se- 
cured at Lawrenceburg, the then county seat. 

The first church was a Baptist. The next two were the 
Methodist Episcopal and the Friends. 

The first preaching was across the creek from Jas. Ends- 
ley's, and the first baptism was in the creek near by, two be- 
ing immersed — Mary Hunt and Jas. Martin. These were 
also the first two to join the church after its original mem- 
bers. 

The first birth in the county was Jeptha Turner, son of 
John Turner, the first Sheriff of Wayne County. There were 
formerly three trustees, but this was changed early in the 
sixties. Since then they have been as follows (Term, two 
years): Jos. M. Bulla, two terms; Alfred Moore, two terms; 
Clayton Brown, one term; John J. Conway, one term; George 
H. Stephenson, three terms; Hiram Sulser, two terms; Jacob 
S. Moore, one term; Edward Timberlake, two terms. Judge 
Bailey Butter was Associate Judge for three years. Present 
officers : Trustee, Edward Timberlake ; Assessor, Stephen Far- 
low; Constable, E. R. Stover, and Justices of Peace, B. B. 
Dillman and David Paulus. 

The following names of justices of the peace appear in a 
number of old dockets. The years in which their respective 
records commence are also given. Isaac Esteb, 1819; James 
P. Burgess, 1829; Abraham Cuppy, 1834; Joseph A. Simp- 
son, Stephen McWhinney, 1835; Isaac MeJlender, 1839; Wm. 
Druley, 1841; Alfred Moore, 1851; John H. Stearns, 1854; 
James Esteb, 1856; Jacob F. Rinehart, 1869; Jacob F. Rine- 
hart, James P. Burgess, 1872. 



272 HISTORY OF WAYNE COUNTY. 

SCHOOLS. 

There are seven school-houses in the township, numbered 
from one to seven. During a wind storm in the summer of 
1883 Nos. i and 5 were blown down. The schools are brick, 
of good size and well furnished. The school history in first 
volume will give a full report of the schools of the township. 

CHURCHES. 

There are six churches located within the township, viz.: 
Universalist, Baptist, Methodist Episcopal, Christian, Friends 
and Myer's Chapel (Methodist Episcopal). 

friends. — Is located about two miles north of New Boston, 
the society being formed about the year 1809. The first res- 
ident minister was the Rev, Wm. Williams, from Tennessee. 
The society numbers some 150 members and their church, a 
frame building, was erected in 1875, Their first church was 
built of logs which was used up to 1854, when a brick was 
erected, which lasted until the frame one was occupied. 

The Methodist Episco'pal Church was organized about 1810, 
but the oldest inhabitant cannot recollect the exact date or its 
original members. They worshiped in an old log cabin for 
several years. In 1836 they erected their second church which 
was used about one-third of a century. In 1869 a handsome 
and substantial brick edifice was erected at a cost of $3,000, 
the building committee being John Druley, Ira Starr and H. 
H. Moore. The church has stood the test of time, and is still 
moving in the path of progress. In the summer a Sunday- 
school is kept during the season. The Rev. Geo, W. Bower 
has held the pastorate since 1874. The church was unfortu- 
nate in the loss of its records by fire a few years since. This 
was a serious loss, as memory failed to bring to mind much 
that was of value in the history of the church. 

Myer's Chapel of the Methodist Ex>isGopal Church was or- 
ganized in 1823, with Hugh Cull and wife, Mrs. McFadden, 
Isaac Beeson,! James Sulser and wife, Jas. P, Burgess and 
wife, and John Lamb and wife. The early preachers were 
the Eevs, Whitten, Miller and Jamison. Service was held 
at the house of Jas. P. Burgess for a number of years, in the 



BOSTON TOWNSHIP. 273 

open air in good weather, and in an old shop. In 1834 there 
was a great revival under the inspiration and direction of the 
Rev. — Dorsey, a young and eloquent preacher. The church 
reached a membership of sixty, and in 1848 erected the brick 
chapel, which is yet their place of worship, but has undergone 
much improvement. The present membership is twenty-five 
and the pastor the Rev. C. W. Tinsley. That noted and ec- 
centric preacher so celebrated in early days, Lorenzo Dow, 
preached several times in this .township. He generally 
preached in the open air, a log or a stump answering for a 
pulpit. In fact there were no buildings at that early day that 
would hold the mass of people who came from miles around 
to listen to homely, yet forcible, eloquence of the early 
backwoods orator and preacher. 

Baptist Church. — As before remarked, this church was or- 
ganized in 1807 in the western, or rather northwestern, part 
of the township, under the earnest work and zeal of Lazarus 
Whitehead. A log church was erected on the south end of 
the graveyard, which was on the farm of the minister, Mr. 
"Whitehead. This was destroyed after a service of two years, 
and another was built on the same site, also of logs, which 
served them until 1842, when the present church was erected. 
It is enclosed by a stone fence which was put up in 1832. The 
membership now is between sixty and seventy, and the church 
has always been fairly progressive and prosperous. It has 
always maintained a pastor and had regular preaching. 

The Universalist Church met with strong opposition 
from the Puritan element in its early struggle for exist- 
ence. The Methodist church refused them the use of 
their churches, and by a spirit of opposition aroused they 
were also debarred the use of the school-house, which, by the 
law of the State, made them free to all denominations of 
Christians. They did, however, meet in the school-house at 
one time, and were promptly arrested or reported to the Grand 
Jury as disturbers of the peace, by those of " I am better 
than thou " sort of Christians. Such was some of the expe- 
rience this church met with in their early days, though much 
more could be written of their trials and the obloquy in which 
they suffered. However, all religions thrive under persecu- 



274 HISTORY OF WAYNE COUNTY. 

tion, and the softening hands of time, and a truer and better 
faith came to their relief. They were not quite so bad as thej. 
had been painted. 

The names of the ministers who gave the church its first 
impulse were the Revs. H. F. Miller, D. R. Biddlecome and 
\V. S. Bacon, and the members of the church who stood by 
it and encouraged the good work were J. M. Bulla, Smith 
Dudley, Zachariah Osborn; and among the noble women were 
Anna E. Danby, Tracy Osborn, Nancy Bulla, Melissa Grimes, 
and Sarah Johnston. These were not all who espoused the 
cause of the church, but it was all that came to the memory of 
our informant. But others, both men and women, did their 
part to advance the interests and the building up of their 
church. With such leaders the church did not long want for a 
prompt organization and a church edifice of their own. 

At a meeting at Masonic Hall, in February, 1868, the 
first move looking to an organization and the building of a 
church was made, and $1,005 was subscribed then and there. 
With this sum as a starting point, a committee was appointed 
to superintend the building of a church edifice, and was 
composed of the following named gentlemen: J. M. Bulla, 
Z. Osborn and Samuel Moore. 'A Board of Trustees was 
also elected, comprising Smith Druley, Wra. G. Searing and 
J. M. Bulla. 

Under the control of the above committee and trustees a 
fine brick edifice was erected, at a cost of $4,100. The first 
sermon was preached by the Rev. H. F. Miller, on Friday 
preceding the second Sunday in May, and on May 9 this 
church was dedicated to the service of the Most High, the 
sermon being eloquently delivered by the Rev. W. S. Bacon, 
assisted by the Rev. D. R. Biddlecome in the service. Thus, 
afcer many trials, a haven of rest was found. Universalism 
had a home of its own. 

At the close of the service on Sunday, July 11, 1870, the 
church organization was effected under the call of Rev. H. F. 
Miller. Those who remained and became members were: Bros. 
Smith Dudley, Zachariah Osborn, Dr. W. H. Evans, Rev. 
Frank Evans, Rev. T. C. Druley, Samuel Oler, Jacob Flush and 
J. M. Bulla ; Sisters Nancy Bulla, Anna E. Druley, Tracy 



BOSTON TOWNSHIP. 275 

Osborn, Susan B. Stanley, Nancy A. Evans, Melissa Grimes, 
Mary C. Evans, Tabitha Oler and Sue B. Evans. A consti- 
tution and by-laws were adopted, and the First Universalist 
Chnrch of Boston became a permanent organization. 

The officers were: Smith Drnley, Moderator; Dr. W. H. 
Evans, Clerk; Susan B. Stanley, Treasurer, and Samuel Oler 
and W. H. Evans, Deacons. The Trustees were Zachariah 
Osborn and J. M. Bulla. 

BOSTON. 

This village is located on four sections, Nos. 2, 3, 34 and 35, 
and is about one mile from the Union County line on the 
south, and the Ohio State line on the east. It is a small 
village, not yet incorporated, and not destined to be a place 
of note. It has a line turnpike road to Kichmond, some seven 
miles distant, and the principal business is transacted there. 
" Young's History " gives the following: 

The lirst merchant is supposed to have been a McMaster. 
According to the recollection of early settlers, the following 
succeeded McMaster, very nearly in the order named: James 
Iliff, Baxter & Dunham, Jacob W. Fisher and Wm. Fonts, 

Bull & Haines, Wm. and John Russey, Irvin. From 1839 

to 1845 the following are on record as having paid for store 
licenses: In 1839, Doughty &Widup, Joseph F. Chapman, 
Isaac Craig, until 1835 (perhaps later). In 1844 Strattan & 
Burbank, John Strattan. In 1844 and 1845, Harvey & McCul- 
lough, Aaron Drnley. There have also been named, Samuel 
and LeBoy McWhinney, Hiram Bulla & Joseph Druley, Smith 
Druley & John Deal, John Druley, John Steele, Jacob F. 
Rinehart, Robert Swishey & Frank Templeton, David Jenks, 
Jacob F. Rinehart. The postoffice was established in April, 
1837, and Wm. Rnssell, Jr., was the first Postmaster. 

As far back as 1813 Isaac Conolly laid off a small portion 
of his land into town lots. Kot many were sold. The Dru- 
leys and Stanleys settled near there, and the old Methodist 
Episcopal church, erected of logs, was there even before Mr. 
Conolly laid off his embryo town. Some twenty years later 
James Iliff, Stephen McWhinney, Wm. Druley and Samuel 
Shinn became the proprietors of the land, and platted the 



276 HISTORY OF WAYNE COUNTY. 

town in 1S32, the plat and survey being recorded Aug. 30, 
1832. It also gave these two lodges: 

Downey Lodge^ No. 233, of Free and Accepted Masons was 
oro-anized under a charter granted May 25, 1858. Charter 
Members: Nicholas Druley, W. M.; John H. Stearns, S. W. ; 
Joseph M. Bulla, J. W.; Joseph Clengenpul, S. D.; Joseph 
T. Druley, J. W. ; Louis Pigg, Tyler; J. M. Jones, Secretary. 

E'mehart Lodge, 310, Independent Order of Odd Fellows, 
was organized June 11, 1863. The charter was granted May 
20, -1868, on application of Jacob F. Kinehart, Henry Haw- 
kins,Enos Geary, Philip Schneider, and Charles Corns. First 
officers : Jacob F. Rinehart, N. G. ; Oliver H. Toney, Y. G. ; 
Samuel J. Johnson, Secretary; Henry C. Fonts, Per. Secre- 
tary; Levi G. Druley, Treasurer. 

BIOGRAPHICAL. 

Benjamin Brown, deceased, was born in Burlington 
County, N. J., in May, 1798, a son of Clayton and Elizabeth 
(Satterthvvaite) Brown, of Welsh descent. When twenty- 
one years of age he, with his brother Samuel, left New- Jer- 
sey, and settled in Preble County, Ohio, on land given them 
by their father. He cleared the land and resided there till 
1835, when he sold it, and bought 160 acres in Boston Town- 
ship, Wayne Co., Ind., a part of which is the farm where 
his son-in-law, Edward Timberlake, resides. It was only 
partially cleared, but he improved it, and lived here till his 
death. He was a conscientious, industrious man, and a good 
manager. He was public-spirited, and interested in anything 
that tended toward the upbuilding of the community. He 
was twice married, the first time in Ohio, in 1827, to Mary 
Ann Craig. They had four children, two of whom are liv- 
ing — Clayton P., and Martha B. Timberlake. Isaac 0. and 
Jacob died in childhood. Mrs. Brown died in July, 1838, 
aged twenty-eight years. In the fall of 1840 Mr. Brown 
married Naomi Taylor. They had one child — Hannah E., 
wife of Clarkson Davis. Mr. Brown died Oct. 14, 1879, and 
his wife Oct. 14, 1881, both aged eighty-one years. Both 
were life-long members of the Society of Orthodox Friends. 



BOSTON TOWNSHIP. 277 

J. M. Bulla, President of the Wayne County Historical 
Society, wasborn Dec. 11, 1811, in Wayne County, Ind., and is 
the second son of Thomas and Susannah (Mora) Bulla. He 
had few school privileges, like all children of the early pio- 
neers, but like a tree in barren soil, his mind instinctively found 
and appropriated the nourishment desired. He had a fond- 
ness for history, and after the day's labor his evenings were 
spent in reading. He studied the common English branches, 
and qualified himself to teach school, an occupation in which 
he was very successful. Impelled by a desire, cherished from 
boyhood, he, in 1832 and 1833, applied himself to the study 
of medicine, but not wishing to practice the profession, he 
turned his attention to agriculture, and became a successful 
farmer and stock-raiser. In 1876 Mr. Bulla was elected 
President of the Richmond Horticultural Society, and served 
three years. The same year he was elected Vice-President 
of the State Horticultural Society. He has acquainted him- 
self with fruit-growing, both practically and scientifically. 
In August, 1842, he was elected Commissioner of Wayne 
County, and was re-elected in 1845, thus serving six years. 
While serving as County Commissioner he purchased the 
farm where the asylum stands, and lifted the first shovel of 
dirt from the place where the first building was located. He in- 
troduced a radical change in the manner of conducting the man- 
agement of that institution, and the treatment of the inmates. 
His humane disposition peculiarly fitted him for the over- 
sight of the unfortunate class that had to be provided for by 
public charity. In 1850 Mr. Bulla was chosen to represent 
Wayne County in the Legislature, and served two terms ot 
one year each. He served both terms on the Committee of 
Elections, and other important committees, and was the 
author of several bills that passed both Houses. He was an 
earnest advocate of woman suffrage, and urged the right of 
enfranchising women. He has always taken a decided in- 
terest in the various temperance reforms, from the earliest to 
the present prohibition movement. In 1844 he was the first 
man in Boston Township to join the Washingtonian Society. 
The same vear he became a member of the Sons of Tern- 



278 HISTORY OF WAYNE COUNTY. 

perance, and filled all the offices in that order. He united 
with the Masonic fraternity in 1853, and has taken the chap- 
ter degrees. He has filled the principal chairs of the lodge. 
He has for many years been a prominent member of the 
Universalist church — was one of the first in his vicinity to 
advocate the final triumph of good over evil. In politics he 
was formerly a Whig, and became a Republican on the or- 
<yanization of that ])arty. When the war of the Rebellion, with 
its efforts to destroy the best Government in the world, broke 
out he gave freely of his means to crush out treason, and was 
for some time engaged in the service of the Government. 
In years gone by Mr. Bulla was actively engaged in politics, 
and even now takes a deep interest in the political affairs of 
the country. He is well informed on the topics of the day, 
public-spirited, upright, honest and industrious. Those who 
know him best respect and admire him the most. In the 
Legislature he exerted a marked influence, and his efforts be- 
fore the Horticultural Society have proved him possessed of 
literary ability. Some of his letters are worthy of special 
notice — among them an essay on "Agriculture and its In- 
fluence," delivered in February, 1876, and published in the 
agricultural papers in this State and Ohio; a paper on "What 
Destroyed the Pre-historic American?" a very able pro- 
duction upon which he spent much thought and research; his 
last annual address before the society, which was of scientific 
character, and was published with the proceedings of the 
State Horticultural Society. April 17, 1834, Mr. Bulla was 
married to Nancy Wilson, of Franklin County, by whom he 
has eleven children, all married and settled near him except 
one, who lives in Indianapolis. Several of them have been 
successful teachers. He has gained a competency by wise 
management and steady application to one pursuit. With- 
out the aid of school or college he has acquired a large fund 
of knowledge, qualifying him to discharge the duties of va- 
rious offices with ability. Possessing a mind that would have 
enabled him to succeed in any of the professions, he has given 
his thought and care to that part of the world's work that 
creates the material wealth of the country, and belongs to 



BOSTON TOWNSHIP. 279 

that eminently useful and much-to-be-respected class, the 
farmer. 

J, P. Burgess was born in Augusta County, Ya., Sept. 27, 
1801, a son of John and Jane (Irvin) Burgess, natives of 
Virginia, who removed to Springfield, Ohio, in 1815, where 
they died, the former in 1816 and the latter in 1830. In 1818, 
when seventeen years of age, he came to Wayne County, and 
located in Salisbury. He was married March 21, 1821, to 
Theresa, daughter of Peter and Martha Weaver, natives of 
Virginia, who settled in Wayne County in 1807. Soon after 
his marriage he settled on the place where he now lives, 
buying at the time ten acres at $10 an acre. He worked at 
his trade for many years and gained a comfortable competency. 
He was elected Justice of the Peace, and served in that ca- 
pacity thirty-five years. He was one of the most popular 
magistrates in the county. He ofiiciated at nearly 150 mar- 
riages, and has lived to attend the golden wedding of one of 
the couples. He has been a member of the Methodist Epis- 
copal church since thirteen years of age, and has been an en- 
thusiastic worker in both church and Sunday- school'. After 
a married life of fifty-seven years, his wife died Feb. 7, 1878, 
aged seventy-five years and two months. They had no 
children, but reared several adopted children, two of whom 
still live with Mr. Burgess. He gave them a good educa- 
tion, and one is a leading educator of Indiana. 

E. B. Dillman, Justice of the Peace, is a native of Preble 
County, Ohio, born in 1842. His early life was passed on the 
farm, and in the public schools. In 1867 he came to Boston 
and engaged in farming, and later in the mercantile business, 
and but recently disposed of his stock. He enlisted in 1864 in 
Company D, One Hundred and Fifty-sixth Ohio Infantry, 
and served four months. In 1879 he was elected Justice of 
the Peace, and is still an incumbent of that ofiice. He was 
elected Constable of the township in 1875, and served sev- 
eral terms. He received the commission of Postmaster of 
Boston, during President Garfield's administration, and 
served till Sept. 30, 1838. He was married Nov. 24, 1868, to 
Martha, daughter of William Miller. 



280 mSTOKY OF WAYNE COUNTY 

Dennis Druley, farmer, section 35, Boston Township, 
Wayne Co., Ind., was born in Union County, Ind., Jan. 1, 
1816, a son of Nicholas and Sarah (Stanley) Druley. He has 
always followed the v^oeation of a farmer, and now has one of 
the finest farms in the county, owning 380 acres, all well im- 
proved. He was married in 1838 to JSIancy J., daughter of 
"William and Effie (Meeker) Grimes, who died July 5, 1849, 
ao^ed twenty-seven years. They had three children — Martha 
J., wife of Ed. Dalby, of Richmond; Levi G., and Mary E., 
widow of Marshall Henry. Jan. 8, 1850, Mr. Druley mar- 
ried Mary J., daughter of Benjamin Watson, of Henry 
County, Ind. They had four children — Nicholas B., George 
L,, Clement D. and Sarah E., the latter deceased. Mrs. 
Drulej^ died May 2, 1879, aged forty-nine years. Sept. 21, 
1880, Mr. Druley married Mary C. (Wintermute) Hoover, of 
Darke County, Ohio, born Oct. 19, 1835. Mr. and Mrs. 
Druley are members of the Christian church. He was for- 
merly a member of the Methodist Episcopal church. Politi- 
cally, he is a Democrat, and cast his first Presidential vote for 
Martin Yan Buren 

Johii Druley^ farmer, postofiice, Boston, was born March 
9, 1818, a son of Nicholas and Sarah Druley. He was mar- 
ried Aug. 6, 1839, to Nancy, daughter of Stephen Hunt, and 
located two miles south of Boston, on a farm. He subse- 
quently engaged in the mercantile business in Boston, and 
from there moved to what is now known as Kitchel's Corner, 
six miles north of Liberty, then called Bennett's Corner, and 
was called Druleysburg, in honor of Mr. Druley. He con- 
tinued in business there several years, and then moved to 
Cumberland, Marion Co., Ind. Selling out his stock in Cum- 
berland, he bought what was known as the Barton-Wyat 
farm (240 acres), two miles southeast of Boston, on the line of 
Wayne and Union counties. He now owns one of the finest 
fruit farms in the State. In 1878 it yielded 2,000 bushels of 
apples and in 1881, 1,500 bushels. He is one of the 
most enterprising men of the township. His wife died 
July '21, 1849. They had a family of three children— Catha- 
rine E., W. S. and Lafayette (deceased). Dec. 23, 1849, Mr. 



BOSTON TOWNSHIP. 281 

Druley married Eliza J., daughter of Uzel Church. To them 
were born six children — Mary A., Laura A., Joseph E., Ver- 
lin E., Oliver H., and an infant (deceased). Eliza Druley 
died Dec. 30, 1871. July 24, 1881, :Mr. Druley married 
Lizzie H., daughter of William Bell. Mr. Druley is one of 
the oldest members of the Methodist church at Boston, and 
is an active worker in the church. He is a Class-leader, 
Steward and Trustee, and Superintendent of the Sunday- 
school. He was for five years Vice-President of the Town- 
ship Sunday-school Association. 

Levi Druley, deceased, was born in Guilford County, N. 
C, in 1808, a son of Nicholas Druley. When he was three 
years of age his parents came to Wayne County, Ind., and 
here he was reared and educated. He was married in 1833 
to Agnes, daughter of Richard and Sarah (Hunt) Sidg^ick, 
To them were born ten children, seven of whom are living — 
Richard S., William P., Mary E., John, Frank, Martha P., 
and Stephen A. D. The deceased are — Nicholas, Sarah and 
Thomas J. Mr. Druley died Nov. 1, 1882. He was very 
prosperous in business and left his family good homes. He 
was a member of Downey Lodge, No. 233, A. P. & A. M, 
He was no aspirant for office, but served his township as 
Trustee and other minor offices. Mrs. Druley 's father, 
Richard Sidgwick, was a native of England, and when a 
young man came to the United States and located in Marion 
County, Ind. He married Sarah, daughter of Charles and 
Prancina Hunt, old settlers of Wayne County. They had a 
family of seven children — Charles, Prancina, Agnes, Mary, 
John, Matthew, and Mary (deceased). Mr, Sidgwick died in 
1849. 

Levi G. Druley^ farmer, Boston Township, was born in 
this township Dec. 23, 1843, a son of Dennis Druley. He was 
reared a farmer and received his education in the district 
school. He now owns eighty acres of excellent land, near 
Boston, which he has under a good state of cultivation. He 
was married Sept. 10, 1868, to Anna B., daughter of Joseph 
M. Bulla, Sr., of Boston Township. They have four chil- 
dren — Mary Josephine, Arthur L., George Horace and 
19 



282 HISTORY OF WAYNE COUNTY. 

Charley E. Mr. Druley is a member of R'leinliart Lodge, 
No. 310, I. O. 0. F. Politically, he is a Democrat. 

Nathan Druley^ farmer, Boston Township, was born in 
Union County, Ind., Ddc. 12, 1S15, a son of Samuel and 
Nancy Ann (Stanley) Druley. He was reared on a pioneer 
farm, receiving but a limited education. Feb. 8, 1838, he 
married Nancy P., daughter of Isaac an^ Mary Meek, old 
Ecttlers of Wayne County. He rented land two years and 
then bought some land in the eastern part of this township, 
and, with the exception of t^vo years spent in Union County, 
has since lived in Wayne County. He now owns 345 acres 
of excellent land, all well improved, and is one of the thriftiest 
farmers of the township. Mr. and Mrs. Druley have had 
nine children — Isaac E., Nancy M., William H., Joseph S., 
Dennis C. (deceased), Sarah E., Mary J., Nathan S, and 
Luella B. They are among the oldest members of the Method- 
ist Episcopal church, of Boston. 

Smith Druley^ farmer, Harrison Township, Union Co., 
Ind., was born June 14, 1818, on the farm where he now re- 
sides, a son of Samuel and Nancy Druley. He received no 
education in his youth. When eighteen years of age he be- 
gan learning the tailor's trade, in Richmond, and worked at 
his trade fourteen years. In 1850 he returned to the farm 
and lived there till 1853. From 1853 till 1862 he was engaged 
in the mercantile business, in Richmond and Boston, but 
since the latter year has devoted his time to farming. He 
was married in 1841 to Anni E., daughter of Owen and Leah 
Evans, of Pennsylvania. They have had eight children — 
Thaddeus C, Edwin E., Theodore S., Louisa C, Lawrence 
A., Stella C, and Elmer M., and Owen (deceased). Thaddeus 
C. enlisted in 1862 in the three months' service and after 
his discharge enlisted for three years in Company C, Ninth 
Indiana Cavalry. He was captured while on a scouting ex- 
pedition in the vicinity of Franklin, Tenn., and was confined 
in Andersonville Prison several months. He is now pastor 
of the Universalist church, at Muncie, Ind. Edwin E. en- 
listed in 1864, in Company B, Thirty-seventh Indiana In- 
fantry, and served one year. Mr. Druley is one of the most 



BOSTON TOWNSHIP. 283 

influential men of his township. He owns 160 acres of land, 
all well improved. Politically he is a Republican. 

James Endsley was born in Hamilton County, Ohio, Oct. 
22, 1805, a son of John and Ellen (Golden) Endsley, natives 
of South Carolina. His grandfather, Andrew Endsley, was 
a native of Ireland, and came to America in 1758, and settled 
in Maryland. He was a soldier in the war of the Revolution, 
and after its close removed to South Carolina. In 1805 John 
Endsley removed to Indiana and settled in Wayne County, 
leaving the South on account of his antipathy to slavery, and 
in 1808 Andrew Endsley and the rest of his family followed 
him to Indiana and located in Abington Township, entering 
land from the Government. Andrew Endsley died in 1826, 
and his wife, Jane Endsley, died in 1810. They had a family 
often children, all of whom came to Indiana. John Endsley 
died Oct. 16, 1838, and his wife in 1866. They had a family 
of three children — James, Jane and John, all deceased. 
James Endsley was married Nov. 26, 1883, to Hannah, 
daughter of James and Sarah Martin. They had eight chil- 
dren — Sarah, Elleanor, John, Amanda (deceased), Jacob S. 
Stephen G., Mary E. and Hannah Ann. Politically Mr. 
Endsley was always a Democrat. He was a member of 
the Elkhorn Baptist church. Mr. Endsley died very suddenly, 
Feb. 1, 1884, with heart disease. He was apparently in his 
usual health riding over his farm that day, and in the evening 
rode over to his son's, about a half a mile, and after returning 
home complained of a pain in the region of his heart, and 
died about ten o'clock that night. He was seventy-eight 
years old and had lived in Wayne County longer than any 
other man living at the time of his death. He owned at the 
time of his death 147 acres of good land. 

Isaac M. Esteb, deceased, was born in Wayne County, 
Ind., in 1814, a son of Isaac and Ruth (Moore) Esteb, natives 
of North Carolina, who were among the early settlers of 
Wayne County. They bought the 160 acres of land where 
Mrs. Isaac Esteb now lives. His father was by trade a 
wagon-maker and carried on the business at home. He was 
born in 1762 and died Oct. 18, 1838. His wife was born in 



284 HISTORY OF WAYNE COUNTY. 

1773, and died in April, 1839. They had a family of five 
children— Elizabeth, Nancy, John, Mary and Isaac M., all 
deceased, Isaac M. was married Jan. 25, 1838, to Catherine, 
daughter of Jacob Smelser. They had a family of eight 
children, six of whom are living — Jacob, David, Johan, Jane, 
Elizabeth and Catherine; John and Tracy are deceased. Mr. 
Esteb died jSTov. 14, 1867. He was a member of the Baptist 
church and always took an interest in all religious matters. 
He accumulated a large property and at the time of his death 
was one of the wealthiest farmers of the township. 

William H. Evans, M, i>., son of Dr. David E. Evans, 
was born in Boston, Wayne Co., Ind., Oct. 22, 1839. 
He attended the village schools and subsequently entered 
Miami University, at Oxford, Ohio, where he took a scientific 
course, and graduated in 1861. He then began the study of 
medicine, under his father's direction, and entered the Medi- 
cal Department at Ann Arbor, Mich., graduating in 1865. 
He immediately began the practice of his profession at Boston, 
and has paid exclusive attention to a large and increasing 
practice. In 1862 he assisted his father in his profes- 
sional duties, acting as contract Hospital Steward of the Sixty- 
ninth Indiana Infantry. He has been twice married, the first 
time in 1861:, to Mary, daughter of Dr. James M. Cory, of Ox- 
ford, Ohio. They had three children — Mary, Etta and Cory. 
In 1873 he married Melissa, daughter of Jonathan Toney, of 
Preble County, Ohio. They have two children — Jonathan 
and Frank. 

Stephen Farlow was born in Wayne County, Ind., in 1817, 
a son of John and Catherine (Miller) Farlow. His great- 
grandparents were natives of Pennsylvania, and his grand- 
parents, William and Drusilla Farlow, were natives of North 
Carolina, and came to Indiana in 1807, locating in what is 
now Harrison Township, Union County. They had a family 
of eight children — William, John, G-eorge, Nathan, Samuel, 
Mary, Sarah, and Elizabeth. John Farlow was a single man 
when he came to Indiana. He married Catherine, daughter 
of Christian and Catherine Miller, natives of Tennessee, who 
settled in Indiana in 1807. In 1812 John Farlow was com- 



BOSTON TOWNSHIP. 285 

missioned Captain of a company, and served gallantly in the 
war of 1812. In later life he became connected with the 
Christian church. To him was born a family o fseven chil- 
dren — Martha, Stephen, Eve, Lucinda, George "W., Maria and 
Henrietta. His wife died in 1829, and he subsequently 
married Sidneth (Johnson) Miller. They had five children — 
Thomas R., Mary, Drusilla, Jane and John. Mr. Farlow 
died in 1857, in his seventy-fifch year. Our subject was 
married Oct. 20, 1837, to Kancy, daughter of James Lewi'-.con 
and settled in his native township. In 1853 he removed to 
Centre Township, and in 1862 purchased the farm here he 
now lives. Politically he is a Republican, in 1880 and 
1881 he served as Deputy Assessor ^^' iioston Township, 
and as Assessor in 1882 and 188'^ xie was a member of the 
County Agricultural Board, when it was in existence, and 
has always taken an interest in all matters of importance to 
the township. Mr. and Mrs. Farlow have four children — 
James M., Ma'Vna J ., John H. and William H. They are 
members of the Christian church. 

David Fouts, deceased, was born in Germantown, Ohio, 
Feb. 5, 1804, a son of William and Sarah Fonts, natives of 
North Carolina, who settled in Germantown, Ohio, in an 
early day. When our subject was a child his parents re- 
moved to Wayne County, Ind., and settled on the south- 
western part of section 28, Boston Township. His mother 
died in 1833, aged fifty-six years, and his father Sept. 29, 1848, 
aged sixty-seven years. They had six children — Austin, Nancy, 
Mary, Elizabeth, William and David. William was a mem- 
ber of an Iowa regiment and was killed on the frontier by the 
Indians. David Fouts was married April 8, 1824, to Patsey, 
daughter of John and Rosanna (Hampton) Whitehead. They 
settled on the farm whore Mrs. Fouts and a son now live. 
Mr. Fouts was an enterprising and successful farmer and 
owned over 400 acres of good land, all well improved. He 
was a member of the Methodist Episcopal church. He died 
Jan. 10, 1863. Mrs. Fouts was born Nov. 23, 1807, and is 
now living on the homestead. They had a family of ten 
children; seven are living — Mary J., now Mrs. Stanley; 
Oliver H.; Sarah Ann, now Mrs. Ganz; Rosanna, now Mrs. 



286 HISTORY OF WAYNE COUNTY. 

Jenks; Catherine, now Mrs. Crane; Henrj C. and Charles C. 
William, John and Milton are deceased- Mrs. Fouts's parents 
came from iS"orth Carolina in 1805 or 1806, and settled on the 
southwest quarter of section 31, Boston Township, Wayne 
County, Ind., but subsequently removed to La Porte, Ind. 
Her father was a prominent man of the county, and served 
as Sherift' a number of years. He was a member of the 
Baptist church, and was one of the founders of that church 
in ii'.h part of the State. His father, Lazarus Whitehead, 
was tho first minister of the Baptist church in this locality. 
The chiiv ;?n of Lazarus and Fatsey Whitehead were — Lazarus, 
William, Isaav-.^v^ohn, Folly and Fatsey. John Whitehead 
died in La Forte, L.u. in 1842, aged fifty-nine years. His 
wife died in this tovvnshlj. '^'^•t. 20, 1809, aged twenty-six 
years. 

Larkiii Gaar was born in Culpeper County, Ya., Dec. 4, 
1800, a son of Abraham and Dinah (Weaver) Gaar, natives 
of Virginia, of German descent. In 1804 ' \s parents re- 
moved to Kentucky, and in the spring of 1807 to Wayne 
Co., Ind., and entered 160 acres of land from the Govern- 
ment. His mother died Sept. 26, 1834, aged nearly sixty- 
seven years, and his father Aug. 20, 1861, aged ninety-two 
years. They had a family of nine children, four of whom 
are living — Abel, residing 'in Michigan; Martha, wife of 
Jeptha Turner; Eliza Henderson, of Iowa, andLarkin. Jonas, 
Fielding, Fanny, Rosa and an infant are deceased. Jonas 
and Fielding were soldiers in the war of 1812. Larkin Gaar 
has lived where he now resides since he was seven years ot 
age, his parents remaining with him till their death. He 
owns 193 acres of fine land, 160 acres of it being the old 
homestead. He was married to Sarah, daughter of David 
and Sarah Railsback, who located near Abington, Wayne 
County, in 1806. They had a family of six children, four of 
whom are living — Alvira, David, Monroe and Jonas. Nathan 
died' at the age of sixteen years, and Abraham aged eighteen 
years. Mrs. Gaar died in 1857. Folitically Mr. Gaar has 
always been a Democrat. 

Sylvester Glrtori was born in Boston Township, Wayne 
Co.. Ind., in 1818, a son of Jeremiah and Jane (Moore) 



BOSTON TOWNSHIP. 287 

Girton, his father a native of Maryland, and his mother 
of Kentucky. His parents were amon^ the earliest settlers 
of Boston Township. In early life they were members of 
the United Brethren church, but subsequentl}'^ joined the 
Methodist Episcopal church. They had a family of eight 
children, three of whom are living — Felix, Sylvester and 
Levi. John, Isaiah, Benjamin, Elijah and Sarah are deceased. 
The father died May 23, 1845, aged seventy-five years, and 
the mother, Dec. 23, 1871, aged ninety-nine years, five months 
and twenty-two days. Oar subject was reared on a farm, re- 
ceiving but a limited education. He was married in 1840 to 
Julia Ann, daughter of James and Mary Bowles, of Preble 
County, Ohio, and soon after settled on the farm where he 
now resides, and has followed farming with the exception of 
three years he was in the mercantile business in Boston. Mr. 
and Mrs. Girton had a family of eight children, five of whom 
are living — Mary J., William, Thomas, Anna and Alonzo. 
Louisa, Narcissa and Robert F. are deceased. Mrs. Girton 
died June 25, 1857, aged thirty-eight years. In 1875 Mr. 
Girton married Maria, widow of William Esteb, and daughter 
of Jacob and Susanna Seaney. They have one child — Ada. 
Mrs. Girton was married to William Esteb Dec. 21, 1851. He 
was born Dec. 5, 1826, and died Dec. 29, 1863. They had 
a family of four children — Franklin P., Jacob C, Elizabeth 
E., and Stephen (deceased). Mr. Girton owns a good farm of 
ninety-three acres. He and his wife are members of the 
Methodist Episcopal church. 

1< rancis Hendrix was born in Wayne County, Ind., in 
1832, a son of George and Elizabeth (Bailey) Hendrix, his 
father a native of Kentucky and his mother of Ohio. His 
parents came to Wayne County in early life and resided here 
and in Union County till the father's death in 1858. The 
mother is still living at an advanced age. Our subject was 
reared on a farm and received but a limited education in the 
subscription school. He was obliged to rely on his own 
energy and ability as soon as old enough to work. He was 
married in 1860 to Sarah Ann Ray, daughter of William and 
Sarah (McClain) Ray, and soon after settled in Randolph 
County, where he bought a farm and lived five yeare. He 



28S HISTORY OF WAYNE COUNTY. 

then sold his farm and bought 176 acres in Boston Township, 
Wayne County, where he now resides. Mr. and Mrs. Hen- 
drix have four diildren— William F., John W., Lewis E.and 
Anna May. They are members of the German Baptist 
church. 

John W. Hort was born in Wayne Township, Wayne 
Co., Ind., in 1836. His father, John C. Hort, was born in 
Germany in 1Y95, a son of Martin Hort, who died on ship- 
board while en route to the United States, in 1818, and was 
buried on an island in the Atlantic Ocean. The family settled 
in Delaware. In 1821 John 0. accompanied William Sid- 
ham and family to Wayne County, and located three miles 
northeast of Richmond. He worked as a f-irm hand for Jesse 
Clark three years and in the meantime married Mary, daugh- 
ter of Jesse Clark, and subsequently settled on land given him 
by his father-in-law, residing there till his death in March, 
185S. His wife died in 1817. He and his wife were mem- 
bars of the Methodist Episcopal church. They had a family 
of twelve children; only two are living — JohnW. and Margaret, 
wife> of George Cramer, of Butler County, Ohio. Teresa, 
Hannah, Mary Ann, Elizabeth, Apollono, Catherine, Jesse M., 
Thomas E., George W. and William H ar^; dec3a3ed. George 
enlisted in Company A, Sixty-ninth Indiana Infantry, in 
1862; was in the battle of Richmond and several battles near 
tlie Mississippi and died at St. Louis, April 10, 1863. Will- 
iam H. enlisted in Company A, One Hundred and Thirty- 
third Indiana Infantry, in 1864; died at Louisville, Aug. 17, 
1864. John W. was reared on the old home farm. In 
October, 1861, he enlisted in Company C, Fifty-seventh 
Indiana Infantry, for three years, and re-enlisted in 1864, 
serving till the close of the war. He enlisted as a private 
and was promoted for meritorious conduct to First Lieutenant 
and afterward to Captain of the company. He participated 
in the battles of Shiloh, Perryville, Stone River, Mission 
Ridge, Franklin, Chattanooga, Atlanta and the campaign 
against Hood. He was discharged Djc. 14, 1865. After his 
return home he settled on the home farm, and three years 
later purchased 160 acres in Boston Township, on a part of 
which he still resides. He was married in March, 1866, to 



BOSTON TOWNSHIP. • 289 

Martha Sherry. They have four children— Mary E., Iva I., 
Lena L and Ethel E. 

Eli Kilmer was born in Berkley County, Ya., June 5, 
1827, a son of Henry and Elizabeth (Sibert) Kilmer, natives 
of Pennsylv^ania, who located in Virginia, and subsequently, 
in 1840, in Wayne County. They had a family of twelve 
children, eleven of whom came to "Wayne County and 
ten of whom are living — Daniel, John, Henry, Mary, Eli, 
George, William, Barbara, Thomas and Ann. Catherine 
and Elizabeth are deceased. Mr. Kilmer died in 1857- 
Mrs. Kilmer was born March 22, 1795, and died at the 
age of fifty-five years, two months and eighteen days. Our 
subject was reared a farmer, and in 1857 married Mrs. Han- 
nah Hart, widow of George Hart. They have seven children 
— Elizabeth, Howard, George, Daniel, Charles, Etta May, 
and Mary E. Mrs. Kilmer's first husband's father, Daniel 
Hart, was a native of North Carolina, and came to this county 
with his wife and one child and settled on the place where 
Francis Hendrix now resides. He had a family of ten chil- 
dren — Sarah, Elizabeth, William, James, John, Melinda, 
George, Isaac, Rebecca and Samuel. George married Han- 
nah, daughter of John Roper, Feb. 12, 1852. He died April 
27, 1856, leaving two children — John W., and William S., a 
resident of Iowa. 

Justus Krouskoff^ farmar, section 21, Boston Township, 
was born in Butler County, Ohio, April 24, 1832, a son of 
Louis and Catherine Krouskofi", natives of Germany, his fa- 
ther born in 1780 and his mother in 1790. They came to 
America in 1819, and located in Cincinnati, and subsequently 
removed to Batler County, Ohio, where the father died in 
1860, and. the mother in 1866. Of their eight children Jus- 
tus is the only one living in Wayne County, Ind. He was 
educated in the common schools and then entered the Farm- 
ers' College near Cincinnati, where he graduated in 1855, teach- 
ing in the meantime to defray his expenses. He taught school 
till 1865, a part of the time in the district schools and a part 
of the time was principal of graded schools. In 1865 he re- 
moved to Richmond and was engaged in the drug business 
till 1868, when he sold his stock and purchased the farm 



29fO HISTORY OF WAYNE COUNTY. 

where he now lives. He has eighty acres of well-improved 
land. In 1804 he enlisted in Company I, One Hundred and 
Thirty eighth Ohio Infantry, and served four months. He 
was married Jan. 20, 1863, to Kocilla, daughter of F. S. 
Bowen, of Hamilton County, Ohio. They have four children 
— Kate, Ollie, Charles and Francis. Politically Mr. Krous- 
koff is a Republican. 

F. M. Lamb was born in Centre, now Boston, Township, 
Wayne Co., Ind., in 1833, a son of John and Catherine 
(Boone) Lamb. His grandfather, James Lamb, was a native 
of Perthshire, Scotland, and when twenty years of age, in 
1776, came to the United States, and after participating in 
the war of the Revolution settled in Bourbon County, Ky., 
where he married Hannah, daughter of Joseph Boone. In 
1811 he removed to Indiana and settled near the mouth of 
Elkhorn Creek, in Abington Township, "Wayne County. He 
bought 1,440 acres of land for which he paid $2 an acre. He 
was a member of the Christian church. He had a family of 
nine children — Anna, James, William, John, Thomas, Joseph 
B., Elizabeth, Hannah, Jane and Catherine, all deceased but 
Mrs. Jane Spahr, of Abington. Mr. Lamb died in 1841, aged 
eighty-five years, and his wife in 1839, aged seventy years. 
He was a strong anti-slavery man, and left Kentucky on ac- 
connt of the evil influences of slavery. His son, John Lamb, 
was born in Kentucky in 1802. He married Catherine, 
daughter of William Boone, in Butler County, Ohio, and 
shortly after settled in Boston Township. They were zealous 
members of the Methodist Episcopal church. To them were 
born nine children; but four are living — Mrs. Sarah Owens, 
F. M. and T. J., of Boston, and Hannah, wife of Obadiah 
Holler, of Union County, Ind. James, John, Stephen, John 
W. and Almira are deceased. Mr. Lamb died in 1860, aged 
fifty-eight years, and his wife in 1880, in the seventy-third 
year of her age. Our subject, F. M. Lamb, was reared a 
farmer, and his advantages for an education were meager, 
lie was married in 1857 to Rachel, daughter of Tiiomas Laws. 
They have had a family often children — Thomas, William, 
Joseph, Harry, John W. and Frankie (deceased), Althea, 
Margaret, Mary and Mattie (twins). Mr. Lamb owns a fine 
farm of 106 acres, all well improved. 



BOSTON TOWNSHIP. 291 

James Lainh^ deceased, one of the well-known early settlers 
of Wayne County, was a native of Scotland and came to this 
country when a young man. He first settled in Kentucky, 
where he married Hannah Boone, a relative of Daniel 
Boone. In 1812 he came to Wayne County and settled in 
the northeastern part of Abington Township, entering a 
large tract of land from the Government. He was in 
good circumstances when he came, and by judicious man- 
agement became one of the wealthiest men of the county. 
He was a soldier in the war of 1812. He was a member 
of the !New Light church and his wife was a member 
of the Baptist church. Their children were James, Mrs. 
Elizabeth Hunt, William, Mrs. Catherine Hunt, John, Joseph 
B., Mrs. Jane Spahr, Anna and Thomas, all deceased except 
Mrs. Spahr, who resides at Abington, aged seventy-five years. 
John, son of James Lamb, was born in Kentucky in 1800. 
He married Catherine, daughter of William Boone, of Ham- 
ilton County, Ohio, and settled on land in the southwestern 
part of Centre Township. He was a prosperous and highly 
respected citizen of the county. He and his wife were mem- 
bers of the Methodist Episcopal church. He was a liberal, 
public-spirited man, always doing all in his power to pro- 
mote the welfare of the county. Nine children were born to 
him, four of whom are living — Sarah, Francis M., Thomas J. 
and Hannah J. James W., Stephen, Elmira, John W. and 
Anna C. are deceased. James W. married Mary E. Mackie. 
They had five children — John F., Mary C, Charles, Clara J. 
and James P. Hannah J. married Obadiah Holler, of Union 
County, Ind., and has five children — Francis M., William, 
Emma D., Clara M. and John H. Sarah married J. T. Ow- 
ens and has had five children — Anna C, John (deceased), 
Edgar E., Tillie J., Willis E. and Wilber W. (twins). Fran- 
cis M. married Kachel E. Laws and has had ten children — 
John W. (deceased), Thomas J., William H., Joseph x\., 
Harry, Frank (deceased), Altha C, Margaret E., Martha and 
Mary (twins). Thomas J. married Mary E. Alender and has 
four children — Annie L,, William, Hannah C. and Ella. 

James McLain was born in Greenup County, Ky., Sept. 
16, 1810, a son of Archibald and Elioda (Dewey) McLain, 



292 HISTORY OF WAYNE COUNTY. 

natives of Pennsylvania and Maryland. His parents after 
their marriai^e removed to Kentucky, and subsequently to 
Meio-s County, Ohio, and from there came to Wayne County, 
Ind., and settled two miles east of Kichmond. They after- 
ward removed to Delaware County, Ind., where Mrs. Mc- 
Lain died Sept. 1, 1853, and Mr. McLain May 4, 1857. They 
had a family of eleven children, of whom nine came to this 
county — Jane, Sarah, John, James, Phasbe, Cassandra, Will- 
iam, Charles and Archibald. Susana and Isabelle died be- 
fore the family came to Wayne County. James and Sarah 
(Mrs. Ray) are the only members of the family residing in 
the county. James McLain was twenty years of a^e when 
his parents came to this county. He was married in 1833 to 
Disa, daughter of Nathaniel Wasson. Mr. McLain cast his 
first vote for General Jackson, but afterward voted with the 
Whig party till the organization of the Republican party, and 
since then has voted with that party. He has a good farm of 
forty acres on Elkhorn Creek. 

Isaac Meek, deceased, was a native of Kentucky and a son 
of Jacob and Nancy (Warcins) Meek, who removed from Ma- 
ryland to Kentucky and thence, in 1805 or 1806, to Wayne 
County, Ind., and settled in Wayne Township a mile south 
of Richmond, and subsequently moved to Boston Township, 
where the father died in 18i3 and the mother several years 
later. There was a family of eight children — John, Mar- 
tha, Effie, Ruah, William, Isaac, Jeremiah and Joshua. 
The latter died prior to the removal of the family from Ken- 
tucky. Isaac Meeks was reared in Kentucky and was mar- 
ried there to Mary Perkins. They accompanied his parents 
to Indiana, and some years later removed to Illinois, where 
the wife died. They had a family of eight children — John, 
Joseph, William, Allen, Alfred, Nancy P. , Ellinor and Mary 
J. Nancy P., now Mrs. Nathan Druley, is the only one liv- 
ing. After the death of his wife Mr. Meek returned to Indi- 
ana and settled in Fountain County, where he died. He 
married Mary (Grimes) Davidson, by whom he had one child 
— Armstrong. 

William Miller was born on the farm where he now lives 
in 1814, a son of John and Christina (Kissling) Miller, who 



BOSTON TOWNSHIP. 293 

came from Virginia in 1812 and located where our subject 
now lives. They had a family of nine children Eve, Ro- 
sanna, Susanna, Sarah, Elizabeth, Mary, Catherine, Pho3be 
and William. The father died in 1822 and the mother in 
1860. Oar subject is the only one of the family now living. 
He was reared in his native county, but his advantages for 
an education were limited, as he was early thrown on his 
own resources by the death of his father. He has been an 
industrious farmer and has accumulated a good property. 
He has been a member of the Methodist Episcopal church 
since seventeen years of age, and has been a Class-leader since 
nineteen years of age, with the exception of the four years 
during the war of the Rebellion. He is one of the oldest 
members of the Boston church, and one of its most zealous 
workers. Politically he is a Democrat. He was married 
Dec. 19, 1833, to Mary Ann, daughter of John and Frances 
Brattain. To them have been born seven children, four of 
whom are living — Frances, wife of J. S. Moore; Martha, 
wife of E. B. Dillman ; John W. and Elizabeth J. Mary Ann, 
Christina and Rebecca are deceased. 

Bev. Alfred B. Moore, eldest son of John and Sarah 
Moore, was born in Wayne County, Ind., in 1826. His edu- 
cational advantages were limited, but since reaching man- 
hood he has applied himself to study and is now one of the 
best informed men of the township. After attaining his ma- 
jority he began life for himself by farming, and now owns 
120 acres of well-improved land. In 1860 he entered the 
ministry of the German Baptist church, and when at home 
has charge, in association with others, of a church in Preble 
County, Ohio. A portion of his time has been spent in 
traveling in the interest of the church. Mr. Moore was mar- 
ried in 1849 to Rebecca Ann, daughter of William and Ra- 
chel Druley. To them have been born ten children — -Elvira 
(wife of A. Witter), Rufus R., William A., John A,. Sarah E. 
(wife ofA. Gordon), Warren E., Rachel J., Charles, Elizabeth 
and Walter. 

Jacob S. Moore, farmer, section 32, Boston Township, was 
born Dec. 31, 1831, a son of John and Sarah Moore. He was 
reared a farmer, and now owns a fine farm adjoining the old 



294 HISTORY OF WAYNE COUNTY. 

homestead. He was married Feb. 20, 1851, to Christina, 
daughter of William and Marj^ A. Miller. They had a family 
of six children— John F., jMary F., William E., Sarah A. 
(deceased), Douglas E. and Cora C. Mrs. Moore died April 
13 1863, aged twenty-six years and nine months. March 
17 1861, Mr. Moore married Frances Miller, a sister of his 
first wife. They had four children, but one of whom is living 

George B. Jennie, Charles and Anna are deceasedr Mr. 

and Mrs. Moore are members of the Methodist Episcopal 
church. 

Jo/m i/6)<?rg, deceased, was born in Surry County, N. C. , 
Jan. 10, 1795, a sonof Joal Moore, and when fifteen years of 
ao-e came with his parents to Indiana. He was married Sspt. 
22, 1825, to Sarah, daughter of Josiah and Kebacca (Lewis) 
Elston. Three months after his marriage he rented a farm, 
but subsequently purchased it and resided there till his 
death. He was a successful business man and accumulated 
considerable property. He died March 22, 1882. Mr. 
and Mrs. Moore had a family of thirteen children, six of 
whom are living — Alfred, Joel, Lucy J., widow of Joseph 
Schrackengast; Jacob; Maria, wife of Augustus Weller; and 
Sarah, wife of James F. Hawkins. The deceased are: Elston, 
John, Thomas, William, Ellen, Isaac, and Lycurgus. David 
O., son of Lycurgus Moore, was left an orphan in childhood 
and has made his grandparents' house his home. Mrs. 
Moore's parents came to Wayne County from Tennessee in 
1811, and settled on section 6, Boston Township. Of a 
family of thirteen children, Mks. Sarah Moore is the only 
one living. Those deceased are — Mary, Jesse, Josiah 
Hester, Kebecca, an infant, Amelia, Nancy, Micajah, Lucy, 
John and William. Mrs. Elston died in 1819, and Mr. Els- 
ton afterward married Millie Maberry. He subsequently 
removed to Whitley County, Ind., where he died in 1845, at 
an advanced age. 

Samuel Moore was born on the farm where he now lives 
in 1817, a son of Joel and Mary (Tucker) Moore, natives of 
Korth Carolina. His parents came to Indiana in 1810, arriv- 
ing in Boston Township, Wayne County, Oct. 10 of that 
year. His father entered the northwest quarter of section 



BOSTON TOWNSHIP. 295 

4. He was drafted into the war of 1812, and served a year, 
receiving a land warrant for his services. In 1835 he re- 
moved to Harrison Township, Union Co., lud., where he 
and his wife both died. Thej were m3mb3rs of the Bap- 
tist church. To them were born ten children, three of whom 
are living — George, of Whitley County, Ind. ; James, of Cass 
County, Mich., and our subject. The deceased were — John, 
William, Mrs. Elizabeth Starr, Mrs. Temperance Imel, Mrs. 
Ruth Ann Mercer, Alfred, and Mrs. Mary Stanley. Our 
subject endured all the privations of a pioneer life. While yet 
a boy in years he frequently made trips to Cincinnati with a 
six-horse team to dispose of the products of the farm. He 
has always lived on the old homestead farm, where he owns 
230 acres of excellent land. He also owns 160 acres in 
Harrison Township, Union Co., Ind. Politically he was 
reared in the Democratic school of politics, and has always 
adhered to the principles of that party. He has been twice 
married, the first time Sept. 9, 1838, to Margaret M., daugh- 
ter of Smith and Nancy Jones, natives of Tennessee. They 
had six children, four of whom are living — Mary E., wife of 
Matthew Arbuckle; Nancy C, wife of L. C. Nicholson; Mar- 
garet L., wife of J. W. Salsberry, and Catherine, widow of 
William Starr. James W. and David T. are deceased. Mrs. 
Moore died May 21, 1851, and Oct. 31, 1852, Mr. Moore 
married Mary, daughter of Edmund and Lucy Butt. They 
have four children — Anna E., wife of Jonah Gaar; Lydia A., 
wife of Isaac C. Hunt; Jacob S. and Minnie A. 

David Oshorn, deceased, was born in Suffolk County, N. 
Y., June 29, 1764. He was married June 20, 1791, to Jane 
Greene, who was born Jan. 3, 1767. They had a family of 
eight children, but three of whom are living — Abigail, born 
Jan. 4, 1794; Jane, born Aug. 21, 1802; Emeline, born May 
27, 1807. The deceased are, Daniel, Jr., born May 27, 1792; 
Alonzo, born Sept. 7, 1798; Sivonia, born Aug. 12, 1800; 
Samuel, born July 22, 1805; Chatfield, born Jan. 6, 1809. In 
1821 they came, with their eight children, to Wayne County, 
Ind., and located where their daughter Emeline now lives. 
Mr. Osborn was a good citizen and was widely known and 
respected. He was an industrious, energetic farmer and ac- 



296 HI6T0KY OF WAYNE COUNTr. 

cumulated a good property, lie died May 13, 1846. Mrs. 
Osborn died June 9, 1840. 

Zacharlah Osborn, deceased, was born in Boston Township, 
Wayne Co., Ind., July 19, 1829, and was a son of Daniel Os- 
born, an old settler of the county. His early life was spent 
on the farm and he received his education in the country 
schools. He was married in 1856 to Tracy, daughter of 
Jacob Smelser, and settled on a farm in Union County, Ind. 
In 1860 he purchased the farm where his family now resides. 
He was successful in his business, and left his family in good 
circumstances. He was a member of the Universalist church. 
He died July 24, 1881. To Mr. and Mrs. Osborn were born 
seven children, but four of whom are now living — Foster, 
Charles S., Frank and Mary E. Edward, Jacob and Henry 
are deceased. 

Curtis ParJcs was born in Barren County, Ky., Feb. 11, 
1804, a son of Samuel and Charity (Runyan) Parks, natives 
of New Jersey. They removed to Preble County, Ohio, in 
1806. Our subject was reared on a farm, but when a young 
man learned the cabinet-maker's trade, which he worked at a 
number of years, and subsequently worked at the carpenter's 
trade. In 1827 he removed to Wayne County, Ind., and 
settled on the farm where he now lives, buying at the time 
.seventy acres, afterward increasing it to 160 acres. Mr. 
Parks is one of the oldest members of the Methodist church 
of Boston, and takes an active part in all good works. He 
was married in 1826 to Nancy Frame. They had five chil- 
dren — William, Elizabeth, Posa Ann, John F. and Levi D. 
Mrs. Parks died in 1850, aged forty-five years. July 28, 1860, 
Mr. Parks married Mrs. Sarah (Miner) Holland, widow of 
Asbury Holland. They have four children — Mary E., Albert 
B,, Emma L. and Thomas M. His sons John F. and Levi D. 
enlisted in the fall of 1861 in Company C, Seventy-fifth Ohio 
Infantry, and served three years — John as a. drummer and 
Levi as a titer. Politically Mr. Parks is.a Republican. He 
has served his township as Assessor and Inspector of Elec- 
tions. 

William Ray, deceased, was a native of Ohio, a son of John 
and Sarah Ray, When he was a young man his parents, 



BOSTON TOWNSHIP. 297 

with their children — John, William, Arcliibald, Rhoda, Jane 
and Jackson — removed to Wayne Cjiinty, Ind., and purchased 
land in Boston Township, where the father died J^ov. 4, 1835, 
and the mother, Sept. 1, 1852. Of the family Jackson and 
Rhoda are the only ones living. William Ray married Sarah 
McClain, daughter of Archibald and Rhoda McClain, and 
settled on the homestead, where his family still reside. They 
had a family of ten children, live of whom are living — Sarah 
Ann, Samantha, Lucinda, Phoebe and Celia. Rhoda Jane, 
John Wesley, Chatfield, William Henry and an infant are 
deceased. Mr. Ray died April 9, 1876, aged sixty-nine years. 
Mrs. Ray's parents were natives of Pennsylvania, and were 
among the early settlers of Meigs County, Ohio. About 1832 
they removed to Boston Township, Wayne Co., Ind., and 
soon after to Delaware County, Ind., where her mother died 
Sept. 1, 1853, and her father. May 4, 1857. They had a fam- 
ily of eleven children — John, James, William, Charles, Ar- 
chibald, Susana, Jane, Isabelle, Cassandra, Phoebe and Sarah. 
James and Sarah (Mrs. Ray) are the only ones now living in 
Wayne County. 

Daniel Rife^ deceased, was born in Virginia in 1809, a son 
of John Rife. When he was a child his parents came to 
Wayne County, Ind. He learned the trade of a blacksmith, 
and worked at his trade in Boston in connection with farm- 
ing. He was elected Justice of the Peace in 1842 and served 
five years. He was married Aug. 17, 1838, to Cynthia A. 
Stanley, a native of Union County, Ind., born Oct. 7, 1813, 
and a daughter of Zachariah Stanley. They had a family of 
five children — Dr. J. J., Sarah E., Hester A., James M. and 
Nancy J. Mr. Rife diedJJuly 19, 1840. In 1854 Mrs. Rife 
married William McCoy. They have one son — Robert M. 

Rev. Jacob Rife was born on the farm where he now lives, 
Oct. 17,1826, a sonof John and Frances (Christ) Rife, natives 
of the Shenandoah Valley, Va., who came to Indiana in 1816, 
locating in what is now Union County, and bought the farm 
in Boston Township, Wayne County, where our subject now 
lives. There was a family of six children; only two are liv- 
ing — Jacob and Abraham. Elizabeth, Nancy, Daniel and 
John are deceased. The father died March 1, 1829, in his 
20 



298 HISTORY OF WAYNE COCTNTY. 

fifty s3coiHi year, and the mothor, Aug. 0, 1864, in lier 
eiffhtietli year. Jacob Rife was married Oct. 15, 1846, to 
Esther Stanley, who was born in Union County, Ind., July 
6 1826. They settled on the old homestead farm where they 
still reside. In the fall of 1852 Mr. Rife entered the minis- 
try of the German Baptist, or Brethren, church. lie has 
traveled extensively over the. States of Ohio, Indiana, Illinois, 
Iowa, Kansas, Missouri, Virginia and Arkansas, and has also 
had charge of a church at home. He owns 170 acres of tlie 
homestead farm, which is all under a good state of cnltiva- 
tion. Mr. and Mrs. Rife have had seven children, four of 
whom are living— John M., Elizabeth A., James M. and 
George W. Those deceased arc, Francis M., Franklin E. 
and Rebecca J. The parents of Mrs. Rife, Zacliariah and 
Mary (Bedwell) Stanley, located in Harrison Township, 
Union Co., Ind., in 1812. Mr. Stanley was born Dec. 9, 
1781, and died Oct. 9, 1852, Mrs. Stanley was born July 13, 
1785, and died Feb. 23, 1851. They had a family of fourteen 
children, nine of whom are living — Sarah, Jehu, Cynthia, 
Eliza, Mary, Zachariah, Elizabeth, Joseph and Esther. 
Pleasant, James, Jonathan, Temperance and Martha J. are 
deceased. 

</. J. Rife, M. Z>., was born in Boston, Wayne Co., Ind., 
Nov. 24, 1841, a son of Daniel Rife. In 1861 he entered 
Miami University, Oxford, Ohio, and took a full scientific 
course, graduating in 1863. The following winter he began 
the study of medicine, under the direction of Dr. L. C. Mc- 
Connell, and remained with him till 1865. He took a course of 
lectures in the medical department of the University of Mich- 
igan in 1865-'66, and subsequently entered the College of Medi- 
cine and Surgery, Cincinnati, Ohio, from which he graduated 
in 1869. He now has a large and increasing practice at Bos- 
ton, giving his entire attention to his profession. Dr. Rife is 
a member of Downey Lodge, No. 233, F. & A. M., and 
King Solomon Chapter, No. 4, R. A. M., Richmond. He 
has been School Trustee of Boston fifteen years. In 1864 he 
was married to Mary, daughter of Joseph Bosworth, of Preble 
County, Ohio. They have two children — Eva and Ada. 

J. F. Rinehart was born in Preble County, Ohio, Aug. 
24, 1831. He spent his early life on a farm and in attending 



BOSTON TOWNSHIP. 299 

school, and after reaching his majority began working on the 
farm for himself. Aug. 16, 1864, he located in Boston and 
has since then been engaged in the general mercantile 
business. In April, 1869, he was elected Justice of the 
Peace, and re-elected, serving three consecutive terms. He 
is a charter member of Rinehart Lodge, No. 310, I. O, O. F. 
He has been connected with the Christian church since its 
organization in the township. Jan. 22, 1854, he was married 
to N'ancy Gordon, who was born in Union County, Ind., Oct. 
22, 1836. She died March 10, 1860. They had two chil- 
dren — Harriet F. (deceased) and Genetta E. Aug. 16, 1864, 
Mr. Rinehart married Nancy Steele, a native of Pennsylva- 
nia, born April 21, 1837. They have had two children, 
Eva L., and an infant, deceased. Politically Mr. Rinehart 
is a Democrat. 

John Roper, deceased, was born in Liverpool, England, 
and when thirteen years of age came to the United States 
with his parents. His father died the night they landed in 
this country. The family located in Yirginia, where our 
subject was married to Elizabeth Keesling. In 1808 they 
came overland to Indiana and settled in Boston Township. 
He entered 160 acres of land, which he improved, and ulti- 
mately became one of the prosperous farmers of the county. 
He served as Constable when the seat of justice was at Salis- 
bury. Mr. and Mrs. Roper had a family of ten children, seven 
of whom are living — William, John, Mrs. Eve Fisher, Mrs. 
Mary Campbell, of Nebraska; Mrs. Susan Hurst, of Kansas; 
Thomas and Mrs. Hannah Kilmer. Mr. Roper died March 
10, 1864, aged seventy-five years. His wife died April 29, 
1880, aged ninety years. Their daughter Eve was married 
in 1836 to John Fisher. They lived in Preble County,' 
Ohio, a short time and then returned to Wayne County, where 
he died in 1849. They had a family of six children — Amos, 
Mary E., Lena, Patsey (deceased), Benjamin and Nancy 
Ann. In 1866 Mrs. Fisher came to Boston Township and 
has since made this her home. 

Isaac N. Seaney was born in Boston Township, Wayne 
Co., Ind., Dec. 18, 1831, a son of Owen and Martha (Grimes) 
Seaney. His grandparents, Owen and Honor (Estel) Sea- 



300 HISTORY OF WAYNE COUNTY. 

ney, were natives ot North Carolina, and came to Wayne 
County, Ind., in 1810, and located on section 3, Boston Town- 
ship, where they entered 160 acres of land from the Govern- 
ment. They had a family of nine children — Samuel, John, 
Bryant, Isaac, Jacob, Owen, Katie, Susan, and Sarah. Owen, 
Jr. was nine years of age when his parents came to Indi- 
ana, lie was married March 24, 1825, to Martha, daughter 
of William and Effie (Meeks) Grimes. Her parents were 
early settlers of Wayne County, where they died, her father, 
Feb. 6, 1853, aged sixty-seven years, and her mother, June 
28, 181:9, aged fifty-eight years. To Mr. and Mrs. Owen 
Seaney were born ten children, of whom three are living — 
William, Isaac N. and John W. The deceased were — 
Sarah J., Alexander, Squire, Nancy, and three died in in- 
fancy. Mrs. Seaney died July 16, 1846, aged thirty-seven 
years, and Mr. Seaney, March 17, 1871, aged seventy years. 
Isaac N. Seaney was married Dec. 5, 1858, to Caroline, 
daughter of J. M. Bulla, and settled on the farm where he 
still resides. He owns 344 acres of good land in Wayne 
County, 184 acres of which was a part of the old homestead. 
Mr. and Mrs. Seaney are members of the LTniversalist 
church at Boston, and he is a member of Downey Lodge, No. 
233, A. F. & A. M. They have had a family of seven chil- 
dren, six of whom are living — Cora I., now Mrs. Wm. F. 
Mullen; William O., Mary O., Joseph M., Julia N., and 
Bessie. Eudora is deceased. Politically Mr. Seaney is a 
Democrat. 

William G. Seaney was born March 10, 1827, in Boston 
Township, Wayne Co., Ind., a son of Owen Seaney. He 
was reared a farmer, and after he grew to manhood purchased 
the old homestead of his father, where he still resides. He 
was married to Rebecca, daughter of William McKown, of 
Wayne County, Ind. She died July 22, 1849, aged twenty- 
one years. Sept. 21, 1851, Mr. Seaney married Margaret, 
daughter of John and Wilhelmina Miller. She was born 
Jan. 1, 1830, in Butler County, Ohio. They have one son — 
John F., born Aug. 16, 1852. Mr. Seaney owns 202 acres 
of tine well-cultivated land, and is one of the substantial 
farmers of the township. Politically he is a Democrat. 



BOSTON TOWNSHIP. 301 

John Sheffer, farmer, Boston Township, was born on the 
farm where he now resides, Dec. 25, 1832, a son of Daniel 
and Catherine (Keesling) Sheffer. He received a practical 
education in the district school, and has always followed the 
vocation of a farmer. He now owns 118J acres of excellent 
land, all well improved. Mr. Sheffer is one of the best farm- 
ers of the township. He was married July 2, 1859, to 
Bridget Ann, daughter of Peter Gallagher, a native of Ire- 
land. They have had eight children — Savannah C, Luella, 
Mary C, Frank E., Sarah A. (deceased), Homer, an infant 
(deceased), and Nora E. Politically Mr. Sheffer is a Repub- 
lican. 

Jacoh Sinelse)\ Sr., deceased, was born in Pennsylvania, 
May 1, 1784, of German parentage. His parents, Peter and 
Barbara Smelser, left Pennsylvania in 1788, and -settled in 
Kentucky. Jacob was thrown on his own resources at an 
early age. When twenty-eight years of age he married 
Elizabeth, daughter of Nicholas Smith, in Kentucky, and 
iu 1824 came to Indiana and purchased 160 acres of land, on 
which was a pole barn and an old log cabin. He was a suc- 
cessful farmer and accumulated a property worth $100,000. 
In early life he was a Jacksonian Democrat, but being of 
strong anti-slavery sentiments he became associated with the 
Whig party, and subsequently with the Republican party. 
He at one time owned several slaves, but gave them their 
freedom. He was liberal and public-spirited, and gave freely 
to the support of churches and schools. Mr. Snaelser died 
Dec. 8, 1875, aged ninety-one years, and Mrs. Smelser April 
7, 1869, aged seventy-five years. They had a family of nine 
children — Harriet, Solomon, Catherine, Margaret, James, 
Isham, Jacob, Minerva and Tracy. Catherine, now Mrs. 
Esteb, and Tracy, now Mrs. Osborn, reside in this county. 

Winjleld Smelser^ farmer, postoffice Smithtield, was born 
on the old homestead in Wayne County, Ind., in 1852, a son 
of Jacob Smelser, Jr. He was reared a farmer, and re- 
ceived a practical education in the common schools. He now 
owns 160 acres of excellent land, all well-improved and under 
cultivation. He was married Nov. 26, 1872, to Mary E., 
daughter of Joseph M. Bulla, Sr. They have had five chil- 



302 HISTORY OF WAYNE COUNTY. 

dren; but two are living — Lizzie and India. Murray, Eva 
and Blanchie are deceased. 

Levi Stanley was horn in Clermont County, Ohio, in 1814, 
a son of Aaron and Mary (Cupjjy) Stanley, his father a na- 
tive of North Carolina and his mother of Ohio. His father 
settled in Ohio after attaining his majority, in 1809 or 1810, 
and in 1818 removed to Union County, Ind. He resided 
there nearly half a century, and subsequently removed to 
Kichmond, where he died. He married Mary, daughter of 
Henry and Sarah Cuppy, and to them were born thirteen 
children — Eliphalet, Levi, Rebecca, Henry, Sarah, Nicholas, 
Nancy, Joseph, Emily, Jane, Amanda, Melvina and Mary. 
He died Jan. 17, 1866, aged eighty-tliree years, and his wife 
in 1849, aged fifty-four years. Our subject's grandparents, 
Joseph and Catherine Stanley, had eleven children — Eliza- 
beth, Zachariah, Joseph and Jehu (twins), Sarah, Aaron, 
Nancy, Mary, Eunice, Beulah and Jeremiah. His maternal 
grandparents, Henry and Sarah Cuppy, settled in Wayne 
County in 1817 or 1818, where they died about 1833. They 
had a family of eight children — Daniel, Mary, Rebecca, 
James, Thomas, John, Abraham and Harrison. Our sub- 
ject was reared on a farm, and received a practical education 
in the common schools. He was married in 1836 to Susan 
B., daughter of Samuel and Mary Butler, and in 1837 set- 
tled on the farm where he now resides. He at that time 
purchased ninety-three acres of wild land, but has added to 
it till he now owns 134 acres of well-improved land. Mr. 
and Mrs. Stanley have had eleven children, nine of whom 
are living — Francis, Rebecca, Jesse, Isaac, Abraham, Ann 
Eliza, Emma, Ella and Elwood. William H. and Mary are 
deceased. William enlisted in Company A, One Hundred 
and Thirty-third Indiana Infantry, in 1864. Mr. and Mrs. 
Stanley are members of the Methodist Episcopal church. 
Mrs. Stanley's parents, Samuel and Mary (Davenport) But- 
ler, were natives of (reorgia. They, had a family of eight 
children— Susan, Melinda, Mary, Jesse, Beal, William, 
Jacob and Rebscca. Her grandparents, Beal and Mary 
(Carter) Bntler, came to Indiana in 1806, and settled in Cen- 
tre Township. They had a family of four children— Samuel, 



BOSTON TOWNSHIP. 303 

\ 

Susana, William and Mary. Mrs. Batler died Aug. 3, 1831, 
and Mr. Butler subsequently married Jane Osborn. Of their 
four children, two are living — Chatlield and Emeline. 

George W. Stevenson was bora in Boston Township, 
Wayne County, Ind., Nov. 29, 1821, a son of Joseph and 
Sarah (Martin) Stevenson, his father a native of Maryland, 
and his mother, of Scotland. His grandparents, George and 
Sarah (Cropper) Stevenson, located in Wayne County in 
1807. They had a family of eight children — Vincent, 
Rachel, Joseph, George, Sarah, James, Levi and Thomas. 
George Stevenson was born Aug. 18, 1T57, and died Aug. 31, 
1828. He and five brothers served in one company in the 
war of the Revolution, under General Washington. His wife 
was born Nov. 24, 1763, and died Feb. 20, 1830. They 
were married Jan. 17, 1782. Our subject's maternal grand- 
parents, Aaron and Mary Martin, settled in Wayne County 
in 1806, and in 1812 entered 160 acres of land on sec- 
tion 30, Boston Township, He was an Associate Judge, and 
held other positions of responsibility and trust. He was 
also a minister of the regular Baptist church, and one of the 
organizers of tliat denomination in Wayne County. They 
had a family of four children — James, a minister of the 
Baptist church; Sarah, Samuel and Elizabeth. Mr. Martin 
died Aug. 13, 1826. The subject of our sketch has always 
pursued the vocation of a farmer, and now owns a fine 
farm of 200 acres, all well-improved. He is one of 
the most influential men of the township, and has held 
some of the principal offices of trust. He was married 
March 14, 1844, to Mary A., daughter of John and Mar- 
garet Burk. They have had a family of eleven chil- 
dren, of whom Martha A., John W., James, Melvina, 
Julia, Joseph W., George and Ella are living, and Mar- 
garet, Elizabeth and Harry are deceased. Mrs. Steven- 
son died Oct. 3, 1881, aged fifty-three years and ten months. 
Mr. Stevenson and his family are members of the Method- 
ist Episcopal church. 

Hiram Salser was born in what is now Union County, Ind., 
Dec. 1, 1816, a son of James and Lydia (Ilambo) Sulser, na- 
tives of Virginia, his father of German descent. His parents 



304 HISTORY OF WAYNE COUNTY. 

removed to Ohio in 1813 or 1814, and two years later catne 
to Indiana. They had a family of five children — Hammond, 
Morrison, Harrison, Hiram and Garrison. His mother died 
in 1824, aged thirty-six years, and his father subsequently 
married Nancy Weaver, by whom he had one child — Martha. 
His father died April 4, 1868, aged eighty-two years, and his 
wife, Aug. 21, 1872, aged seventy-five years. Mr. Siilser's 
grandparents, Jackson and Nancy Rambo, were among the 
early settlers of Wayne County. They were members of 
the Methodist Episcopal church, and among the influential 
citizens of tlie township. Their children were — Absalom, 
Adonijah, Isaac, Lurenzo Dow, Lydia, Damaris, Malinda 
and May. Mr. Rambo died May 24, 1816, aged fifty-five 
years, and his wife, Dec. 24, 1846, aged eighty-seven years. 
Our subject was married April 8, 1841, to Jane, daughter of 
James and Mary Johnston, of Clarke County, Ohio. He has 
served one term as Justice of the Peace, and two terms as 
Township Trustee. He has a good farm of S9venty-two 
acres on sections 31 and 32. Politically he is a Democrat. 

Nathan Taylor is a native of North Carolina, born in 1816, 
and a son of Thomas and Hannah (Nuby) Taylor. His father 
came to Wayne County, Ind., in 1812 with Nathan Small, to 
whom he was bound. He enlisted in the war of 1812, going 
first as a substitute, and after the expiration of his time re- 
enlisted and served till the close of the war. He then went ta 
North Carolina and was married, and in 1818 came again to 
Wayne County and settled on Elkhorn Creek. He accumu- 
lated a good property, owning at his death 180 acres of land. 
To him and his wife were born thirteen children, ten of 
whom are living — Nathan, Sarah, James, Maxey, Charles, 
Zilla, Lovie, David, Rachel and Susan. John and two infants 
are deceased. Nathan, the eldest, 'has lived in Wayne County 
since two years of age. He has b3en twice married. In 
1838 he married Jemima Blake, who died Oct. 6, 1873, aged 
fifiy-three years. They had five children — Nancy, Mary Ann, 
Isaac T., Maxey and James A. In 1875 Mr. Taylor married 
Sarah Stacks by whom he has two children — Hannah Ae and 
Oliver D. In 1850 he removed to Ohio and lived there till 
1868, when he returned to Boston. Mr. Taylor is a member 
of the Methodist church. 



BOSTON TOWNSHIP. 305 

Edward Timberlake^ farmer and stock-raiser, postoffice 
Richmond, was born in Highland County, Ohio, Dec. 9, 
1846, a son of Alfred and Phebe (Doan) Timberlake, natives 
of Ohio. His earlj life was spent on the farm and in attend- 
ing the district school. He subsequently attended the Nor- 
mal School at Lebanon, Ohio, and when sixteen years of age 
began teaching. He taught for eighteen years in the schools 
of Illinois, Indiana and Ohio. In 1880 he was elected Trustee 
of Boston Township, and was re-elected in 1882. In 1868 he 
was married to Martha B., daughter of Benjamin and Mary 
* Ann Brown. They have one son — Bsnjamin B. They are 
leading members of the Society of Orthodox Friends, both 
being Elders and Overseers. Mr. Timberlake is Yice-President 
of the County Sabbath-school Association and President 
of the Township Association. Politically he is a Repubican 
and is Treasurer of the Wayne County Republican Com- 
mittee. 

James Watson was born in Wayne Township, Wayne 
County, Ind., April 1, 1821, a son of William and Nancy 
(Rue) Watson. His father was a native of Maryland, and 
was married in 1810 to Nancy Rue. They lived in Wayne 
Township. He was a soldier in the war of 1812. They had 
a family of thirteen children, eight of whom are living — 
Samuel, James, Mary, Malinda, William, Nancy, Harmon 
C, and Rebecca. Elizabeth, Henry, Robert, Richard and 
Sarah are deceased. Mrs. Watson died in 1819, aged fifty-eight 
years, and Mr. Watson in 1859, aged seventy-five years. 
Our subject's paternal grandparents, Robert and Malinda 
(Consley) Watson, were natives of England. He was a sea- 
faring man and died at Natchez, Miss. His wife came to 
Wayne County about 1803, where she died about 1850. She 
had a family of six children — William, Samuel, Elizabeth, 
Sarah, Robert and Jane. The maternal grandparents of our 
subject, Richard and Elizabeth (Holman) Rue, located in 
Wayne County in 1805. He was of French descent. He 
was one of the first Justices of the Peace in the county, and 
is said to have performed the first marriage ceremony in the 
county. He represented this district in the Territorial Legis- 
lature before Indiana was a State. He was a soldier in the 



306 HISTORY OF WAYNE COUNTY. 

war of the Revolution and was captured by the Indians in 
Kentuck}' and carried to Detroit, where he was exchanged. 
He was one of the founders of the Elkhorn Baptist church. 
Mrs. Rue died in 1833, and Mr. Rue in 184:4:, aged eighty- 
iive years. They had a family of nine children — Polly, 
Elizabetli, Rachel, Sally, Nancy, Henry, Samuel, Kelly and 
Jane. James "Watson, our subject, was reared on a farm, and 
received a common-school education. He now has a fine 
farm of 160 acres all well improved. Politically he is inde- 
pendent in his views. He was married in 1846, to Elizabeth 
Raper, daughter of William Raper. In 1850 he removed to * 
Holt County, Mo., but two years later returned to his old 
home. Mr. and Mrs. Watson have four children — Hannah, 
now Mrs. Stanley; Idelle, Howard and Lake George. 

Augustus A. Weller is a native of Maryland, born in 1832. 
He was married Oct. 26, 1858, to Maria Moore, a native of 
Wayne County, Ind., born in 1833, and a daughter of John 
and Sarah (Elston) Moore. After their marriage they settled 
in Boston Township, but subsequently removed to Michigan, 
where they lived eight years, and in April, 1883, settled in 
Liberty, Union Co., Ind. They have had a family of six 
children, but four of whom are living — Rebecca J., wife of 
Yincent Newman; Belle, David E., and Sarah C. The de- 
ceased are John and Addison. 




'^&135^ 



^w^ 



'l€>^ 





A.^ 



CHAPTtE IX. 

CENTRE. TOWNSHIP. 



Oeoanuatton.-I^iak TBonBLKS.-Pio™EB Lif^-Eaklt 
Ihb.stkibs.-C..t...:l.e.-Thb Olb Co^t. SE^r.-Ixs 
Eminent Citizens. -A Few ASeodotos. -Eablv Lyents in 

frToWN.-THE FlKST FmE C0MPANT.-BI,SINESS IktEK- 
EBTB._L0BaES.-CH.KCBES OE THE ToWN ANI, ToWNSHIP- 

Biographical. 

Centre Township was formed by the county commfesion 
ers Ano- 17 1817. Its boundaries were subsequently en 
:r.ed but have since been curtailed several times by he 
formation of other townships, but it still -»-' 7°;;|„t 
largest in the county. The township contains -«^'™' f^J 
ing land, and the buildings and ""r™;"«"]%^ "^.ff^/b^ ^ 
liift class. It is well supplied with ':-l™f .f^"'' '^^^^X 
the Chicago and the Indianapolis divisions of 'heFan«e 
passing through it. Turnpikes are numerous and the stream 
pdisbiijji, mivu^ 1 anrfaoe is somewhat 

afford good water-power for mills, ihe siiriace 

rolling: the soil, rich and productive. 

Pro'bably the first settler of the 'ownship was Danie 
Nolan after whom Nolan's Fork was named. He and three 
oft:'soos-in-law located on the west bank of this stream, on 
the present McCoy farm, and began improving a q««>- er- ec 
tion At the time of the land sale they were unable to pay 
for the land, and Thomas McCoy took it »«. 'l^-' ^-^1 P^-; 
ing Nolan for his improvement. This was in 1812 McCoy 
or^inally from Kentucky, was one of the first -"'«- "f" ^ 
county, locating south of Richmond in 1805 He wa led to 
change his location by the following circumstance. One day 
his horses, which were allowed to run at large according to 
the then universal custom, strayed from the East Fork and 
came westward into what was then the Indian lands. McCoy 

«n7 



303 HISTORY OF WAYNE COUNTY. 

followed them and found them near Nolan's Fork, where no 
improvement had then been made. As it was late before he 
overtook the horses, he decided to encamp for the night and 
return home the following day. He found a beautiful spring, 
filled nearly full with the horns of deer, which it is supposed 
the Indians had placed there, and encamped near it. Before 
leaving in the morning he was so much pleased with the sur- 
roundings that he decided to purchase the land, return and 
live upon it as soon as it came into the market. The 
cabin built by Nolan stood a few steps from the house now 
occupied by Michael McCoy. During the Indian troubles, 
Thomas McCoy and his neighbors converted it into a block- 
house and surrounded it with a rude ditch and wooden pal- 
ings. They had a small cannon which they fired to warn the 
settlers in times of danger, and summon them to the protec- 
tion of the " fort." No serious diflSculties arose in this neigh- 
borhood. The lands along the creek were first taken up and 
improved. The Indians used to return to the stream to hunt 
as late as 1820. Two, whose names were John Green and 
Ben Davis, are still remembered by some of the old residents. 

Henry Bryan, the first county surveyor, was a man of very 
superior intelligence. He was a native of Delaware and set- 
tled on the east side of Nolan's Fork, opposite the McCoy 
farm. He was born in 1768 and died in 1835. He was one 
of the very first settlers of Centre Township, removing in 
1811 to the farm on which he died. During the Indian 
troubles, Bryan quitted his farm for one or two seasons, re- 
turning after hostilities had ceased. 

William Crawford, a jovial and social man, who exhibited 
a great fondness for visiting his neighbors during the later 
years of his life, was another early settler on Nolan's Fork. 
He had a distillery which is supposed to have been the first 
in the county. A man named See lived south of the McCoy 
farm, and William Conner adjoining; James Hayes' was the 
next farm south, extending to the township line. David J. 
Woods lived west of the creek in the southern part of the 
township. Caleb Jackson came early. His son, Joseph W., 
also early improved a farm in the western part of the town- 
ship. Greenburg Cornelius settled in 1811 on land which is 



CENTEE TOWNSHIP. 309 

now a part of the county farm. William and John Harrey, 
James Townsend, Exum Elliott and Eobert Galbraith were 
all early settlers in the western and northern part of the town- 
ship. Edward Benbow and Joseph Overman, the latter from 
North Carolina, settled about 1813. John Stiggleman settled 
early, where his son Henry lives. Michael Harvey, John 
Elwood, Joseph Overman, Jacob Griffin (who came from 
IsTorth Carolina about 1813), John Maxwell (from Tennessee, 
about 1814) John King (from Kentucky, 1812) Jehu Wicker- 
sham (1816), John Garrett, William Hosier (from North 
Carolina, 1811, on the David Commons farm) and Robert 
Harvey all deserve to be named among early settlers. 

William Sumner, from Virginia, settled early near Cen- 
treville, and was the first owner of the land on which most 
of the town stands. John King afterward owned a portion 
of the land. Israel Elliott also settled near town. Evan 
Shoemaker located on the next farm east. A man named 
Bell entered several tracts of land in the same neighborhood, 
but never settled here. James Junkins and Robert Black 
came quite early. 

Among the pioneers of the western part of the township 
were John Hill, from North Carolina, about 1814; Ezekiel 
Commons, about 1813; Daniel Stone, on the place where 
James Neil afterward had a tavern and a blacksmith shop; 
Francis Coflin; John Woodward, on the farm afterward owned 
by Conover; Samuel Parker, James Martin and Charles 
Can ad ay. 

Among the early settlers in the eastern part of the town- 
ship were: Joseph Overman, Wm. and Thomas Culbertson, 
Vinnedge Russell, Richard Pedrick, James E. Bryant, Isaac 
Miller, Joseph Kem and others. In the southern part of the 
township, early, were: John Jones, from Yirginia, who 
several times represented this county in the Legislature; 
Beale Butler, once Associate Judge and County Commis- 
sioner; Peter and Zachary Dicks, from North Carolina, who 
settled about 1812; William Bundy; John Smith, son of 
John Smith, the founder ot Richmond; Daniel Crow, from 
North Carolina; Nathaniel Bell; David Galbraith, on land 
since owned by Joshua Eliason; Isaac Williams, on land 



310 HISTORY OF WAYNE COUNTY. 

afterward owned by Thomas McConnaha and later by his 

sons. 

Isaac Julian was one of the pioneers of Centre Township 
and lived on the farm now owned by Oliver H. Brumiield. 
He was a man of good intelligence and scholarship and was 
for several years a school teacher. He also represented the 
county in the Legislature. Mr. Julian was the father of 
Jacob B., George W. and Isaac H. Julian. He died quite 

early. 

Robert Commons, a native of Ireland, came from Virginia 
and settled a mile and a half northwest of Centreville, where 
he died in 1S37, at the age of eighty-nine. Benjamin Maud- 
lin came from North Carolina to Wayne Township in 1807, 
and in 1813 removed to Centre Township, settling on Nolan's 
Fork, two and a half miles north of Centreville. He removed 
to Michigan about 1835, where he died. His son John, born 
in North Carolina in 1806, is now resident of Centreville. 
Joseph Holman, who lived on the farm now owned by Mr. 
Jackson, was one of the most prominent of the earl}' settlers. 
During the Indian troubles he erected a block-house on his 
farm. James Thompson, from New Jersey, settled on the 
place afterward owned by Wm. Frame, his son-in-law. 

Before the days of railroads the amount of travel over the 
National road was great. Drovers from the West with herds 
of cattle; emigrants from the East to the Western States and 
Territories, and mercantile travelers passed over the road. 
Joshua Eliason, whose house was a favorite stopping place, 
says that he has sometimes had over 130 people and three or 
four droves of cattle stay at his place in a single night. 

Mr. Morgan McCoy states that he is supposed to have been 
the second white male child born in the township, Jacob B. 
Julian being the first. The first death in the township was 
that of a man named Brinton, who was an early squatter on 
the George McConnaha farm: Brinton cut his knee while 
hewing timber with a broad-ax, and bled to death from the 
wound. He was buried on the farm. Margaret Bryan, who 
died Aug. 5, 1815, was the first whose remains were placed 
in the Bryan cemetery. One of the first marriages in the 
township was that of Henry Bryan to Jane Crawford. 



CENTRE TOWNSHIP. 311 

The first grist-mill in the township was erected by James 
Crawford, about 1816, on the site of the large mill now owned 
by Smith & Parrot, about a mile southwest of Centreville. 
It was a very primitive affair, consisting of a " corn cracker " 
and wheat burrs, with a rude shed over them. For the recep- 
tion of the wheat, large cuts from a hollow sycamore log were 
used. Jacob Wolf, after Crawford. He sold to Jacob Crull, 
Jr., who built the mill now standing. ]S"athan Hollingsworth 
was the next owner and made several improvements. Then 

came Jackson, McCoy & Gray, Rylan, Smith & Clark, and 

the present owners, Smith & Parrot. David J. Woods built 
a grist-mill and saw-mill in the southwestern part of the town- 
ship as early as 1820. Nothing of it now remains. Asa 
Provo erected a saw-mill on Nolan's Fork, north of Centre- 
ville, about 181Y. This was probably the first in the town- 
ship. Other early saw-mills were built by John Copeland, 
Robert Harvey, Exum White, Nathan Overman, and Nathan 
Hollingsworth. Robert Harvey erected a grist-mill near his 
saw-mill. David Commons afterward became the owner and 
made a fine mill of it. 

Robert Galbraith had a tannery three miles north of 
Centreville quite early. A carding-mill was established by 
Nathan Overman, a mile west of Centreville. John Max- 
well, a blacksmith, had a shop about two miles north of the 
town, early. Richard Cheeseman was an early settler in the 
northern part of the township. He erected a small grist-mill, 
or corn-cracker, as early as 1818, on Nolan's Fork. His 
nephew, Uriah Cheeseman, originally from New Jersey, 
settled on the west side of the present Centreville and Will- 
iamsburg turnpike, in 1821. 

CENTREVILLE. 

The town of Centreville, which for over half a century 
was the seat of justice in the county of Wayne, has in many 
respects a remarkable history. Rarely does it fall to the lot 
of any small place to be the home of so many eminent men, 
conspicuous in the affairs both of State and Nation, as have 
lived in Centreville in former years. The town lost her emi- 
nence as a political center and the home of politicians and 



312 HISTOKY OF WAYNE COUNTY. 

statesmen when she lost the county seat in 1873, but she 
still has many good and worthy citizens who are awake to the 
best interests of the county, and are ready to aid in advanc- 
ing the general Avelfare. The town has recovered from the 
depressing eifects of the county seat removal, and now ap- 
pears thrifty, energetic and prosperous. 

Centreville is situated near the geographical center of 
Wayne County, on the National road and the main line of 
the Chicago, St. Louis & Pittsburg Railroad. The town is 
rather attractive in its general appearance, containing many 
good buildings, and presenting many evidences of neatness 
and thrift. In 1880 its population was 870. It is probably 
over 1,000 at the present writing. The location is healthful 
and pleasant, and there is a rich agricultural country sur- 
rounding the town. Centreville was platted Oct. 20, 1814, 
by Henry Bryan, surveyor, and the survey was certified by 
the trustees Jan. 2, 1815. The ground was donated for the 
purpose of securing the county seat by Israel Elliott and 
Ethan A. Stone. Isaac Julian, Joseph Holman and William 
Harvey were appointed Trustees, and under their direction 
the town was laid out. Subsequently additions to the town 
plat were made as follows: By Joseph Evans, in March, 1818; 
by Lot Pugh, Micajah T. Williams and Arthur Henry, in 
June, 1818; by William Sumner, in January, 1819; by Will- 
iam M. Doughty and William Elliott, in December, 1830, 
and by Isaac Abrahams, in December, 1833. Certain lots 
were reserved for a public cemetery, for school purposes, etc 

The act making Centreville the county seat, although passed 
in 1816, did not become operative until a few years later. 
But lawyers, physicians and business men almost immedi- 
ately established themselves in the new town, which before 
1820 had become a village of considerable proportions for 
that day. In 1826 the town had two stores, three taverns, 
one grocery, one wagon-maker, one wheelwright, two pla?. 
terers, one tinsmith, one saddler, two blacksmiths, two 
cabinet makers, two shoemakers, one millwright, five car- 
penters, two bricklayers, one tailor, two tanners, three 
physicians, three lawyers, one school, one Masonic lodge, a 
postoffice, and the Western Times printing oflfice. The writer 



CENTKE TOWNSHIP. 313 

to whom we are indebted for the foregoing sumraarj esti- 
mated the population in 1826 at 200. Old residents claim 
that it was not less than 400, and the latter figures would 
better correspond with the industrial statement above given. 

Most of the great men of Centreville have been lawyers, 
and the history of their lives is narrated in another chapter. 
Here Oliver P. Morton worked at the hatter's trade; here 
General Lew Wallace and General Noble attended school, 
and here General A. E. Burnside worked at tailoring. 
To these famous names might be added many others, but 
it is unnecessary, as all are duly mentioned elsewhere in this 
work. 

The first store in Centreville was opened about 1815 by 
Caleb Lewis and Lawrence H. Brannon, who had a small 
stock of goods, and conducted the business in partnership. 
They came from the Kanawha Salt Works in Virginia. 
Joshua Eliason, then a boy, bought of them the first article 
ever sold by any merchant in the town — one pound of coffee; 
price, 50 cents. Samuel P. Booker opened a general store,^ 
with a fair stock of goods for that time, as early as 1819. He 
was a good business man, of fine appearance. He died in 
July, 1823, and is said to have been the wealthiest man then 
in the county. He was a native of Virginia. 

One of the first buildings erected in the town was a hewed 
log house, put up by a man named Galbraith on the corner 
where the American House now stands. Samuel P. Booker, 
and after him Isaac Burbank, kept store in it several years. 

Lewis Forkner, from North Carolina, settled m Centre- 
ville in 1817 and died in 1824. His son James was for many 
years a prominent business man of the town. 

Levi Jones was one of the early settlers and prominent 
business men ; followed building, brick-making, etc. He 
built the first brick house in town prior to 1823. He died 
in 1824. Judge Williams, now living east of town, engaged 
in the mercantile business and erected a brick house in Cen 
treville in 1823. James Blair was a merchant, cotemporary 
with Williams. Lot Bloomfield, lawyer, had a store soon 
after. Other early merchants were Isaac Burbank, who re- 
mained in business many years, Richard Cheeseman and 
21 



314 HISTORY OF WAYNE COUNTY. 

Thomas Commons. Among the mercantile firras in business 
here at various dates between 1835 and 1845 were Myers 
Seaton, Snyder & Adams, A. W. Ray & Co., Jacob Fisher, 
Ilolman & Ray, Hannah & Newman, J. and H. Purviance & 
Co., Isaac Burbank, Elmer & Forkner, Wm. B. Hornish, 
Richard II. Swain and William Arnold. In 1843 the town 
had nine general merchants and a larger population than at 
present. 

Samuel Hannah, afterward Clerk of Courts and State 
Treasurer, was for many years among the foremost business 
men of the town; he removed to Centreville in 1823. Dr. 
J ohn Prichett, now the oldest male resident of Centreville, 
first came to the place in 1826. 

The first tavern was probibly kept by Richel Neal. "Wm. 
Elliott kept a public house in 1823 and for some years there- 
after. Wra. Yaughan, Levi M. Jones and Samuel Hannah 
were among the early tavern-keepers. 

Among the early settlers were Dr. David F. Sacket, who 
moved from Salisbury; Dr. Ira Pier; James Rariden, Cyrus 
Finch, Martin M. Ray and John S. Newman, lawyers; Sep- 
timus Smith, lawyer and editor; Major John Gay, Deputy 
County Clerk; Daniel Strattan and Thomas G. Noble, a 
little later. 

The first tannery in Centreville was started by John Lewis 
about 1818. Daniel Strattan and Thomas Gentry each had 
taimeries prior to 1826 and carried on business many years 
later. 

The manufacture of hats, once an important industry in ev- 
ery village, was carried on in Centreville for many years. 
Probably the first who followed that trade here was Jacob 
N. Booker. He was followed by George Troxell and Will- 
iam Widup. Wm. S. T. Morton carried on the business 
quite largely several years, and his brother, afterward Gov- 
ernor, worked at the same trade. 

Caleb Hiatt, William L. Reynolds and H. E. Hiirlbut were 
early cabinet-makers. Isaac Forkner was the first black- 
smith. Lewis Burk and Frederic Dillon came soon after 
Forkner. Edward Benbow, Wm. Hill and Daniel Lantz 
were among the first wagon-makers. Martin Hornish and 



CENTRE TOWNSHIP. 315 

John Chapman were the first shoemakers. Jesse Willetts 
and Jacob Hornish were among the first carpenters. 

The first tailor was Charles F. Reed. Other early tailors 
were: John E. Dunham, Matthew W. Jack and William B. 
Hornish. Dunham followed tailoring many years, and about 
1840 had in his sliop an assistant named A. E. Burnside, 
since a famous G-eiieral. Burnside went from here to West 
Point, after working a year or so at tailoring. While he 
was in the shop, Dunham was Postmaster of the town. A 
man named Richards, remarkably tall and slender, then re- 
sided here, and was generally known by the nickname 
"Ramrod." One day he called at the postoflice to enquire 
for letters, and young Burnside waited upon him. "Any 
letters?" Burnside looked all through the " R's," all the 
time supposing Ramrod was the real name of his questioner, 
and then said, "No, Mr. Ramrod; nothing for you." Rich- 
ards flew into a passion at once and used bad words, threat- 
ening the young tailor; but the latter saw that he had made 
a blunder, and apologized. 

The first record of the proceedings of the town officers 
bears the date June 12, 1834. On that day M. M. Ray, John 
C. Kibbey, Jesse Williams, Daniel Strattan, Thomas Gentry 
and ISTelson Boon qualified as Trustees before Samuel Han- 
nah, Clerk of Courts of Wayne County. Daniel Strattan was 
elected President of the board. 

, The officers of the town for the year 1883-'4 are: Dr. Wm. 
F. King, First Ward; Hayman Dobbs, Second Ward; Albert 
R. Jones, Third Ward; George W. Gates, Fourth Ward; Geo. 
L. Gates, Fifth Ward, Councilmen. Hayman Dobbs, Presi- 
dent of the board. J. H. Gentry is Clerk; John K. Jones, 
Treasurer; George Sanders, Marshal; David A. Green, Pres- 
ident and Chief of the fire department; J. A. Bowen, Yice- 
President, fire department; James Nichols, First Engineer; 
C. B. Means, Second Engineer. Justices of the Peace: Da- 
vid Gentry and Allen Abernethy. The Townshi p Trustee is 
C. J. Harvey. 

Probably no small town in the State has a more efficient or 
better equipped fire department than Centreville. Among the 
by-laws and ordinances for the government of the corporation 



316 HISTORY' OF WAYNE COUNTY. 

adopted June 19, 1834, is one specifying that it shall be the 
duty of each male householder to provide himself with a sub- 
stantial bucket made of tin or wood, and at all times keep it 
in readiness for use when required. The marshal was author- 
ized to direct and control the fire department, which was to 
be made up of " all white male persons over the age of 
twenty-one years." This ordinance was repealed in 1836. 

In 1835 the trustees voted to build an engine-house, one 
storv high, 12 x 16 feet in size, and on the 5th of October 
authorized Frederick V. Snider to purchase a fire-engine, 
voting an appropriation of $300 toward paying for it. Mr. 
Snider purchased in Cincinnati, for $445, an engine that af- 
terward became noted in the town, and which was called 
" The Old Flame." April 21, 1836, a fire company was or- 
ganized, to act under the president and trustees of the corpora- 
tion. F. Y. Snider was appointed " Foreman and Commander- 
in-Chief of the Centreville Fire Company;" William Widup, 
Assistant; Lewis Jones, First Engineer, and Franklin Booker, 
Second Engineer. The fire company thus organized consisted 
of John E. Dunham, William Beverlin, John Chapman, Rob- 
ert Dinwiddle, David Dinwiddle, T. L. Doughty, J. P. 
Doughty, William Doughty, Jr., Samuel Delong, George 
Ilolman, William Dell, Thomas Brown, James Egler. Jesse 
Delong, Daniel Strattan, Henderson Fleming, John S. l^ew- 
man, Solomon Meredith, John Myers, William Evans, John 
Larue, Abner Haines, John H. Hutchinson,William S. T.Mor- 
ton, Thomas Gentry, John Winders, Norris Jones, Eli Jones, 
AVashington Jones, John Strattan, J. K. Godfrey, Daniel 
Johnson, John Jamieson, Jennings Fisher, and Aaron Har- 
vey. Of the foregoing, only David Dinwiddle, now of Phil- 
adelphia; George Holman, of Indianapolis, and Eli and 
Washington Jones are known to be living. 

A hook and ladder company organized at the same time 
with the above consisted of Michael Hornish, Crawford Con- 
ner, C. F. Miller, J. M. Fisher, James Forkner, Stephen Gas- 
ton, David Moore, Abel Evans, Isaac Snooke, J. L. Catter, 
G. W. Conner, E. A. Miller, George M. Evans, and Charles 
Wertman, all of whom are probably now dead. 

In consequence of a very destructive fire on the night and 



CENTRE TOWNSHIP. 317 

morning of the 15th and 16th of October, 1875, at which time 
nearly $40,000 worth of property was destroyed, the citizens 
decided that they needed more and better protection 
against damage by fire, and in December of the same year 
a fine steam fire-engine was purchased at a cost of $5,000. 
The present fire company was then organized, with M. Beit- 
zelle, Cliief, and Fred Lyman, First Engineer; J. H. Gentry, 
Secretar}'. Except one fire, Jan. 16, 1876, which destroyed 
property worth about $6,000, there has been no large fire 
in the town since that time. 

Some years before the war a pork-packing establishment 
was started in Centreville by Morris Jones and others. After a 
short time John Latchaw became the owner of the building 
and fitted it up for a steam flouring mill. The building was 
afterward destroyed by fire. Mr. Latchaw then erected the 
one now standing. William Clark and John P. Smith were 
the next owners, and from them the property passed into the 
hands of George Legate, the present proprietor. 

In 1868 Lyman & Haines erected a steam saw-mill in the 
eastern part of the town. J. A. Commons is the present 
owner, and does a good business. 

After the seminary building became the public school build- 
ing, in 1870, the former school-house was sold, and converted 
into a grist-mill by Charles Bertsch. It was afterward 
changed into a shoe factory, by a Mr. Somerby, of Indiana- 
polis, who failed after operating a short time. The building 
is now unused. 

In 1875 Vogel & Lincoln began the manufacture of organs 
in Centreville. In 1876 they moved to the old court-house, 
where Elisha Lincoln continued the business on quite a large 
scale, employing from twenty-five to thirty men. He failed 
after a short time and the industry ceased. The business was 
carried on under the name of the Hoosier Organ Company. 

A inachine shop and saw-mill was started about 1854 by 
Wharton Lyman, Norris Jones and others. After several 
changes the property was bought, in 1883, by T. H. Edmunds, 
who is doing a good business making cane-seated chairs and 
rockers. He saws his own lumber, and has a fine establish- 
ment, run and heated by steam. 



318 HISTORY OF WAYNE COUNTY. 

Centreville has a large and commodious public hall, two 
stories high, of brick. It was erected by Korris Jones in 
185S. The lower part is the engine-house and firemen's 
rooms and the the second floor contains the town hall. 

The leading business interests of Centreville in the year 
1884 are as follows: Lafayette Williams, Samuel C. Doughty, 
dry goods merchants; drug stores, Drs. Pricliett & Reed, Dr. 
Darnell; agricultural implements and groceries, J. A. Danbar 
& Co.; hardware and groceries, H. C. Leeson; groceries, G. 
Johnson, Geo. Wolf; boots and shoes, H. S. Scott; saddlery. 
Keys & Means; hotels — American, E. F. Horner; Park, D. 
A. Green; Jones House, Mrs. S. Jones; livery stables, Ru- 
dolph Shoff, D. A. Commons, Simon McConaha; grist-mill, 
Geo. Legate; saw-mill, J. A. Commons; chair factory, T. H. 
Edmunds; bank. First National. 

Centreville has six physicians: Drs. John Prichett, Wm. F. 
King, Hosea Tillson, Silas Kersey, — Gordon (homeop- 
athic), and Wm. Reed; and one lawyer, Thomas Means. 

The town is growing quite rapidly in population, and a 
very commendable spirit of business enterprise seems to have 
taken a firm hold. 

FIRST NATIONAL BANK. 

The First National Bank of Centreville was organized and 
began business in 1863. Among the stockholders were: Oli- 
ver T. Jones, Jacob B. Julian, Joseph W. Jackson, David 
Commons, Joshua Eliason, Jesse Gates, George W. Julian, 
James Forkner, Philip Jenkins, Joseph C. Ratlifi", Alexander 
Cheesman, William Culbertson, Jeremiah W. Swaiford and 
others. Oliver T. Jones was chosen President, and Benj. L. 
Martin, Cashier. Martin declining the office, J. P. Sonthard 
was elected in his place. A few months later Jacob B. Julian 
succeeded Jones as President, and Mr. Jones became Cashier. 
Mr. Julian remained the President until 1873, when he was 
succeeded by James Forkner, who served until his death in 
1880. The present President, Jesse Gates, was chosen in 1881. 
J. K. Jones is Cashier, and Geo. L. Cates, Assistant Cashier. 
The present Directors are: Jesse Cates, Philip Jenkins, Joseph 
C. RatliflF, Alexander Cheesman and J. K. Jones. The bank 



CENTRE TOWNSHIP. 319 

started with a capital of $100,000 which has since been re- 
duced to $50,000. It has a surplus fund of $20,000. 

LODGES. 

Masonic. — The first'Masonic lodge in Wayne County was 
organized at Centerville in 1823. In 1833 it was removed to 
Richmond. Its history is given among the lodges of that 
city. Hiram Lodge, JSTo. 42, F. & A. M., was organized in 
May, 1847, with Francis King, W. M. ; Samuel Boyd, S. W. ; 
Martin M. Ray, J. W.; John Prichett, Sec. There are no 
records of its charter members, but the following named 
members joined between 1847 and 1851: James Woods, 
Thomas G. Noble, Roswell Elmer, Edward H. Hudson, John 
M. Way, Michael Wilson, Samuel C. Meredith, Lazarus 
Noble, William Dewey, George W. Conner, Daniel B. Abra- 
hams, John C. Gregg, W. P. Hannah, Wm. B. Hornish, Isaac 
Forkner, Christopher A. Hill and Wra. B. Lucas. Prior to 
the re-organization in 1869, 155 members had been admitted. 
Nov. 11, 1869, the lodge was re-organized as Hiram Lodge, 
No. 417, under a dispensation. June 16, 1870, it was re-or- 
ganized under a charter. The charter members were: Joseph 
C. Ratliff, Wm. Dickey, Elihu M. Parker, Alvin J. Woods, 
Morgan McCoy, John F. Julian, John F. Kibbej^ and John 
Prichett. From 1869 to 1884 eighty-live have been adtnitted 
to membership. The lodge is out of debt and in a fair con- 
dition. The present officers are: Hosea Tillson, W. M.; 
John H. Wright, S. W.; Jos. Bowen, J. W.; Jos. A. Com- 
mons, Treas. ; John Prichett, Sec; Nirarod Parrot, S. D.; C. 
B. Means, J. D.; Clark S. Baker, T. 

Odd Fellows. — Hoosier Lodge, No. 23, I. O. O. F., was 
instituted Aug. 15, 1845. Charter members: Jas. W. Stuart, 
U. W. Gill, W. R. Edwards, M. Hoodan, E. H. Barry, Dan- 
iel Wooley, J. S. Harvey, W. B. Moffit, G. G. Hornan, S. O. 
Charles, J. F. Siddal, S. W. Webster, J. B. Anderson, A. 
A. Matthews, J. Systler, C. H. Burchenal. The lodge hall 
was burned in November, 1856. The present I. O. O. F. 
hall was built in 1860. It is a three-story brick building. 
This lodge now has sixty-six members, and property worth 
$2,400. The lodge lost $1,000 by a safe robbery in the winter 



320 HISTOKY OF WAYNE COUNTY. 

of 1884, The present officers are: James A. Maudlin, N. G.; 
William F. King, Y. G. ; Jesse B. Tiioraas, Sec; Mark Maud- 
lin, Per. Sec. 

Grand ^m-y.— Frank Beitzelle Post, No. 210, G. A. K., 
was chartered July 9, 1883, with the following charter mem- 
bers: Jesse B.Thomas, Marcellns Beitzelle, William F. King, 
John Pritchett, Henry C. Leeson, C. B. Jackson, Jesse 
Horney, Joseph F. Hatfield, Ferdinand Wann and William 
Matthews. H. C. Leeson was chosen Commander. In March, 
1884, the post had eighteen members and the following offi- 
cers: H. C. Leeson, C; Joseph Bowen, S. V. C. ; Joseph F. 
Hatfield, J. V. C; Jesse B.Thomas, Adjt.; Dr. Hosea Tillson, 
Surg.; Samuel I. Hertzell, Chap.; William Matthews, Q. M.; 
Marcellus Beitzelle, O. D.; Jacob Tibbetts, O. G. 

CHUKCHES. 

West Grove {Friends^) Meeting. — This church was organ- 
ized in 1815, and its first Monthly Meeting was held in the 
woods in that year. A log structure, without a chimney, but 
with a fire-place in the center, in which a ciiarcoal fire was 
kept up, was soon erected and used as a meeting-house. This 
was situated about three miles northwest of Centreville. 
About 1831 the log meeting-house was torn down and the 
present edifice took its place. Among the early preachers 
were: Jesse Bond, Hannah Baldwin and Daniel Williams. 
Early members: Robert Commons, William Hastings, Benja- 
min Maudlin, Jacob Griffin, James Townsend, William Har- 
vey, Exum Elliott, Obed Barnard, Edward Benbow, Abraham 
and Joseph Cook, Jehu Wickershara, John Brumfield, John 
Maxwell, John Harvey, John Copeland, Robert Harvey, 
George Russell, Charles Canaday and Nathan Overman. The 
society is still in existence; its membership is now about 125. 
A school was maintained by the Friends near the church for 
many years. 

Centreville M. E- Church was organized in 1823. The 
class then formed consisted of seven members : Israel and 
Mary Abrkhatns, Peter Ringo and wife, Mrs. Martha Talbot, 
Sarah Booker and Mrs. Hart, known as "Mother Hart." 
Sarah Reed joined a short time after the class was formed. 



CENTRE TOWNSHIP. 321 

Israel Abrahams was the Class-Leader. There had been 
preaching by Methodists in the town from 1820. The meet- 
ings were generally held in the court-house. Some of the 
early preachers were: Revs. Bigelow, Strange, White,^Haven, 
Wiley and Gath, some of whom were afterward noted as 
ministers and bishops. Members who connected themselves 
with the church early in its existence were; Elisha and Sam- 
uel King, Edward K. Hart, John Scott and wife, Mrs. The- 
resa Finch, Alfred Carter and wife, Ephraim J. Merritt and 
wife, and others. Mrs. Ham, of Centreville, is the oldest 
member of the congregation now living, and in the absence of 
any early records has furnished the writer most of the data 
for this sketch. About two years after the first class was 
formed Israel Abrahams, who was then a merchant in the 
town, erected a building for a store and residence (part of 
which is still standing), and fitted the upper portion of it for 
the use of the society. Here worship was held for nearly two 
years. A frame church was then erected in the eastern part 
of the town, and in it the first Sabbath-school in Wayne 
County was organized in 1827. The first conference ever held 
in Centreville was also held in this house later, Bishop Mor- 
ris presiding. The present brick church was erected in 1842 
and dedicated in October of that year. Just after the dedica- 
tion the last conference ever held in the town convened in it. 
Yery interesting|Sabbath-schools were held for several years 
succeeding by the M. E. and Cumberland Presbyterian 
churches together. When the new church was buiit the con- 
gregation had nine classes, the smallest of which numbered 
twenty-one members. In March, 1884, the church had 125 
members and about 140 Sabbath-school pupils ; value of 
church property, $4,000. Wm. Boston is the present pastor; 
G. W. Gates and A. D. Bowers, Stewards; G. W. Gates, Dr. 
Wm. Reed, A. J. Rarabo, Chas. Bertsch and Dr. Hosea Till- 
son, Trustees; A. D. Bowers and Hayraan Dobbs, Class- 
Leaders. 

Baptist Church. — A Baptist church was formed in the 
township as early as 1820, but ceased to exist many years 
ago. A meeting-house was built near Olive Hill. Among 
the first members were; Isaac Cotton and Samuel Taylor, who 



322 HISTORY OF WAYNE COUNTY. 

were preachers; John Stigleman, Richard Cheesman and 
Isaac Voorhees. There was also an early Baptist, church in 
Centreville, which erected the house Avhich was afterwards 
used by the Christians. 

Centreville Christian Church was organized about 1839, 
principally through the efforts of Elder Samuel K. Hoshour. 
Elder James McVay held a series of revival meetings which 
prepared the way for an organization. Many of the members 
came from the Baptist and Freewill Baptist denominations, 
both of which had organized many years previous. Among 
the original members were: Jesse Thomas and wife, Mrs. 
Judith King, Mrs. Lucinda Eliason, John Winder and wife, 
Mrs. Round tree, Mrs. Sally Dewey, Mrs. Patsy Thomas, 
Daniel Cr^i-w and wife, Mr. Tallhelm and wife, Elder Daniel 
Winder and wife. Joshua Eliason is the oldest member now 
living. Meetings were first held in the seminary and in the 
court-house. Then the church came into possession of a 
house previously erected by the Baptists at the north end of 
town, which was used until the present brick house was 
built in 1878. The new church cost about $5,000. The 
church now has nearly 100 members. Among the pastors 
have been Elderc S. K. Hoshour, James McOullough, A. I. 
Hobbs, Van Baskirk, R. T. Brown, R. L. Howe, Wm. J. 
Howe and J. B. Ludwig, the present pastor. 

Cumberland Presbyterian. — The Cumberland Presbyterian 
church, ofCentreville, was organized by Rev. Le Roy Woods, 
in December, 1842. The original members were: John B. 
Stitt, James Woods, Eliza A. Bolander, Sarah Garthwaite, 
James H. Hudson, Susan Hudson, A. F. Dunliam, Francis 
Smith, Henry Brown, Francis Smith, E. C. Seaton and Mary 
Stitt. The house of worsliip was erected in 1849. Among 
the pastors were: Revs. L. Woods, E. McCord, F. G. Black, 
Chas. Bond and H. D. Onvett. The org-anization, once 
flourishing, has become extinct and its church property was 
recently sold to the Friends. 

Presbyterian. — A Presbyterian church was formed in 
Centreville, April 14, 1866. Rev. James A. McKee and 
Rev. L. W. Chapman were present at the organization. 
Among the members were: John McFarland, Wharton Ly- 



CENTRE TOWNSHIP. 323 

man, John M. Coyner and Samuel Wilson, with their wives; 
Michael Wilson, Elizaheth Young, Elizabeth Huston, Caroline 
Dickey, Jane Rowan, Kate Johnson, Louisa A. Cunningham 
and Jane Doughty. The first Elders were: McFarland and 
Coyner. Pastors: Rev. F. L. Senour, S. S. Potter, Eben 
Muse and supplies. The congregation is small and has had 
no regular services for some time. The church edifice, a good 
brick building, was erected in 1868. 

Centreville Meeting. — The Friends organized a meeting in 
Centreville, in March, 1884. There had been meetings held 
for a year preceding, but no organization. There are about 
fifty members belonging to this meeting, which is under the 
charge of the Whitewater Monthly Meeting. For their 
services they have purchased for $320 the church in 
Centerville, built by the Cumberland Presbyterians. 

BIOGRAPHICAL. 

John 0. Austin is a native of Montgomery Co., Md., born 
March 29, 1807, a son of Thomas and Elizabeth (OfFord) 
Austin, His parents moved to the District of Columbia 
when he was quite young, and kept a hotel ,iii Georgetown. 
When he was ten years of age they moved to the Shenandoah 
Yalley, where he grew to manhood. They afterward moved <, 
to Hamilton County, Ohio, where the father died in 1829. Of 
ten children, John O. and a sister living in Union Co., Ind., 
are the only ones living. John O. Austin learned the shoe- 
maker's trade when a young man, at which he worked over 
forty years. In 1830 he moved to Richmond, remaining there 
till 1834. In 1832 he subscribed for the Palladium. While 
in Richmond he clerked in the dry-goods store of Theo. 
Sittle. In 1835 he went to Liberty, Union County, and soon 
after married Amy Rose, a native of Indiana, born in 1814, 
and a daughter of Abraham Rose. He located in Liberty, 
working at his trade in connection with farming. In the fall 
of 1871 he came to Wayne County, and bought the farm 
known as the Jacob Brooks farm, consisting of 105 acres of 
fine land with good farm buildings. At present he lives 
rather a retired life, renting his farm to his sons. Mr. and 
Mrs. Austin are members of the Congregational church. 



324 HISTORY OF WAYNE COUNTY. 

Their children are five in number — Warren B., John R., 
Catherine (wife ofP, S. Sutton), Brushrod W.,and Garrie D., 
the latter deceased. 

John N. Black, farmer, Centre Township, was born March 
9, 1834, a son of Robert and Julia Ann (Jackson) Black. 
Robert Black was a native of Kentucky, and came with his 
fatlier, James Black, to Wayne County, Ind., in 1813, settling 
three miles southwest of Richmond. He was married in 
1824, and settled on a farm two and one-half miles southwest 
of Centreville, which he entered, and where his family of six 
boys and two girls were born, and where he died in 1838, 
while his children were yet small, leaving his young wife de- 
pendent upon her good judgment and energy to raise them. 
She died in 1883 at the age ot eighty years, John !N. Black 
remained with his mother till his marriage. He then en- 
gaged in farming for himself on the farm where he was born, 
and of which he now owns 140 acres, most of it under culti- 
vation. He was married in 1857 to Julia Ann Kitterman, 
daughter of Philip and Salome Kitterman. They have three 
children — Mary C, wife of W. H. Petty; Joseph S. and Ida 
Belle. Mr. Black was initiated in Hoosier Lodge, JS^o. 23, 
I. O. O. F., April 3, 1880, and of which he is still a member 
of good standing. 

Joseph W. Black is a native of Center Township, born Nov. 
16, 1835, a son of IJobert and Julia Ann (Jackson) Black, and 
a cousin of Captain Caleb and Joseph W. Jackson . He was 
reared on a farm receiving his education in the common 
schools. Being early instructed in the different phases of 
farm life, he chose that as his occupation, and has been very 
successful, owning 110 acres of land, mostly improved, with 
good farm buildings. He was married in 1866 to Hannah 
Lamott, daughter of Joshua Lamott, one of the oldest resi- 
dents of Washington Township. They have a family ot 
eight children — Monroe M., Joseph W., Joshua R., Charles 
F., Walter, Freeman, Flora A. and Sadie E. 

Samuel K. Boyd, the oldest resident of Centre Township, 
was born in Madison County, Ky., June 29, 1794. In J 811 
his parents, Samuel and Isabel (Higgins) Boyd, came with a 
family of nine children to Wayne County, and settled on the 



CENTKE TOWNSHIP. 325 

Walnut Level, near Jacksonbur^, purchasing the land at the 
land sale of the Twelve-Mile Purchase, in October, 1811. 
Thev built a small cabin, 18 x 24, and went to work to clear 
up a farm. Samuel Boyd served as a soldier in the Revolu- 
tionary war, and was shot in the side of his head, the ball com- 
ing out near his nose, destroying the sight of one eye. He 
was in religious faith a Christian. He died at the age of sev- 
enty-three years. His wife died in 1852. They had ten 
children — James, John C, William, Elizabeth, Samuel K. , 
Martha, Robert, Mary, Isabel, and an infant. Samuel K. 
Boyd was reared a farmer, and has always followed that oc- 
cupation. He was married whe-n twenty-three years old to 
Martha Lewis, who died May 17, 1827, leaving five children, 
one an infant nine days old. He afterward married Bertha 
Ladd, who died in 1872. Mr. Boyd has lived a long life and 
has seen Wayne County in all its varied aspects. He served 
nine months in the war of 1812. 

Solomon Bruinfield, son of John and Margaret Brumfield, 
was born near Harrisburg, Pa., Feb. 9, 1805, and died near 
Centreville, Ind., Sept. 8, 1865. When about fourteen years 
of age he came to Wayne County with his parents and set- 
tled on Nolan's Fork, where his father died in 1834 and his 
mother in 1850. Of a family of six children but one is liv- 
ing — William H., an attorney of San Francisco, Cal. Solo- 
mon Brumfield was married April 12, 1827, to Eliza Boone, 
a native of Hamilton County, Ohio, born Jan. 15, 1810, and 
soon after settled on a farm of his father's. He subsequently 
bought a farm in Fayette County where they lived six years, 
when in 1834 he removed with his family to Centreville, and 
kept hotel several years. He then bought a farm of 300 
acres and engaged extensively in farming. He was also a 
veterinary surgeon of marked success. His widow still re- 
sides on the old homestead. She has been a cripple for six 
years, caused by the kick of a cow, but otherwise she is a 
smart, intelligent woman. They had a family of nine chil- 
dren — Margaret (wife of Thomas Means),^01iver H., Jesse C, 
Susan M. (wife of William McDonald), Charles R., Henry 
C, W. H. (died at the age of four years), Walter S. and Mil- 
lard F. 



326 HISTORY OF WAYNE COUNTY. 

Thomas Burris, a prominent farmer of Centre Township, 
was born in old Virginia, April 1, 1813. In 1826 his parents, 
Philip and Susan Burns, came to Wayne County, Ind., and 
settled on a farm in Washington Township, where they died 
in 1848. They had a family of eight children — Nancy, born 
in 1803; Thornton, died in 1845 ^ PoUy, now Mrs. Joseph 
Beck; Bartley, died in 1881; Thomas; Philip, died in infancy; 
Daniel and WilUam, of Fayette County, Ind. Thomas Bur- 
ris was married in 1836 to Virginia Davidson, of Wayne 
County. Tiiey have had three children — two sons and a 
daughter. The daughter died in infancy. One son, William, 
lives in Washington Township; the other, Robert, lives in 
Richmond. Mr. Burris owns 200 acres of fine bottom lands, 
and has been a successful farmer. 

Richard Garton Gharman was born in England, Oct. 6, 
1821, and died in Wayne County, Ind., June 21, 1883. lie 
came to America in 1817, and May 20, 1851, married Martha, 
daughter of John and Nancy Crawford. Soon after his mar- 
riage he moved to Centreville, Ind., and worked at the 
painter's trade ten years. After the death of Mrs. Charman's 
mother they moved to the Crawford farm, and her father 
made his home with them until his death. Mr. Charman 
carried on the farm very successfully. He was an indus- 
trious man and influential, being alive to all enterprises of 
interest to the community. Mrs. Charman still resides on 
the farm. It contains 130 acres of valuable land, and was 
entered from the Government by her grandfather, William 
Crawford. Mrs. Charman has three sons — Arthur C, mar- 
ried Jennette, daughter of James and Phoebe Culbertson; 
Richard G. married MinnieF.,daughterofYincent and Char- 
lotte Parsons, of Muncie, Ind. ; Albert R. is a graduate of 
and now a teacher in the Terre Haute schools. 

Thomas J. Clevenger was born in Abington Township, 
Wayne Co., Ind., Dec. 28, 1851, a son of Samuel and Ruth 
(Spahr) Clevenger, his father a native of Warren County, 
Ohio, born March 9, 1810, and his mother born in Virginia, 
Jan. 5, 1813. His grandfather, Daniel Clevenger, came with 
his family to Wayne County in 1815 and settled in Abing- 
ton Township. Samuel Clevenger and Ruth Spahr were 




^ ' 




. s^.^ C^i.-c^c^.<^<hr.^cx.<^ 



^SV 




ry%/^//w 




/ i 



m^'ni/^^rh 



CENTRE TOWNSHIP. 327 

married Oct. 2i, 1833. They reared ten children; eight 
are living — Rebecca, wife of J. W. Connelly; Sabra, wife of 
Emanuel Leab; Mary, wife of David Riegel; Samuel S.; 
Joseph; Nancy L., wife of W. M. Quinn; Thomas J. and 
Francis M. Mr. Clevenger was a successful farmer and 
owned 380 acres of fine land. He died April 28, 1881. His 
widow still resides on the old homestead. Thomas J. Clev- 
enger received a good common-school education, and on 
reaching his majority settled on a farm of his own. He now 
owns eighty acres of good land, well improved, a story and 
a half frame residence and comfortable frame buildings. He 
has a fine grade of stock, both cattle and hogs. Mr. Cleven- 
ger was married Feb. 12, 1880, to Evaline, daughter of 
Isaiah and Jane Helms, of Wayne County. 

David ConiTnons, deceased, was the j'oungest of nine chil- 
dren of Robert and Ruth (Hayes) Commons, and was born in 
Grayson County, Ya., July 18, 1800. His father was born 
in Ireland, of English parentage, and when an infant was 
brought by his parents to America. His mother was a na- 
tive of Pennsylvania where she was married, and where 
eight of her children were born. Both parents were mem- 
bers of the Society of Friends. Robert Commons was by 
trade a weaver of fine linen. In 1812 he removed with his 
family to Wayne County, Ind., and entered 180 acres of land 
on ITolan's Fork, now owned by J. C. Harvey. He was 
a small but vigorous man, and was one of Wayne County's 
most worthy pioneers. He died Dec. 28, 1837, in the nine- 
tieth year of his age. His wife survived him till Sept. 23, 
1845, also in her ninetieth year. Their children were — Lydia, 
Phoebe, Isaac, William, John, Ezekiel, Nathan, Hannah and 
David. David Commons was reared on a pioneer farm. In 
1836 he purchased a farm on which was a small mill for 
grinding corn. This he rebuilt in 1839 and furnished with 
two run of burrs for grinding wheat and one for corn. He 
also built a saw-mill, and in 1838 erected the brick residence 
now owned by his son, Walter S. It was far in advance of 
the age in design and finish. He was a man of energy, per- 
severance and endurance, and was progressively ahead of his 
time. He filled many oflices of trust with great ability. In 



328 HISTORY OF WAYNE COUNTY. 

1836 he was elected Commissioner of Wayne County, and 
served three terms. In 1847 he was elected to represent 
Wayne County in the &tate Legislature, and served two 
terms. He was an extensive farmer and real-estate owner 
and breeder of tine stock. He was foremost in aiding all 
measures of public interest; was energetic in securing the 
pike roads; was one of the builders of the Indiana Central 
Railroad, and for many years was one of its Directors, He 
was a member of no church, but was in religious faith a 
Friend. His heart was large and reached out to the needy, 
and his noble generosity proved his greatest financial enemy. 
]So man in Wayne County was more sensibly missed than 
David Commons. He was one of the charter members and a 
Director of the Centreville National Bank. He was one of 
the devoted defenders of human rights and served the princi- 
ples of Republicanism and the party faithfully through life. 
He was married Feb. 26, 1824, to Rachel, daughter of John 
and Rachel Mote, of Miami County, Ohio. Two sons were 
born to them — John M., of Indianapolis, and Philip S., of 
Rice County, Kas., a farmer and minister in the Society of 
Friends. Mrs. Commons died May 22, 1827, aged twenty- 
four years. Sept. 29, 1831, Mr. Commons married Bethena, 
daughter of Joseph and Elizabeth (Jones) Carter, and a na- 
tive of Greenville, Tenn., born Aug. 13, 1813. To them were 
born seven children — Sarah A. (deceased), wife of Thomas 
Jordan, of Richmond, Ind.; William M., died Aug. 25, 1853; 
Isaac L., of Des Moines, Iowa; Robert D., died May 14, 
1879. He served three years in the war of the Rebellion, in 
the Eighth Indiana Infantry, and was wounded at Yicksburg, 
May 22, 1863; Joseph A., of Centreville; Mary E., wife of 
Ira Izon, of Indianapolis, and Walter S. Mrs. Commons' 
parents removed to Indiana in 1829, and settled in Madison 
County. They had a family of thirteen children — Wesley, 
Mary, Bethena, Usiah, John C, Hilah, Edward J., Joseph,. 
William, James C, Thomas E., Nancy and Levi. Bethena 
and Hilah are the only ones living. 
Joseph A. Commons, dealer in hardwood lumber, is a native 
of Wayne County, Ind., born May 22, 1842, a son of David 
and Bethena (Carter) Commons. He was reared a farmer^ 



CENTKE TOWNSHIP. 329 

receiving his primary education in the common schools. He 
subsequently attended Earlham College and the Miami Com- 
mercial College, at Dayton, Ohio. After leaving college he 
engaged in farming several years. In 18Y9 he bought the 
saw-mill of the John Sintz estate, and has since then carried 
on the mill and dealt extensively in lumber. He has always 
taken an interest in the affairs of the township and has 
served two terms as its Trustee, He is also Treasurer of the 
School Board. He is a member of Hiram Lodge, No, 41 Y^ 
F. & A. M., and Hoosier Lodge, Ko. 23, I. O. O. F. In 
1868 Mr. Commons was married to Amanda, daughter of 
David B. Beeson. They have one son — Lawrence D. 

W. S. Commons, youngest child of David and Bethena J. 
(Carter) Commons, was born in Wayne County, Ind., March 
28, 1853. He grew to manhood on the farm where he was 
born, and which he now owns. His education was princi- 
pally obtained in the common schools. He spent the year 
1870 in Earlham College, but was called home by his father's 
sickness and death. He then assumed the charge of the farm 
and care of his mother. Dec, 31, 1874, he was married to 
Sarah A., daughter of Mark and Elizabeth (Merideth) Maud- 
lin. They have three children — Ernest L,, Charles C. and 
Horace J. Mr. Commons is one of the energetic young far- 
mers of Wayne County, He makes a specialty of breeding 
short-horn cattle. Politically he is a Republican. 

JRobert Delap was born in Ohio, Oct. 14, 1811, a son of 
James Delap, a native of Yirginia, His father was married 
in Virginia and soon after moved to Tennessee, thence to 
Ohio, and in 1811 to Wayne County, Ind., and settled ou a 
part of the land now owned by Robert Delap, He died in 
1842. His wife survived him several years. Of a family of 
five children, but two are living — Robert and Jane, wife of 
George Cook. Robert Delap was reared a farmer, and re- 
ceived but a limited education. He has engaged extensively 
in farming and stock-raising, and has accumulated a large 
property, owning between 400 and 500 acres of land. His- 
residence is the largest and most extensive in the township, 
and farm buildings are commodious and well built. After 
reaching his majority he bought a saw-mill, which he carried 
23 



330 HISTORY OF WAYNE COUNTY. 

on in connection with his farm. In March, 18—, he was 
married to Mary Bramer, a native of Wayne County. Mr. 
Delap is a public-spirited, whole-souled man; liberal to all 
benevolent institutions, and especially toward all enterprises 
that are of interest to his township. 

Albert Bruce Dunbar was born in Wayne County, March 
15, 1854. He is of English ancestry. His grandfather, 
William Dunbar, was born in 1783, and his grandmother, 
Kebecca Dunbar in 1788. His father, James Dunbar, was 
born in Union County, Ind., Jan. 4, 1821, and in 1846 was 
married to Mary Mateer, and removed to Wayne County, and 
settled in Abington Township, where he followed farming in 
the summer and taught school during the winter for sixteen 
years. At the begining of the civil war he returned to Union 
County, but remained only a year, returning to Wayne 
County, and was soon after elected Trustee of Centre Town- 
ship, holding the position the remainder of his life. He was 
for many years Justice of the Peace of Abington Township. 
He studied medicine and practiced in his younger days, but 
not liking the profession abandoned it. He was a man of 
perseverance and enterprise, and a leading citizen of the 
county. He was a prominent member of the Odd Fellows 
fraternity. Politically he was a Republican, and an active 
man in all measures tending to the success of the Union in 
the time of the war. He died Aug. 17, 1869. His widow 
lives in Centre Township. Thej^ had a family of five chil- 
dren — Narcissa, wife of Francis E. Scott; Minerva, deceased, 
wife of J. E.. Robbins; Thomas G., Albert B. and John A. 
Albert B. Dunbar received a liberal education in the schools 
of Centreville. He was reared on the farm and is an enter- 
prising, public-spirited young man, a supporter of all lauda- 
ble enterprises. Politically he is a Republican, and a member 
of the Township Board of campaign management. He is 
a member of Woodard Lodge, No. 212, I. O. O. F. Dec. 15, 
1880, he was married to Almeda, daughter of Isaac P. and 
Rebecca (Commons) Lewis. She was born Dec. 21, 1856. 
Mrs. Dunbar's fither was born in South Carolina in 1804, 
and subsequently resided with his parents in Warren County, 
Ohio, where he married Rachel Waidrop, who died and he 



CENTRE TOWNSHIP. 331 

afterward married Rebecca Commons. Eight children were 
born to this union— Kathan, Ehner, Narcissa, Loretta, Al- 
meda, Eva, Perry and Oliver. 

Thomas G. Dunhar, grocer and dealer in hardware and 
farming implements, is a native of Wayne Co., Ind., born 
Dec. 21, 1848, the eldest son of James and Mary Dunbar, 
his father a native of Union County, Ind., and his mother of 
Oxford, Ohio. He was reared on a farm and educated in the 
district schools. On reaching his majority he engao'cd in 
running a saw-mill, continuing in that business till 1879, 
when he took charge of the American Hotel in Centreviile, 
and carried it on eighteen months. In 1882 he opened his 
present place of business in the old court-house building 
where he has built up a large and thriving trade. In 1872 
Mr. Dunbar was married to Sarah E., daughter of Joseph 
and Sarah King, of Wayne County. They have two children 
— Oris K. and Walter H. Mr. Dunbar is a member of Wood- 
ward Lodge, No. 154, I. O. O. F. 

John F. Dynes is a native of Warren County, Ohio, born 
July 14, 1848, a son of William H. and Marian Dynes. His 
parents moved to Delaware County, Ind., in 1849, where his 
mother died when he was four and his father when he was six 
years of age. He then lived with relatives a year, when he was 
bound to an Irish farmer named Mansfield, who was rough and 
unkind, and when fifteen years of age he ran away and enlisted 
in the One Hundred and Thirty-fourth Indiana Infantry (one 
hundred days' men). After serving four months he went to 
Union City, Ind., and learned the printer's trade, at which 
he worked two and a half years. He then worked on a farm 
eighteen months, and the next eighteen months worked at 
his trade in Indianapolis. In 1870 he returned to Delaware 
County, and married Cynthia J., daughter of William and 
Susannah Snodgrass, of Wayne County, and for eighteen 
months engaged in farming. He then moved to Indianapo- 
lis and for three and a half years was in the real-estate busi- 
ness. In June, 1875, he bought the farm in Centre Town- 
ship, WayncjCounty, where he now lives, containing eighty 
acres of choice land, well improved, and has since then given 
his exclusive attention to farming. Mr. and Mrs Dynes have 



332 HISTORY OF WAYNE COUNTY. 

five children— Charles E., Minnie M., William H., Earl M. 
and John F. 

Andrew J. Eliason, son of Richard and Harriett (McAllister) 
Eliason, was born in Wayne County, Ind., Feb. 5, 1834. His 
father was born in Delaware in 1802, and moved with his 
parents to Kentucky and thence to Wayne County, Ind., where 
he was married. He died at. the age of eighty-three years. 
His wife preceded him several years. Their children were — 
Levi, Mary A., James, John M., Andrew J., Martin, Betsy 
A., Sarah A., Joshua and William. Andrew J. remained 
with his parents till nearly thirty years of age, and March 19, 
1868, was married to Mary, daughter of Peter and Eliza 
(McGlothlin) Black. They have four children — Walter W., 
Harry, John C. and Irwin H. Mr. Eliason has a fine farm 
of 160 acres, and is one of the practical and successful farmers 
of Centre Township. Politically he is a Republican, His 
wife is a member of the Methodist Episcopal church. 

Jos/ma Eliason, Sr., a prominent farmer of Centre Town- 
ship, was born in New Castle County, Del., Jan. 14, 1805, a son 
of Joshua Eliason, a native of the same State, born in 1776. ' 
His parents came to Wayne County, Ind., in the fall of 1814, 
and first settled two miles northeast of Centre vi lie, in the un- 
broken forest. They built a rude cabin and commenced the 
struggle for a home. Many are tlie privations to be under- 
gone in clearing and improving a farm in a new country, 
but with undaunted zeal they labored on and reared tiieir 
family, giving them all the advantages afforded in the new 
country. They were members of the Baptist church and fore- 
most in having a church of their denomination established in 
their adopted home. The mother died in 1820. The father 
lived to be eighty-four years of age, passing away in 1860. 
They had a family of six children— William, died in 1884; 
Joshua, Levi, Lydia, wife of James Faulkner; Kittie, mar- 
ried James McAllister, both deceased; Betsey, married Ja- 
cob Park, both deceased. Joshua Eliason, the subject of this 
sketch, was reared on a pioneer farm, receiving a common- 
school education in the earl}'^ subscription schoofc. He was 
married in his twenty-fourth year to Lucinda, daughter of 
John King, of Wayne County. He soon after moved to 



CENTKE TOWJ!fSHIP. 333 

a farm, and has been extensively and successfully engaged in 
agricultural pursuits. He lias also been an extensive stock- 
raiser, dealing largely in cattle and hogs. For ten years he 
dealt in pork, packing and shipping large quantities to the 
larger cities. His farm contains 312 acres of choice land. 
His residence is a large, statelj' two-story brick surrounded 
with beautiful evergreens and shade trees. Mr. Eliason lost 
his wife, a most devoted Christian lady, Feb. 12, 1873. He 
has been a member of the Christian church over forty years, 
and has held the diiferent offices in the church, being always 
ready to sustain the banner of the cross. Politically, like his 
father before him, he has been a Whig and in later life a 
Republican. 

Joshua Eliason, Jr., was born in Wayne County, Ind., April 
14, 1841, a son of William and Harriet (McAlister) Eliason. 
He remained on the farm with his parents till manhood, receiv- 
ing a common-school education. In 1867 he was married to 
Mary, daughter of Oliver T. and Mary (King) Jones, of 
Wayne County. Three children have been born to them — 
Jessie, Zella and John. Mr. Eliason has thus far given his 
attention to agriculture and stock-raising. His farm con- 
tains 160 acres of fine land, with a good residence and farm 
buildings, fenced with hedge. Mrs. Eliason is a lady of cult- 
ure and refinement. She is a member of the Methodist 
church. Politically Mr. Eliason was reared a Whig, and is 
now a worker in the Republican party. 

T. G. £'liaso7iwas born in Wayne County, Ind., on the farm 
where he now resides, July 10, 1839, a son of Joshua and 
Martha (Crawford) Eliason. His father was a native of Dela- 
ware, and came to Wayne County, Ind., in 1814, and entered the 
quarter-section of land now occupied by his son T. C. The 
land was in the woods. He erected a log cabin and later in 
life built a double hewed-log house. His sons Thomas and 
Henry erected the present residence and farm buildings. He 
was politically a Whig and later in life a Republican. He 
lived to be nearly eighty-three years of age. He was twice 
married. T]^ the first marriage were born six children, three 
now living — Joshua, Levi and Lydia. Of the nine children 
born to the second marriage eight are living — Ebenezer, 



334 HISTORY OF WAYNE COUNTY. 

(deceased); Anna, wife of Samuel Townsend, of Fulton Co., 
Ind. ; Andrew; John, of Illinois; Marinda, wife of William 
Longfellow, of Tipton County, Ind.; Henry C, of Conners- 
ville, Ind. ; Martha, widow of Thomas McConaha; Lueinda, 
widow of Robert Grimes, and Thomas C. The mother died 
in her eighty-fourth year. T. C. Eliason received his educa- 
tion in the country schools. Soon after reaching manhood 
he became the owner of the home farm, where he was very suc- 
cessful till 1875. He then invested several thousand dollars 
in the Richmond Furniture Manufacturing Company, where 
he spent four years of his time and lost all he invested. Fie 
then returned to the farm, where he is now living. His 
farm is one of the best in the neighborhood, and is well 
drained bj 700 rods of tiling. He is a liberal supporter of all 
local enterprises of merit. Politically he is a Republican. 
He is a member of the Christian church. 

Homer Farlow VI Si&hoYXi in Union County, Ind., Dee. 23, 
1843, the third son of Stephen and Nancy (Leviston) Farlow, 
who were also natives of Union County. When he was ten 
years of age his father moved his family to Wayne County, 
and settled on the farm where our subject still resides, his 
father now living in Boston Township. Homer Farlow has 
followed farming through life, and has a farm of 194 acres of 
choice bottom land, with first-class buildings. He makes a 
specialty of breeding the Poland China hogs, and is classed 
among the successful cattle raisers of Centre Township. 
May 31, 1868, he was married to Eliza C. Railsback, a native 
of Wayne County, and daughter of the late Nathan Railsback. 
They are the parents of four children — Estella M., Bessie L. 
Nora and Percy. 

'Paul Frazer was born about the year 1791, near Philadel- 
phia, Pa. He was married to Catharine McPherson, who 
died in Pennsylvania, leaving four boys — Paul, John (who 
died in California in 1872), Franklin and McCord. After his 
wife's death Mr. Frazer moved in 1836, with his little sons, to 
Wayne County, Ind., and followed farming near Williamsburg 
for four 3'ears. He then sold his farm and bougat 160 acres 
south of Centreville. He was married a second time to Mary 
Ladd, a native of North Carolina, who died in 1873, leaving 



CENTRE TOWNSHIP. 335 

one dauofliter, Catharine, who is now keeping house for her 
brothers. The farm is now owned by the sons and daughter 
and contains 220 acres of land. Mr. Frazer was an honest, 
industrious and enterprising farmer. He died in August, 
1854. 

David Gentry^ Justice of the Peace, Centre Township, 
Wavne Co., Ind., was born in Madison County, Ky. , April 
2, 1808. He received a limited education in his native 
county; remained there till the fall of 1830, when he came to 
Wayne County and located three miles southwest of Centre- 
ville. In 1836 he moved to Centreville. In the fall that 
year he was elected Constable and served till 1844, when he 
was elected Sheriff of the county; held that position till 1848. 
From 1853 till 1858 he was in the general mercantile busi- 
ness, and from 1858 till 1866 in the grocery business. He 
was elected Justice of the Peace in 1863, and has now held 
the office twenty years. In Jane, 1830, Mr. Gentry was mar- 
ried to Jane Tilley, of North Carolina. She died March 24, 
1877. They had a family of four children; two daughters 
died in infancy. One son, William T., a graduate of West 
Point in the class of 1856, was appointed Second Lieutenant 
of the Fourth United States Infantry; was promoted to Cap- 
tain of the Nineteenth Infantry, and afterward to Major of 
the Ninth Infantry. April 12, 1884, he was promoted Colo- 
nel of the Twenty-fifth U. S. Infantry, now stationed at Fort 
Snelling, Minn. The other son, James H., was educated in 
his native town, and was for several years associated in busi- 
ness with his father. He was for two years a staff officer of 
Governor Morton. He was in the wholesale grocery business 
in Cincinnati, Ohio, three years, and since then has resided in 
Centreville, dealing extensively in real estate. He has been 
City Clerk since 1870. He was also connected with the Rich- 
mond Telegram ten years. In 1858 he was married to Sarah 
E., daughter of Henry and Anna M. Beitzell. They have 
three daughters — Blanche, Irene and Jennie B. 

Peter ^-'oz^er, deceased, was born in Lynchburgh, Ya., Jan. 
18, 1801. He left his native city for Somerset County, Pa., 
where he remained till he grew to manhood. He then went 
to Maryland, where he was married to Eliza Chaney, and to 



336 HISTORY OF WAYJSTE COUNTY. 

them were born two children — William H., and Mary E., 
wife of John A. Shadie. In the spring of 1834 he came to 
Wayne Countj^ Ind., and bought a farm about two miles 
south of Centrcville, where he farmed till 1857. He then 
sold his farm and bought the place now occupied by William 
H. Gower. His death occurred in July, 1882, and his wife 
died in 1866. His son William H. was born in April, 1831, 
in Maryland. He came to Wayne County, Ind., when about 
three years of age, where he was reared. He was married in 
October, 1866, to Sarah F., daughter of John and Sarah 
Jones. They have one son — Charles W. Soon after his mar- 
riage William settled upon his present farm, which contains 
192 acres, most of which is under cultivation. 

Thaddeus C. Greene^ deceased, was born in Huiitsville, 
Ala., June 5, 1835, a son of Thomas B. and Eda (Dodge) 
Greene. When he was a child his father died, and his edu- 
cation was therefore limited to the common schools of his 
native State. When he was ten years of age his mother, 
with her five children, removed to Liberty, Union Co., Ind., 
and it was there and in Wayne County that Thaddeus C. 
grew to manhood. He subsequently went to Abington, 
Wayne County, and served an apprenticeship at the carriage- 
maker's trade, and became an intelligent and skillful work- 
man. He remained at Abington till the breaking out of the 
war of the Rebellion, when he was one of the first to respond to 
the call for troops, enlisting as a private in Company A, Eighth 
Indiana Infantry, for three months. He was actively engaged 
during his term of service and was discharged Aug. 6, 1861. 
He returned home and worked at his trade till Aug. 5, 1862, 
when he again enlisted and was assigned to duty in the Nine- 
teenth Indiana Battery, and served till the last gun was fired; 
was discharged June 10, 1865. He participated in the battles 
of Perry ville,Cliickamauga, Mission Ridge, Kennesaw Mount- 
ain, Peach Tree Creek, New Hope Church, Jonesboro, and 
many others of less note. As a soldier he never shirked any 
duty, however irksome or dangerous it might be. Brave 
and intr.epid, he won the confidence and esteem of his superi- 
ors, and with his comrades in the ranks he was a general 
favorite, on account of his obliging and genial disposition. 



CENTRE TOWNSHIP. 337 

After his return home he worked at his trade till Oct. 6, 1866, 
when he lost both hands by the premature discharge of a 
cannon. May 30, 1867, he married Martha E., daughter of 
Enoch and Martha Coddington, of Union County, Ind. They 
had one child— Dotha L. They lived in Abington a year 
after their marriage and then removed to Centre ville, Mr. 
Greene having received the appointment of Postmaster, a 
position he held four years. He joined Abington Lodge, Xo. 
154, I. O. O. F., in 1864, and at the time of his death was a 
member of Hoosier Lodge, No. 23, Centreville. He was a 
faithful member of his order, and practiced in his daily life 
the principles advocated in the lodge. Generous, sociable 
and confiding, he won an enviable place in the estimation of 
his fellowmen. Correct and prompt in his business transac- 
tions, he left a reputation worthy of imitation. Politically 
he was a Republican, always voting with that partj' upon all 
National issues. He cared nothing for official honors, prefer- 
ring to attend to his own personal business affairs. He died 
March 8, 1880. Immediately after Mr. Greene's death, Mrs. 
Greene received the appointment of Postmistress of Centre- 
ville, a position she still holds. She has conducted the affairs 
of the office in an able manner, and justly deserves the appre- 
ciation of the public. 

Caleb J. Harvey was born on the farm where he now re- 
sides, in Wayne County, Ind., March 26, 1843. His grand- 
father, John Harvey, was born in Guilford County, N. C, 
of English parents, in May, 1779, and there married Jane 
Cox, also of English descent, born March 3, 1782. In 1812 
• he removed to Wayne County, Ind., and entered 320 acres of 
land on Nolan's Fork, for which he paid $1.50 an acre. At 
that time the Indians frequently drove the settlers from their 
homes, and the latter built a block-house on Mr. Harvey's 
land, where they could take refuge in time of threatened dan- 
ger. John Harvey died Sept. 12, 1850, and his wife, April 
16, 1854. To them were born nine children; but two are 
living — Nathan, of Topeka, Kan., and William E., of Mis- 
souri. The deceased are — Rebecca, Isoin, Benjamin, Aaron, 
John P., Mary E. and Jane A. John P. Harvey was born 
in Wayne County, Ind., April 16, 1819. He was educated 



338 HISTORY OF WAYNE COUNTY. 

in the log cabin scliools, and the school at Cambridge City 
taught by Samuel Iloshour. March 18, 1841, he was married 
to Sallie, daughter of Caleb B. and Olive (Leonard) Jackson, 
of Wayne County. She was born in Gravson County, Ya., 
in 1818. John P. Harvey became the owner of the entire 
tract of land entered by his father and was a successful fanner 
and business man. He died Feb. 19, 1852. Mrs. Harvey 
resides on the old homestead with her son Caleb J. Harvey. 
Their children are five in number — Jemima, wife of Oliver 
Draper, of Henry County, Ind.; Caleb J.; Olive J., widow of 
Robert Commons; Marinda C, wife of Ennis Kitterman, and 
John C. Caleb J. received his early education in the schools 
of Centre ville and subsequently attended Earlham College. 
When quite young the care of the farm devolved on him and 
he early learned the science of agriculture and sto^k-raising. 
He is thoroughly practical in all his management and has 
been successful in his chosen life-work. Politically he is a 
Republican. In April, 1880, he was elected Trustee of Cen- 
tre Township, a position he still fills. He is a member of 
Hoosier Lodge, No. 23, and Hebron Encampment, No. 8, L O. 
O. F., of Centreville, and has passed all the chairs of both 
bodies, and represented the two in the Grand Assembly of 
the State. Jan. 23, 1867, Mr. Harvey was married to Katie, 
daughter of Andrew and Matilda (Worl) Hoover. They have 
two daughters — Sadie M. and Olive I. 

Jesse Homey, farmer, stock-raiser and wool-grower, Centre 
Township, was born in Wayne County, Ind., July 29, 1843, a 
son of Stephen and Nancy (Williams) Horney. He was 
reared on a farm, receiving his education in the country 
schools. In December, 1863, he enlisted in the One Hundred 
and Twenty-first Indiana Infantry, Ninth Corps, as a private. 
He participated in the battles at Pulaski, Wilson Pike and 
Little Harpeth, Tenn., Hollow Tree Gap, where the com- 
mand met with a heavy loss; also in the severe battle of Frank- 
lin, where he had a horse shot from under him; in the battle 
at Granny White's Pike; two days' battle at Nashville, Law- 
renceburg, Florence and Sugar Creek. At the latter battle 
his horse was killed by solid shot from cannon. During 
the summer of 1864 their headquarters were at Pulaski, 



CENTRE TOWNSHIP. 339 

Tenn,, and they scouted the country for 100 ^miles around. 
He was discharged at Yicksburg, Miss., in August, 1865. 
After his return home he engaged in farming with his father. 
In January, 1868, he settled on his present farm, which con- 
tains 160 acres of weli-improved land, and has one of the best 
springs of water in the county. He is an enterprising and 
successful farmer. In politics he is a Republican. Sept. 13, 
1867, he was married to Martha E., daughter of George G. 
and Mary Hindman. She was a member of the Christian 
church. She died Dec. 10, 1870. March 19, 1874, Mr. 
Horney married Xancy, daughter of John and Catherine 
(Wise) Hoover. Mrs. Horney is a member of the United 
Brethren church. 

Caleb B. Jackson^ a son of Joseph Jackson, was born Dec. 
20, 1844, on the old homestead, in Centre Township. Feb. 
19, 1873, he was married to Lizzie Strickland, daughter 
of R. J. and Ann Strickland. They have a daughter, 
four years of age. Mr. Jackson was reared in his native 
county, and for a number of years was prominently identi- 
fied with her business interests. He is at present a resi- 
dent of Kansas City, Mo., where he is an extensive dealer in 
coal, wood, flour and feed, his business being both wholesale 
and retail. 

Cajptain Caleb B. Jackson^ one of the most prominent 
farmers of the township, was born on the farm where he re- 
sides, two miles west of Centre ville, Ind., April 16, 1833. 
His father, Caleb B. Jackson, was born in Grayson County, 
Ya., Dec. 20, 1793, and was married soon after attaining his 
majority to Olive Leonard, a native of North Carolina. In 
the fall of 1818 he moved to Wayne County, Ind., erected a rude 
log cabin in the woods, and with his wife and three children 
commenced the life of a pioneer. He cleared and cultivated 
a farm, on whicli he lived till his death, Nov. 30, 1854. He 
reared a family of seven children — Marinda, afterward Mrs. 
Joseph Shank; Joseph W.; Malinda, afterward Mro. James 
King; Sarah H., afterward Mrs. J. P. Harvey; William L., 
a resident of Knox County, Mo. ; Jemima, wife of William 
King, and Caleb B. Our subject received such education as 
was afibrded by the subscription schools of his day. He was 



340 HISTORY OF WAYNE COUNTY. 

married Jane 19, 1851, to Vasliti, daughter of John and 
Mehitable Cnim, and settled on the old homestead with his 
parents. At the breaking out of the Rebellion he began re- 
cruiting Boldiers for the Union army, and in 1863 raised a 
company, of which he was elected Captain. They were im- 
mediately sent to the front and assigned to the command of 
General Sherman. They participated in the battle of Buz- 
zard's, Roost, and many skirmishes, and at one time fought 
coutinuously 100 days. In 1865 Captain Jackson was dis- 
charged on account of disability, and returned to the farm. 
He has paid especial attention to raising fine stock. He 
was one of the first men to introduce short horn cattle into 
the county, and his Poland China hogs are the finest that 
can be obtained. He has of late turned his attention to the 
breeding of Jersey cattle and has one of the finest herds in 
the county. His bull, Black Bronx, No. 7,450, is a solid mul- 
berry color, and a full brother to Hazen's Bess, No. 7,329, a 
cow now owned by Charley Crockett, of Richmond. Another 
fine bull is a silver gray named Reed's Farm Glory, No. 
5,457. He also has paid considerable attention to breeding 
and training horses. Black Friend, a horse of wliich he is 
quite"proud, can justly be called "the pride of the State." Cap- 
tain Jackson's farm contains 467 acres of the choicest land in 
Indiana, lying on or near the waters of Nolan's Fork. His 
residence stands on the summit of Jackson's Hill, and com- 
mands a fine view of the surrounding country in every direc- 
tion. He is a man of progress, and is always one of the first 
to put forward any enterprise of public benefit, never consid- 
ering his own interests when his county or township is to be 
advanced. He is a member of the Masonic fraternity and of 
Hoosier Lodge, No. 23, I. O. O. F. He has never used liquor 
or tobacco in any form, and does not know one card from an- 
other. Although a member of no church, he is strictly moral, 
and lends his assistance to the upbuilding of all religious and 
moral reforms. He and his family are attendants of the 
Christian church. Captain Jackson has a family of four 
cliildren — Sarah J., the wife of Samuel Bronneburg, of Madi- 
son County, Ind. ; Thomas E., married Carrie Libold; Flavius 
J.; Alice, now Mrs. Charles Eliason. 



CENTRE TOWNSHIP. 341 

Charles F. Jackson^ the seventh son of Joseph W. and 
Mary Jackson, was born in Centre Township, Wayne Co., 
Ind., April 3, 1857. He received a good common-school ed- 
ucation. He was reared on a farm, and on arriving at matur- 
ity engaged in that vocation for himself He now owns 173 
acres of the best land in Centre Township, situated on No- 
lan's Creek. He is also a successful stock-raiser, making a 
specialty of short-horn cattle. When twenty-four years of 
age he was married to Melissa C. Sealock, daughter of James 
and Hannah Sealock. She was born in Wayne Countv, Ind., 
May 12, 1862. Mr. and Mrs. Jackson have one son — Gar- 
field. 

Lafayette Jackson^' iQxmQ,T, was born in Wayne County, 
Ind., Jan. 3, 1851, the fifth son of Joseph W. and Mary (Har- 
vey) Jackson. He was reared on the home farm attend in o- 
the country schools, and subsequently a term at Earlham Col- 
lege. He now owns a fine farm of 250 acres of land on ISTo- 
lan's Fork, and is engaged in both general farming and 
stock-raising. He is one of the enterprising young farmers 
of the township, and a practical business man. In politics 
he affiliates with the Kepublican party. In January, 1879, 
Mr. Jackson was married to Lizzie, daughter of John F. and 
Caroline (Abraham) Medaris, of Wayne County, her father 
of English and her mother of German descent. Mr. and 
Mrs. Jackson have three children — Arthur G., Fannie S. and 
Mary C. 

Johii Jo7ies, Cashier of the First National Bank, Centre- 
ville, Ind., was born in Wayne County, Ind., Feb. 8, 1844, 
a son of Oliver T. and Mary (King) Jones. He is a repre- 
sentative of one of the oldest and most influential as well as 
wealthy families of the county. He was educated in the 
common schools, remaining on the farm till after attaining 
his majority. On leaving the farm he was appointed Assist- 
ant Cashier, under his father, of the First National Bank, and 
retained the position till the death of his father, when he suc- 
ceeded him as Cashier. He was married in 1878 to Addie, 
daughter of Henry and Caroline Stigleman. They have one 
son — Percy O. Mr. Jones is a plain, unassuming man, and 
has never aspired to political honors, although at present he 
is Treasurer of the City Board of Centreville. , 



3^2 HISTORY OF WAYNE COUNTY. 

Lincoln Hamlin Joues was born on the farm where he 
now resides, one mile north of Centrevil e Ind., Jan. 10, 
1860, a sou of Oliver T. and Mary (King) Jones. He re- 
ceived a liberal education, and having been reared on a farm 
has become familiar with all the details of the busmess, and 
bids tair to be a successful rival of any far.ner in the county. 
He was married Nov. 30, 1882, to Ada, daughter of Thomas 
and Louisa J. (Study) Edwards, of Wayne County. They 
have one daughter-Edna M. Mrs. Jones's mother is a na- 
tive of Indiana. Her father is a native of Wales, and came 
to the United States about forty-five years ago. He is by 
trade a millwright, and has worked in a number of mills m 
Wayne County. At present he is living at Williamsburg, 
having retired from business. He is a member of the Ma- 
sonic fraternity. . t^ u 

Hon Oliver T. Jones, deceased, was born in Kanawha 
County, Ya., Sept. 19, 1810, a son of Levi and Mary 
(Thomas) Jones. He was of Welsh descent, his great- 
arandparents coming to the United States from Wales and set- 
Sing in East Virginia when the colonies were under British 
rule'' His grandfathers, John Jones and Joseph Thomas, 
were soldiers in the war of the Revolution, and subsequently 
received pensions. They settled in Kanawha County in 1782, 
and there Levi Jones was born and remained till ISU, when 
he immigrated to Indiana Territory and settled in what is 
now Wavne County. He was married to Mary Thomas in 
1804. His death occurred in 1823. Oliver T. Jones was thus 
reared in Wayne County and here spent his life, and was 
identified with all her interests. In his early life he taught 
school, and worked on the farm and at brick-making seven 
years In the meantime he was Collector of the State and 
county revenues two years. From 1839 till 1844 inclusive 
served as Justice of the Peace, and during the same period 
was County School Examiner. In 1844 he removed to the 
farm a mile north of CentreviUe, where he spent the remain- 
der of his days. He was one of the charter members and 
the first President of the CentreviUe National Bank, estab- 
lished in 1863. He was for several years its Cashier, serving 
iu that capacity at the time of his death. Long before Mr. 



CENTRE TOWNSHIP. 343 

Jones attained his majority he espoused the political faith of 
the old Whig party, and zealously advocated its principles till 
its dissolution, when he adhered as faithfully to the Republi-' 
can party. In 1860 he was elected to represent Wayne 
County in the Legislature, and re-elected in 1862. He also 
attended an extra session held in 1863, at which he resigned, 
as the body as a majority refused to indorse and support Gov- 
ernor Morton in his loyal course toward the General Govern- 
ment. As a Representative he was firm in his adherence to 
the principles he considered right and to the interests of those 
who had reposed confidence in him, and to him is accorded a 
high place among prominent men and politicians of Wayne 
County. Noble, generous, honest, he won the confidence and 
esteem of all who knew him. In the fall of 1863 he was 
elected one of the Board of Commissioners of Wayne County, 
and served nine years. He was for several years Treasurer of 
Centre Township. March 17, 1838, he was married to Mary, 
daughter of John and Judith (Roundtree) King, who came to 
Wayne County from Kentucky in 1828. Their children 
were twelve in number— Joseph, died at the age of nineteen 
years; Jane, deceased, wife of J. M. Eliason ; Elmira, wife 
of J. S. Russell; John K., Cashier of Centreville National 
Bank; Lucinda, wife of Joshua Eliason, Jr.; Martha, wife of 
S.G.Smith; Levi M., of Richmond; Anna, wife of Lewis 
Shute, of Preble County, Ohio; William H.; Emily, de- 
ceased, wife of W. C. Shute, Preble County, Ohio; Charles 
W. D., Teller First National Bank, Cambridge City, Ind.; 
Lincoln H., residing on the home farm. Mr. Jones^ died 
Dec. 16, 1874. He had been a member of the Christian 
church fifteen years, and an Elder of the church four years. 
Mrs. Jones has been a member of the same church thirty- 
seven years. She is residing with her son, Lincoln, on the 
old homestead. 

Washington Jones, farmer, Etna Township, Whitley Co., 
Ind., postoflace Hecla, was born a mile north of Centreville, 
Wayne Co., Ind., Dec. 8, 1816, three days before the 
State was admitted into the Union. His father, Levi Morris 
Jones, was born in Culpeper County, Ya., Oct. 10, 1785, and 
emigrated from Culpeper County to Kanawha County with 



344 HISTORY OF WAYNE COUNTY. 

his father, John Jones, in 1797. His mother, Mary (Thomas) 
Jones, was born in Buckingham County, Va., Feb. 7, 1784, 
and in October, 1797, moved with her father to Kanawha 
County, where, March, 1806, she was married to Levi M. 
Jones. John Jones and Joseph Thomas were both of Welsh 
descent; both were soldiers in the Revolutionary war, the 
latter directly under command of General Washington, and 
neither would receive a pension from the Government, say- 
in o" they fought from principle, not for money. John Jones 
liad a family of ten children, eight sons and two daughters, 
and Joseph Thomas twelve, five sons and seven daughters. 
Levi Jones and his family moved to Wayne County, Ind., in 
April, 1815, and bought a quarter-section one mile north of 
Centreville, which he afterward sold, and bought town lots 
in Centreville, where he erected buildings and kept public 
house several years. He died in Centreville, Oct. 5, 1823. 
His wife died Sept. 20, 1848. Their son, Eli R. Jones, born 
March 17, 1818, was the first male child born in the town of 
Centreville. Levi Jones at his death left a family of ten 
children, the eldest fifteen years of age and the youngest six 
months. After the estate was settled they found themselves 
$500 in debt. This Mrs. Jones paid oflr, in addition to rearing 
her family. Washington Jones worked for his three elder 
brothers until he was nineteen years of age, receiving no 
wao-es aside from his rough clothing and board. He then 
bought a quarter-section of land in Madison County, Ind., 
from them, for $280, paying for it in monthly payments of $9 
each, losing but two work days until it was paid for. He 
then bought eighty acres in Tipton County, Ind., for $200, 
which he paid for in the same way. He then thought he had 
enough land, and spent his earnings in improving a lot in 
Centreville. He spent $1,400 on the lot and improvements, 
and sold it for $900. With $600 he bought a quarter-section 
in Whitley County ,which to-day is worth $8,000. Mr. Jones' 
early education was detained in the subscription schools, but, 
his mother being poor, he attended very little before the days 
of public schools. He was obliged to stay at home and 
work, but he managed to keep up with his schoolmates. 
When in his twenty-first year he attended school three 



CENTRE TOWNSHIP. 345 

months, day and night, his brother, O. T. Jones, beino- 
the teacher, and learned more than in all his previous attend- 
ance. In his twenty-second year he began teaching, and 
taught the next six winters. Governor Morton's wife was a 
pupil in one of his schools. Jan. 20, 1845, Mr. Jones was 
married to Catherine Hunt, daughter of Colonel Smith 
Hunt, of Wayne County. They had two children — Mary 
Jane and Hannah Eliza, both deceased. His wife died Nov. 
6, 1852, and Oct. 2, 1853, he was married to Mrs. Frances M. 
Hart, a sister of his first wife. They had three sons — Levi 
Monroe, Washington Thomas and Oliver Perry, all living. 
Mrs. Jones died in September, 1873, and Oct. 8, 1874, Mr. 
Jones married Mrs. Semantha C. Trumbull. He first settled 
and commenced housekeeping in Centreville, Feb. 1, 1845, 
and followed farming and brick-making till Aug. 29, 1848, 
when he left Wayne County, and Sept. 5 landed in Whitley 
County. When he was ready to leave Wayne County he 
said to his brothers (six of whom were present): "Boys, this 
looks rather tough, that a man should be driven from his 
native land by poverty, but I'm going, and if any of you 
should ever come to see me you will find me trying to fix my- 
self comfortable in life, and if I never get so fixed, I shall die 
trying." His old friend, Eleazer Malone, was present and 
said he would soon sins:, "Carry me back to Old Virginia." 
But he told him he should stay long enough to build himself 
a good home, and asked him if he would come and build it 
(Mr. Malone was a brick-mason). He said that he would, 
and thirteen years from that day Mr. Jones wrote him he was 
ready to build, telling him the day he wished him to be there, 
and true to his promise he was there and did the work. 
When Mr. Jones started in life he set a mark to work up to, 
and has been working to that end. He is now comfortably 
settled. He has served four years as Justice of the Peace, 
two terms as Township Trustee, one as Assessor, and was 
once elected County Commissioner, but did not serve. In 
politics he was first a Whig, and when the Republican party 
was organized enlisted under its banner, and continues one 
of its firm adherents. In religious faith he is a Baptist, 
kaving been a member of that denomination since the winter of 
23 



346 HISTORY OF WAYNE COCTNTY. 

1849. He is opposed to all secret societies, is strictly temperate, 
using neither liquor nor tobacco, and is in favor of prohibition 
and equal rights for all. He was the first person to introduce full 
blooded Durham cattle into the county; put on the first slate 
roof in the county; put up the first artificial fountain and the 
first woven wire fence and automatic gates in the county. 
He has been a liberal, public-spirited man, and all enterprises 
of benefit to the county have felt the power of his influence 
and approval. 

Caleh W. King is a son of James "W. D., and Malinda 
(Jackson) King. His grandfiither, John King, moved from 
Kentucky to Wayne County, Ind., with his family, in 1824, 
James being at that time twelve years old. The latter died 
at the age of nfty-two years. His widow died in 1879. They 
were the parents of eleven children — John W., died in in- 
fancy; Olive, wife of J. W. Boyd, of Newton, III; Caleb W.; 
William S., of Kansas City, Mo.; Joseph J.; Judith E., wife 
of John Myers; Eliza, wife of Jesse Stevens; Sarah M., wife 
of William Smith; James C; Lucinda, wife of Charles 
Staats, arid Mark P. Caleb W. King was born in Wayne 
County, Ind., Nov. 2, 1838. He obtained a liberal business 
education at the High School of Centreville, and when nine- 
teen 3^ears of age began teaching school, which he followed 
nine winters, i'arming during the summer. He was married in 
1861 to Adaline, daughter of John F. and Caroline (Abrams) 
Medaris. She lived but fourteen months after her marriage, 
and in 1866 Mr. King married Lydia E., daughter of R )bert 
and Ilachel Bond. They had two sons — Walter S. and 
Lewis E. Mrs. King died in 1879. She was a member of 
the Society of Friends. Feb. 27, 1884, Mr. King married 
Miss Lucinda Townsend, daughter of Samuel and Anna 
Townsend, of Fulton County, Ind. Mr. King is a member 
of the Christian church. He has been Justice of the Peace 
eight years, and is an influential man in the township. His 
farm contains 275 acres of well-improved land, with a com- 
modious brick residence and good farm buildings. 

John L King was born in Wayne County, Ind., Sept. 26, 
1847, the eldest son of Joseph and Sarah (Way) King, his 
mother a daughter of Seth Way, an early settler of Wayne 



CENTRE TOWNSHIP. 347 

County. He was educated in the district schools and Centre- 
ville College, obtaining a good business education. Feb. 
22, 1882, he was married to Rena, daughter of Frank and 
Naomi (Lewis) Beverlin, of Jay County, Ind. He then set- 
tled on a farm of 160 acres, formerlj'^ known as the John 
Maxwell farm, where he is successfully engaged in farming 
and stock-raising. He is politically a Republican. He is a 
member of Hoosier Lodge, No. 23, and Hebron Encamp- 
ment, No. 8, I. O. O. F., Centreville, and has passed all the 
chairs in both bodies. 

Joseph King^ deceased, was born in Kentucky, July 7, 
1821, and when seven years of age, in 1828, came with his 
parents, John and Judith (Roundtree) King, to Wayne 
County, Ind., and settled a mile and a half north of Centre- 
ville. There were in his father's family nine children — Lu- 
cinda, married Joshua Eliasoii; James, married a daughter 
of Caleb Jackson ; Joseph; William, married a daughter of 
Caleb Jackson; Mary, married Oliver T. Jones; Presley, mar- 
ried a daughter of Ebenezer Cheesman; Nanc}'-, married J. 
M. Maxwell; Jackson, married Elizabeth Davis; Jesse died 
at the age of fourteen years. Joseph King grew to manhood 
on his father's farm, receiving a good business education 
under the tutelage of Samuel Hoshour, of Centreville, and 
subsequently became the owner of the home farm. Feb. 27, 
1845, he was married to Sarah Way, who was born in Wayne 
(younty, Ind., July 20, 1826, a daughter of Seth and Sarah 
(Cranor) Way. To them were born a family of nine chil- 
dren — Eliza J., wife of John Merritt; John L. ; Elizabeth, 
wife of Thomas Dunbar; William J., died, aged seven years; 
Lucinda, wife of W. S. Eliason; Martha A., died, aged six 
years; Joseph S., Walter J. and Dora B. Mr. King was 
one of the practical and progressive farmers of Wayne 
County. Politically he was a Republican, as are all of his 
sons. He was a member of the Christian church. He died 
Dec. 28, 1867. Mrs. King's parents came to Wayne County 
from North Carolina in 1810. To them were born eight chil- 
dren — Thomas, Lydia, Hannah, Betsey, Seth, Charlotte, 
Joshua and Sarah. 

Joseph L. King was born in Wayne County, Ind., Nov. 
10, 1848, a son of Lorenzo D, and Betsey (Way) King, and a 



348 HISTORY OF WATNE COUNTY. 

grandson of Jesse King. His father came to Wayne County 
with his parents when nineteen years of age, in 1824. He 
was married in 1827 to Betsey, daughter of Seth and Sarah 
(Oranor) Way. Seth Way settled in Williamsburg in 1810, 
and while living in the block-house, Aug. 2, 1812, Betsey 
was born. She is still living, and attends to her own house. 
She is the mother of eleven children — Seth, Rebecca, Will- 
iam, Hannah A., Lydia E., Absalom, Sarah, Joseph L., 
Andrew J., Margaret E. and an infant, unnamed. Joseph 
L. King grew to manhood on his father's farm, receiving a 
fair business education. He was married in 1870 to OUie, 
daughter of Walter G. and Martha (Jeffries) Stephens. Mrs. 
King was born in Wayne County, Ind., in 1849, and received 
a liberal education. Mr. and Mrs. King have three children 
— Lizzie J., Mary G. and Nora Z. They are members of 
the Methodist Episcopal church. Mr. King has a fine farm 
of ninety-eight acres on Nolan's Fork, 

William F.. King, M. Z>., is a native of the District of 
Columbia, born April 19, 1824. His father, Francis Iting, 
was also a native of Columbia, His mother, Eliza (Thorpe) 
King, was a native of Fairfax County, Ya., but when a child 
went to the District of Columbia with her parents, and was 
there married. In 1835 Francis King moved to Richmond, 
Indiana, and in 1837 to Centreville, and from that year till 
1844 was in the Clerk's office. After the creation of the of- 
fice, he served as County Auditor five years. He then moved 
to Indianapolis, where his wife died in 1860, and he in 1865. 
Seven of their nine children are living. William F. King 
received a common-school education, and when fifteen years 
of age went to Richmond to learn the printer's trade in the 
old Jeffersonian office. He worked at the trade till 1847, 
when he began the study of medicine. He was elected Jus- 
tice of the Peace in 1852, and served four years. He then 
located in Williamsburg and practiced his profession two 
years. In 1863 he entered the army as Surgeon of the One 
Hundred and Twenty-fourth Indiana Infantry, and served 
two years, the greater part of the time under General Sher- 
man. At the close of the war, in 1865, he was mustered out, 
and returned to Centreville, where he has built up a large 



CENTRE TOWNSHIP. " 349 

practice. He is one of the best physicians in the county 
and his practice is not confined to the city where he lives, 
but extends for miles around, wherever he is known. He is 
a member of the Wayne County Medical Society, He was 
one of the first members, and the oldest surviving member 
of Hoosier Lodge, No. 23, I. O. O. F. He is at present a 
member of the Town Board. He was married in 1851 to 
Hannah E. Maule. They have four children — Emily, a teacher 
in the Centreville schools; Frank, Helen and Alice. 

Solomon D. Kitterman^ farmer and stock-raiser, Centre 
Township, was born March 23, 1836. His parents, Philip and 
S irah (Sowers) Kittennan, were natives of Floyd C )anty, Ya. 
They were married in their native county and remained there 
till 1830, when they moved to Ohio, and three years later to 
Wayne County, Ind. They bought a farm a mile south of Pen- 
hook, where the mother died in 1861 and the father in 1866. 
They had a family of seven children, two of whom have 
died since their parents — Sophia, Joseph, Elizabeth, Rhoda, 
Julia Ann, Aaron and Solomon D. The latter still lives 
on the old homestead. He has never married, his sister 
Elizabetli keeping house for him. They have a good farm of 
130 acres, well improved. The residence, a two-story brick, 
was built by their father in 1819. The farm buildings were 
also built by their father. Mr. Kitterman is a successful 
farmer and stock-raiser and a prominent and popular man of 
his township. 

JohriT. Lashley was born in Centreville, Ind., Aug. 27, 
1845, a son of Daniel and Caroline (Douglass) Lashley. His 
father was born in Montgomery County, Md., Feb. 22, 1807. 
His mother was born in Washington, D. C, Jan. 18, 1811, 
and was married in her native city Oct. 9, 1837. The follow- 
ing year they moved to Centreville, Ind., where they kept a 
liotel thirty years, till after the removal of the county seat to 
Richmond, when they abandoned the business. Mr. Lashley 
died Feb. 19, 1874. His widow is still living in the house 
once used as a hotel. They had a family of nine children — 
Edward D., Arnold, Elizabeth E., Mary A., JohnT., Samuel 
H., Helen J,, Sarah G. and Rachel C. The mother is a de- 
voted member of the Methodist Episcopal church. John T. 



350 HISTOKY OF WAYNE COUNTY. 

Lashley is a member of the firm Lashley Brothers, extensive 
farmers and stock-raisers. They have two large farms, one 
north and the other south of Centreville. His brother, Sam- 
uel Lashley, was born Nov. 13, 1847, and Dec. 25, 1877, was 
married to Emma F,, daughter of David B. Beeson, of Wayne 
County. 

Henry C. Leeson, grocer, Centreville, was born Aug. 5, 
1841, near Jacksonburg, Wayne Co., Ind. ; lived there until 
the year 1857, when he went to Dublin, being influenced by 
the high grade to which the public schools had been raised, 
and was a pupil during four terms. During vacation he was 
always found in some employment or other endeavoring to 
make the expenses of his parents in his education as light as 
possible. During the winter of 1860 and '61 he tried his 
hand in learning the young ideas how to shoot. Was suc- 
cessful to a remarkable extent, it being his first efibrt. When 
Fort Sumter was fired upon then everything personal was 
forgotten. All aspirations for the future were dropped and 
nothing could be done; but, being a minor, was prevented 
from enlisting immediately. He responded to the second 
call of Lincoln and enlisted Aug. 20, 1861, as private, in 
Company C, Eighth Indiana Infantry, serving three years, 
not having received a furlough during the time, and, with 
the exception of two short spells of sickness, was always ready 
for duty. He was discharged as Second Sergeant — having 
been in all the battles that the regiment was engaged in, viz.: 
Pea Ridge, Mo., Raymond, Champion Hills, Jackson, Miss., 
siege of Yicksburg and many others. It may not be out of 
place to say that there are not many regiments that saw the 
services of the Eighth. After returning home he took a 
thorough course in the Miami Commercial College of Dayton, 
Ohio. In 1866 he assisted his father in the office of the 
Clerk of Wayne Circuit Court. In 1867 he purchased the 
grocery stock of the estate of Levi Fox. His father, Moses 
D. Leeson, was boru in Harrison Township, Wayne Co., 
Ind., Nov. 16, 1818. Having^ received a fair education at 
the common schools of the day, he taught school with great 
success until 1842, when he purchased a stock of goods in 
Jacksonburg, where he conducted a large business, continu- 



CENTRE TOWNSHIP. 351 

ing iu Jacksonbnrg until 1857, when he moved to Dublin, 
superintending the business of J. & C. A. Leeson until 1862. 
When the call for more troops by Lincoln was made he en- 
listed in the Fifth Indiana Cavalry and served to the close 
of the war, a faithful soldier and a beloved officer. He re- 
ceived four promotions, entering as a Lieutenant and rising to 
the position of Major. He was a bold and fearless officer, 
leaving a good record. In 1866 he was appointed Clerk of 
Wayne Circuit Court to fill vacancy caused by the death of 
Samuel B. Slagle, serving until the election of his successor. 
Retiring from office he remained with his son, our subject, 
in the store until August, 1877, when he was stricken with 
paralysis, lingering helpless for six years and five months, 
dying on the 19th day of January, 1884. His wife was Eliza- 
beth Mundell, a native of Peru, mother of five children, three 
of whom still survive. Richard Leeson, the grandfather of 
Henry C. Leeson, was a native of Kentucky, emigrating to 
Wayne County in about the year 1814, settling near Jackson- 
burg. He was a tanner by trade and carried on in connec- 
tion with the tannery a farm of 300 acres. He was a soldier 
in what was known as the Ohio Militia, under General Win- 
gate. He raised a family of eleven children, of whom Moses 
D. Leeson is the first to break the band. 

Mark Maudlin was born in Wayne County, Ind., Sept. 6, 
1826, the eldest son of John and Rebecca Maudlin. He was 
reared on a farm, but when twenty years of age commenced 
learning the carpenter's trade. He has worked at his 
trade faithfully, and is now one of the principal contractors 
of Centreville and vicinity. In August, 1851, Mr. Maudlin 
was married to Betsey A., daughter of Andrew Meredith, of 
Wayne County. They have two children — James A., and 
Sarah A., wife of Walter S. Commons. Mr. Maudlin is Per- 
manent Secretary and is one of the Trur-tees of Hoosier 
Lodge, No. 23, I. O. O. F., and Treasurer of Hebron Encamp- 
ment, No. 8, I. O. O. F. In religious faith he is a Friend. 
He is the Republican nominee for County Commissioner in 
the middle district. 

Oeorge McConaha, a young and enterprising farmer and 
stock-raiser of Centre Township, was born Jan. 8, 1857, a son 



352 HISTORY OF WAYNE COUNTY. 

of Thomas and Christina McConaha. He received a com- 
mon-school education, and on arriving at manhood began 
farming for himself. He owns a fine farm of 240 acres, lying 
on both sides of INolan's Creek. He has been a successful 
wheat-grower and stock-raiser; is a man of good judgment, 
sagacious and shrewd in his business dealings. He was 
married Sept. 30, 1880, to Sallie Jackson, daughter of Joseph 
W. and Mary E. Jackson. 

Simon McOonaha was born in Wayne County, Ind., Jan. 
13, 1852. His father, Thomas M. McConaha, was a native 
of Virginia, and when a boy came with liis parents to Wayne 
County, Ind., and settled three miles south of Centreville. 
He was an extensive farmer and stock-dealer, owning a whole 
section of land. He was a very successful manager, and a 
good citizen. He married Christina Kramer, of Butler Countyj 
Ohio. They had seven children — Barbary, Lewis, Taylor, 
Simon, George, Walter and Ada. His wife died, and he af- 
terward married Martha Eliason, and to them were born two 
children — Ella and Omer. Mr. McConaha died in 1877. 
Simon McConaha remained on the]home farm till his major- 
ity, and in the winters of 1873, 1874 and 1875 taught school. 
In 1876 he went fo E-andolph County and improved a small 
farm, which he traded for another, on which he lived, till 
1881. He then spent the summer in the West, visiting 
Kansas and the Indian Territory, and in March, 1882, bought 
what is now known as the American Hotel, which he im- 
proved and now rents. He also built a stable, where he is now 
engaged in keeping a sale and livery stable. In 1878 Mr. 
McConaha was married to Alpha, daughter of James and 
Catherine Snofford. They have two children — Carl and 
Elmer. 

Thomas McConaha, deceased, was born in Fauquier 
County, Ya., Nov. 8, 1813. In 1829 his parents, Samuel and 
Nancy McConaha, came to Indiana, and settled three miles 
south of Centreville, where he spent the days of his youth. 
He then drove team for Barnett & Whiteside, millers, of Cam- 
den, Oliio, at $7 per month, and at the end of six months 
put $40 on interest, and from that time to the date of his 
death there was not a day that he had not money on interest. 



CENTRE TOWNSHIP. 353 

At the age of twenty-nine he bought the homestead of his 
father, and from time to time added to it till he owned a sec- 
tion. He was a successful farmer and stock-raiser, making a 
specialty of the cattle industry. He was married in 1841 to 
Christina Kramer, a native of Butler County, Ohio, and a 
daughter of Geo. Kramer, Sr. They had a family of seven 
children — Barbara,' Lewis, Taylor, Simon, George, Walter 
and Ada. His wife died in 1864, and he was married the 
second time in 1867, to Martha, daughter of Joshua Eliason, 
Sr. They had two children — Ella and Omer. Mr. McCon- 
aha died Sept. 15, 1877. Mrs. McConaha is living on the 
old homestead. Walter makes his home with her, and car- 
ries on the farming. In 1863, in company with G. A. Ber- 
tram and J. A. Beck, Jr,, he opened on his farm the Granite 
Tile Works, where they are doing an extensive business in 
the manufacture of drain-tile. 

JoJin McCoy was born near Richmond, Ind., June 18, 
1808, the eldest son of Thomas and Margaret McCoy, natives 
of Allegheny Co., Pa. His parents were married in their 
native county, and subsequently moved to Kentucky, remain- 
ing there, however, but one season. In the spring of 1805 
they moved to Wayne County, and cleared out a small farm 
three miles south of the present site of Richmond. He after- 
ward bought land south of the first settled and remained 
there till the land sales in Cincinnati, when he bought a tract 
of land lying on Nolan's Fork, three miles southwest of 
Centreville. A few years later he entered another tract of 
160 acres. Mr. McCoy died in 1856, his wife having preceded 
him in 1838. They had a family of nine children; all lived 
to have families of their own. Two only are now living — John 
and Morgan. John McCoj^ was married in his twentieth 
year, to Margaret Longwill, and soon after settled on wild 
land, erected a cabin, and began making himself a farm. He 
has been successful and now owns 240 acres of choice land, 
with a large brick residence and good farm buildings. Mrs. 
McCoy died in 1844. Of a family of six children, but one 
daughter is living — Mai'garet, who is now keeping house for 
her father. 

Morgan McCoy ^ one of the enterprising farmers of Centre 
Township, who has contributed largelj^ to its growth, was 



354 HISTORY OF WAYNE COUNTY. 

born in Wayne County, Ind., Feb. 24, 1818, the second son 
of Tliomas and Margaret McCoy. He was reared on his 
father's farm, receivinsj such education as was afforded by the 
schools of those days. After reaching maturity he engaged 
in farming on his own account, which he has continued with 
marked success. He pays special attention to the raising of 
stock and small grain. His farm consists of 320 acres of well 
improved land, on Nolan's Fork, of Whitewater River. In 
1852 he built his large brick residence, near a spring of pure 
water, which is drawn to the surface by a bucket, with the 
aid of a wheel and windlass. In 1844 Mr. McCoy was mar- 
ried to Elizabeth Neff, daughter of Bastian and Catherine 
Neff. She was a native of Preble County, Ohio, born ISTov. 
4, 1821, and died Nov. 4, 1869. 

John Merritt, a representative of one of the oldest families 
in the township, was born Dec. 4, 1839. His father, Ephraim 
Merritt, was born in Belmont County, Ohio, Nov. 10, 1798. 
His mother, Margaret Merritt, was born in New York, Sept. 
18, 1800. They were married Oct. 16, 1821, and in the spring 
of 1822 moved to Wayne County, Ind., and settled on the farm 
now owned by Charles Jackson, where the wife died in Aug- 
ust, 1865. In 1869 Ephraim Merritt moved to Mercer County, 
111., and subsequently to Centerville, Iowa, where he died 
July 19, 1881. There was a family often children — William 
T., Moses,. Eliza A., James Y., Mary, Sarah, Rebecca, Nancy 
M., John, Aaron J. James Y. served three years in the war 
of the Rebellion, as Captain of Company K, One Hundred and 
Second Illinois Infantry. Aaron J. was a member of Company 
I, Thirty-sixth Indiana Infantry, and died while in the service. 
John Merritt was reared on the farm and has always followed 
that vocation. He owns seventy-five acres of excellent land 
adjoining the old homestead. He was married when twenty- 
four years of age to Eliza J., daughter of Joseph and Sarah 
King. They have had five children — Sadie K., Delia A., 
Eliza A., Alice D. and Nora. Alice and Nora died in 
infancy. Mrs. Merritt is a member of the Christian church. 
William S. T. Morton was born in Hamilton County, Ohio, 
Oct. 14, 1807, and diedin Wayne County, Ind., April 30, 1875. 
His father. James Morton, was a native of Scotland, where 

\ 




' /V i 







^^^ a^^^ 






■S'^g^byH.^iC.KDevoets 



^t- 








^A,^'^ 



CENTRE TOWNSHIP. 355 

his name was known as Throckmorton, and came to the 
United States when a young man. He soon after married 
Maria Caldwell and to them were born three children — Will- 
iam S. T., James, who died when a lad, and Anna M. The 
wife died and he afterward married a daughter of John Mil- 
ler, who died July 11, 1826, leaving one son — Oliver P., late 
Governor of Indiana. When William S. T.Morton was sixteen 
years of age he learned the hatter's trade, at which he worked 
several years. He then carried on an extensive establishment 
several years, but subsequently disposed of his stock and em- 
barked in the mercantile business, and at the same time 
carried on his farm, of 300 acres, of excellent land, where his 
widow now resides. He was a thorough business man, a 
good financier, witli practical ideas which he carried out in 
his every day life. He married Charlotte Miller, who died, 
and he subsequently married, Jan. 5, 1858, Eliza M. McCul- 
longh, a native of Oxford, Ohio, and a daughter of Samuel 
McCullough. To them were born three children — William 
S. T., James T. and Clara T. 

Henry Otten, of Centre Township, Wayne Co., Ind., was 
born in Germany, Sept. 27., 1827, and when twenty years of 
age came to the United States. He landed at Baltimore, Md., 
and from there went to Cincinnati, Ohio, and thence to 
Wayne County, Ind. In 1876 he bought his farm of 132 
acres, where he now resides. He has a family of six children, 
three boys and three girls. 

Joh7i Peelle^ Jr.^ was born in Wayne Count}'^, Ind , May 
15, 1825. His father, John Peelle, Sr., was born in Wayne 
County, N. C, March 27, 1791, and died in Wayne County, 
Ind., April 20, 1879. He was married in 1815, to Penina 
Pate, also a native of Wayne County, N. C, born Aug. 26, 
1796, and three days after their marriage they bade farewell 
to home and friends, loaded their effects on a two-horse 
wagon and started for Indiana. In October they landed in 
Kandolph County, where they remained two years, and in 
1817 came to Wayne County and settled two miles north of 
what was then J^ewport. Here they settled in the woods 
and cleared up a farm, and here all their children save one 
were born. Their children were twelve in number — William 



356 HISTORY OF WAYNE COUNTY. 

T., Celia, Hiram, James, Harriet, John, Pasco, Jane, Re- 
becca, Sarah C, Calvin and Mary. All lived till maturity, 
and four are still living. In 1854 Mr. and Mrs. Peelle re- 
moved to Centrevilie, where she still resides. She liv^es alone, 
. doing her own house work, and is hale and hearty, enjoying 
a peaceful old age. 

John Prichett, M. />., is a native of New Jersey, born 
Nov. 25, 1803, A son of Joab and Mary (Buzby) Prichett. In 
1805 his parents moved to Columbiana County, Ohio, where 
liis mother died in 181:8, and his father in 1851. The latter 
was by trade a blacksmith. Of a family of eight children 
five are still living, Dr. Prichett being the eldest. Rachel 
married Simon Cope and lives in Ohio. Sarah married 
Charles Murphy and lives in Jennings Countj^ Ind. Eliza- 
beth, now Mrs. North, lives in Iowa. Joseph lives in Ohio. 
Dr. Prichett was reared in Columbiana County, Ohio. He 
began the study of medicine with Dr. Gustavus Allen, of 
Fairfield, Ohio, and commenced his practice in 1825, after 
being examined by a Board of Medical Examiners, and granted 
a license. He located in the small town of Petersburg, but 
in 1826 came to Wayne County, remaining, however, only a 
year. He returned to Ohio and remained till 1828, when he 
came again to Wayne County, and has since made it his 
home. Immediately after coming here he formed a partner- 
ship with Dr. William Pugh, who died in June, 1829. Since 
then Dr. Prichett has had several partners. He has been 
practicing medicine over fifty-six years, and is now the second 
largest practitioner in Wayne County. He now owns a drug 
store, having as a partner in the business Dr. Reed. In 1843 
he received a diploma from the Ohio Medical College, Cin- 
cinnati. He was married March 4, 1830. to Emily Talbott, 
a native of Virginia, who came to Wayne County when a 
girl. They have had three children, but one of whom, Mary, 
is living. Gustavus A. died in 1840. James M. died in 
1871. Dr. Prichett has been a Mason since 1825 and an Odd 
Fellow since 1849. He is a prominent member of the Meth- 
odist Episcopal church. 

James M. Prichett, son of Dr. John Prichett, was born 
in Centrevilie, Ind., in 1836, and died in 1871, aged thirty-five 



CENTRE TOWNSHIP. 35T 



years and two months. He received his early education in 
the Centreville Academy, and when sixteen years of age 
was appointed, through the influence of Hon. Sam W. Par- 
ker to the naval academy at Annapolis, from which he gradu- 
ated in 1857. Shortly after his graduation he made his first 
voyage in the United States man-of-war Mississippi, to China 
and Japan, remaining nearly three years. He next cruised 
in the Mediterranean, on the Richmond. Returning to 
America at the time of the breaking out of the civil war m 
1861 he was transferred to the navy yard at Washington, 
under Commodore Dahlgren, and the following^ year was 
sent down the Mississippi, under Commodore Foote; also 
participated in the siege of Fort Donelson. He had charge 
of the receiving ship Clara Dolson at Cairo until the organ- 
ization of the gun-boat fleet, when he was placed in command 
of the Tyler; from thence was transferred to the command of 
the monitor Mahopac, retaining the position till the close of 
the war. He was next assigned to duty as executive officer 
of the Vanderbilt, and soon after to the same position on the 
Augusta, and accompanied General Farragut on his expedi- 
tion to Russia. On his return to America m 1869, he was 
ordered to San Francisco, and accompanied the Pacific Squad- 
ron on the Tuscarora, to South America. Returning in Aug- 
ust! he remained at home a short time on sick leave, and was 
then ordered to the receiving ship Yermont, in the Brooklyn 
navy yard, remaining there till his last illness. Commander 
Prichett was perhaps as faithful in attention to his duties m 
the navy as any oflicer in the service. Durmg a connection 
of nineteen years and a half he had but an occasional leave 
of absence, 'and then principally on account of sickness 
His gallant conduct received complimentary mention fie- 
ou ntly during the late war from Admiral Porter and Com- 
rdore Foot' in their dispatches to the Secretary ^t the 
Navy. While on his death-bed an order came fiom he 
mvll Department directing him to report at Washington 
for promotion. In all the relations of life, both as an officer 
n the navy and as a citizen, Commander Prichett was uni- 
versally esteemed, and his memory will ever be cherished. 



358 HISTORY OF WAYNE COUNTY. 

« 

Oliver H. Reece^ accent of the Chicago, St. Louis & Pitts- 
burg Raih'oad and of the Adams Express Corapan}'^, and 
telegraph operator at Centreville, Ind., was born in Wayne 
County, Ind., March 27, 1853, a son of John and Ann 
Reece. His education was mostly obtained in New Garden 
Township. He followed farming several years after reaching 
maturity, and in 1881 was appointed station agent at Cleve- 
land, Ind,; remained there a year, and then went to Char- 
lotteville, and remained two months. In March, 1881, he 
came to Centreville to assume the duties of his present posi- 
tion, which he is admirably fitted to fulfill. He was married 
in 1878 to Amelia Dill worth, daughter of Charles and Re- 
becca Dillworth, of Ohio. Thej^ have one son — Oran. 

Hiram 3£. Robhins was burn Sept. 17, 1825, in Wayne 
County, Ind., the eldest son of Moses and Elizabeth Robbins, 
who were natives of North Carolina. He was reared on his 
father's farm, and has always followed agricultural pursuits. 
He now has an excellent farm of 179 acres, on the east branch 
of the Whitewater. He was married in 1856 to Permelia 
Grentry, a native of this county, who died in 1875, leaving 
five children. One had died in 1874. In 1881 Mr. Robbins 
was married to Rachel Laraott. They have had one child, 
who is deceased. Our subject's father was married in 1824 
to Elizab3th, daughter of Frederick Long. He then settled 
on tiie land entered by his father, where he reared a family 
of thirteen children, four of whom are still living. Besides 
being a farmer and stock-raiser, he was a teacher of vocal 
music. He died in 1879. His widow is making her home 
with her son. Dr. Robbins, of Miami County, Ind. Our sub- 
ject's grandfather, Moses Robbins, came to Wayne County 
from North Carolina in 1816 and settled on Nolan's Fork, 
afterward entering the land, nearly a section, from the Gov- 
ernment. He died in 1850. Our subject's great-grandfather, 
John Robbins, was a soldier in the Revolutionary war. 

John II. Rohe was born in the State of Oldenburg, Ger- 
many, in 1818, a son of Henry and Gendena (Myer) Rohe, of 
Kleppenburg County. He remained in his native country 
till manhood, working on a farm, and of his earnings saved 
enough to bring him to the United States, coming in 1838. 



CENTRE TOWNSHIP. 359 

He worked on the canal in Maryland, and also on a farm, at 
$8 a month. He was married in that State, in 1845, to 
Anna Wiland, and in 1849 came to Wayne County, Ind., and 
bought 160 acres of land of Joshua Eliason, in Centre Town- 
ship. He now owns 200 acres, all well improved, which he 
has acquired by industry and "perseverance. He is a highly 
esteemed citizen of Wayne County, and a liberal supporter 
of all laudable enterprises. In politics he is independent, 
supporting the man and not the party. Mr. and Mrs. Rohe 
have had six children — May, deceased, wife of Frank Blomer; 
Sarah, wife of John Bennett Baumer; Michael, married Ka- 
tie Batter ; Margaret, wife of William Pothoff; CRspero, 
married Mary Walker, and Anna is at home. Mr. Rohe and 
his family are members of the Catholic church in Rich- 
mond, Ind. 

Charles E. Both, the second son of Peter and Harriet Roth, 
was born in Wayne County, Ind., June 26, 1848. He learned 
the carpenter's trade of his father, at which he still works. 
He is a skillful workman, and has contracted and built same of 
the best houses in the township. He was married July 6, 1882, 
to Sallie T., daughter of William Reading, of Illinois. Mr. 
Roth's father was born in Bucks County, Pa., in 1821, and died 
in Wayne County in February, 1883. He came to Wayne 
County when a young man, and was married in 1846, to Har- 
riet, daugliter of John and Rebecca Hoover. She was born in 
Bucks County, Pa., June 7,1826, and came to Wayne County 
with her parents when fifteen years of age. Her father died 
in Penhook in 1877, and her mother in 1880. Mr. Roth was 
a master mechanic, a skilled workman, and many of the houses 
in Wayne Township are monuments of his industry and ability. 
He was a member of the Odd Fellows' order. Mrs. Roth is still 
a resident of Penhook. She has had six children — Henry A., 
Charles E., Mary (died in infancy), John F., Dora R. and 
Ellen H. John F. was killed in the railroad shops in 
Richmond. 

James J. Russell, son of George and Judith (Johnson) Rus- 
sell, was born in Richmond, Ind., March 23, 1823. He grew 
to manhood on the farm, receiving his education in the 
Friends' school-house at West Grove. Sept. 1, 1844, he was 



3G0 HISTOBV OF WAYNE COUNTY. 

married to Rachel, daughter of Isaac and Tamar (Menden- 
hall) Russell, of Miami County, Ohio. The}^ have had five 
children — Isaac, of Indianapolis; Elvira, deceased wife of 
Georo-e Faucet; Eiara, of Indianapolis; Ruth A., wife of 
Alpheus Williams, and Perry, agent of the S. V. R. R., 
Kingston, Ohio. Mr. and Mrs. Russell are members of the 
Society of Orthodox Friends, of which he is an Elder. Po- 
litically Mr. Russell is a Republican. His grandfather, Tim- 
othy Russell, was a native of Nantucket, where he was 
engaged on a whaling vessel in his young days. He subse- 
quently removed to North Carolina, where he entered land 
on which was built the noted Friends meeting-house, New 
Garden, that was used as a hospital in the Revolutionary and 
late civil wars. Mr. Russell's father was born in North Caro- 
lina, Aug. 19, 1782, moved to Richmond in 1813, and died 
June 2, 1841. His mother was born May 5, 1789, and died 
April 18, 1833. They had a family of seven children, three 
of whom are living — Josiali, James J.,andSina, wife of John 
Whitson. After his mother's death his father married 
Susanna Jones, who was born Oct. 2, 1799. To them were 
born three children; two are living — Mary, wife of Isaac 
Hawkins, of Morgan County, Ind. ; and Calvin W., of Kan- 
sas. Mrs. Russell's father was born Dec. 12, 1799, and died 
Oct. 8, 1871. Her mother was born Nov. 20, 1798, and died 
Nov. 25, 1871. Of their nine children se^^en are living — 
Samuel, of Troy, Ohio; Joseph, of Marion County, Ohio; 
Rachel; Oliver, of Morrow Count}', Ohio; Rosanna, wife of 
Mordecai Brooke, of Vernon County, Mo. ; Harriet, wife of 
John Pearson, of Miami County, Ohio; Tamar, wife of Perry 
Dixon, of Isabel County, Mich. 

John 8. Russell^ farmer. Centre Township, was born in 
Wayne County, Ind., April 8, 1839, the eldest son of Vin- 
nedge and Mary J. (Rich) Russell. He lived on the farm with 
his father till manhood, receiving a common-school educa- 
tion. He was married in 1861 to Mary J. Smith. To them 
were born four daughters, but one of whom is living — Clara. 
The deceased are — Nora, Elizabeth and Francena. Mrs. 
Russell lived but a few years. In 1875 Mr. Russell married 
Elniira J., daughter of Oliver T. and Mary (King; Jones. 



CENTEE TOWNSHIP. 361 

From 1871 till 1874 inclusive, Mr. Russell was enerao-ed in 
the saw-mill business, cutting lumber for a railroad company 
in Henry County, Ind, Since then he has been successfully 
engaged in farming. He has 221 acres of fine, well-cultiva- 
ted land. His wife is a member of the Christian church. 

Yinnedge Russell was born in Trumbull County, Ohio, 
Dec. 10, 1811, a son of Samuel and. Elizabeth (Vinnedge) 
Hussell. His father was of English descent, born July 5, 
1771. His mother was of German descent. Samuel Russell 
came to "Wayne County, Ind., in 1818, and in 1819 settled on 
the farm now owned by his son Yinnedge. He died at the 
age of sixtj'-three years. His wife died in 1832, aged fifty- 
two years. They had a family of four sons and six daugh- 
ters, only three of whom are living — Yinnedge; Samuel, of 
Grant County, Ind., and Ann, wife of John Kem, of Grant 
County. They were members of the Methodist church. Our 
subject's grandfather, Adam Yinnedge, was of a wealthy 
German family, and came to America when young. He 
served in the Revolutionary war, for which he received 300 
acres of land in New Jersey. He afterward sold it for conti- 
nental money which proved worthless. Yinnedge Russell 
has followed farming through life. He now owns the old 
homestead, a fine farm of 217 acres. He has filled the posi- 
tion of Justice of the Peace of Centre Township nine years. 
He is agent for the Indiana F anner, and correspondent 
for the Agricultural Bureau, "Washington, D. C. Politically 
he is a Democrat, casting his first vote for Andrew Jackson. 
He is a member of "Whitewater Lodge, No. 41, and Oriental 
Encampment, No. 28, I. O. O. F. Aug. 7, 1834, he was 
married to Jane, daughter of Joseph and Margery (Cox) 
Rich.' Seven children were born to them — John S., Joseph 
T., Thomas W. (deceased), DeWitt C, Allen W., Francena 
(deceased), Martha A. (wife of Michael Helm). Mrs. Russell 
died Aug. 15, 1851. Feb. 22, 1852, Mr. Russell married 
Elizabeth, daughter of Samuel and Bathsheba Jay, of Miami 
County, Ohio. Mr. and Mrs. Russell are members of the 
Methodist Episcopal church. 

Franois E. Scott, manufacturer and dealer in boots and 
shoes, Centreville, Ind.. was born in South Bend, Ind., Jan. 
24 



362 HISTORY OF WAYNE COUNTY. 

30, ISttl, the only son of William and Clarissa M. (Faulkner) 
Scott, his father a native of England and his mother ot 
Schenectady County, N. Y. William Scott came to the 
United States when fourteen years of age. Re was by trade 
a shoemaker, and followed that business several years in Ab- 
ington, Wayne County. He died in February, 1868. His 
wife died in 1S75. They had a family of four children — 
Mary, wife of Dr. Hall; Julia, wife of Lewis Robey; Mar- 
tha, wife of James Reed, of Richmond; and Francis E., who 
was reared and educated in Wayne County, learning the shoe- 
maker's trade of his fatiier. He commenced business on his 
own account in the fall of 1865, in Centreville. In March, 
1862, he was married to Narrie E., daughter of James and 
Mary Dunbar. They have one son — Harry S., who learned 
telegraphy in Centreville, and for three years has been oper- 
ator of the Union Dispatch office in Richmond. Mr. Scott is 
Past Grand of Hoosier Lodge, No. 23, L O. O. F. 

Rudolph S. Sho-ff^, proprietor of livery and sale stable, was 
born March 20, 1840, a son of Rudolph Shoff, who is one ot 
the leading farmers of Jackson, Wayne Co., Ind. Our sub- 
ject was reared on a farm. In 1870 he came to Centreville, 
Wayne Count}^, and opened his present livery and sale stable, 
where he has done a fair business. He was married in 1869 
to Mary Smith, daughter of Samuel and Anna Smith, of this 
county. She was born in Lancaster County, Pa. They have 
three daughters — Ada, Nellie and Christie. 

Isham Smeher, deceased, son of Jacob and Elizabeth 
(Smith) Smelser, was born Nov. 23, 1823, in Wayne County, 
Ind. He was married in 1850 to Henrietta, daughter of John 
and Catlierine Farlow, who came from North Carolijia to 
Union County, Ind., in an early day. The result of this mar- 
riage was four children — John F., Jacob S., Mary E. and 
Richard E. Sooti after his marriage Mr. Smelser settled on 
the farm now occupied by his family, and which contains 326 
acres of land. He followed agricultural pursuits through 
life, and was one of the enterprising cattle raisers of the 
neighborhood. He was a member of the Universalist church. 
His death occurred Sept. 28, 1882, in his fifty-ninth year. 
His parents came to Wayne County, Ind., in 1822, from Ken- 



CENTRE TOWNSHIP. 3G3 

tncky, and spent the rest of their lives in Boston Township. 
Jacob Smelser died Dec. 8, 1875, aged ninety-one j^ears, and 
his wife died at the age of seventy-live years, April 7, 1869. 

S. G. Smith, farmer and stock -dealer, was born near Rich- 
mond, Ind., Dec. 2, 1840, a son of George and Ellen (Still- 
well) Smith, his father a native of Maryland and his mother 
of ISTew Jersey. His father was by trade a paper-maker. In 
1839 he came with his family to Wayne County, Ind., and 
settled in Richmond where he worked at his trade a few years 
and then bought a farm in Centre Township, and the rest of 
his life was engaged in agricultural pursuits. He died at the 
age of sixty-five years. His widow, living, is seventy-three 
years old. They had a family of five children — Samuel Gr,;, 
Benjamin D. (deceased); George C, of Centreville; William 
H. and Robert P. (deceased). Samuel G. Smith was reared 
a farmer, and has always followed that vocation. He is ener- 
getic, a good manager, and enterprising, and ranks among 
the leading farmers and stock-dealers of the county. He 
owns 192 acres of fine land well-improved. Politically he is 
Republican. He was married Oct. 25, 1866, to Martha R., 
daughter of Oliver T. and Mary (King) Jones. They have 
four children — Harry J., Cora A. , Howard G. and Oscar P. 
Mrs. Smith is a member of the Christian churcii. In the 
war of the Rebellion Mr. Smith served two months in the 
One Hundred and Twenty-fourth Indiana Infantry, on the 
Ohio and Missisippi rivers. 

William H. Smith, farmer and stock-raiser, was born in 
Wayne County, Ind., Oct. 5, 1819, a son of George and Ellen 
(Still well) Smith. He was educated in the country schools, 
and when seventeen years of age was apprenticed to Solomon 
Horney & Co., of Richmond, to learn the blacksmith's trade, 
working on plows. He worked at the trade six years. He 
is now engaged in farming and stock-raising, making a spe- 
cialty of the best blooded stock and fowls. He is a thorough, 
practical business man. He owns 103 acres of fine land on 
Nolan's Fork. Politically he is a Republican, and an earnest 
advocate of temperance. Oct. 11, 1871, he was married to 
Sarah M., daughter of James W. D. and Malinda King, of 
Wayne County. They have had five children; but three are 



^364 HISTORY OF WAYNE COUNTY. 

livino- — Idella M., Florence L. and Omar J. Anna R. and 
Frankie B. died in infancy. Mr. and Mrs. Smith are members 
of the Christian church. 

Frederick V. Snider, deceased, was born near Martinsburg, 
Va., Aug. 16, 1796, and when a child his parents moved to 
Lebanon, Ohio, where he learned the cabinet-maker's trade, 
at which he worked a number of years. In 1831 he moved 
to Hamilton, Ohio, and in 1833, toCentreville, Ind., where he 
eno-aged in the dry-goods business, which he followed twenty 
years. He had one of the largest stores in the town and was 
very successful, being very popular with all his customers. He 
was one of the original Directors of the First National Bank 
of Centreville, and took a great interest in the success of the 
undertaking. Politically he was a Republican, and always 
took an active part in all points at issue of interest to his 
party. He left his room a week before his death to go to the 
polls to vote. He was a fine financier and very judicious in 
his investments. He was married in 1826 to Mary Smith, a 
native of Warren County, Ohio, born Feb, 22, 1804. Her 
parents were natives of Pennsylvania and moved to Ohio at 
an early day. She is the youngest of their eight children 
and the only one living. Mr. and Mrs. Snider had a family 
of four children — Samuel Gr., of White County, Ind.; William 
H., of Logansport, Ind.; Kate, wife of Thomas F. Gentry; 
Charlotte M., now Mrs. Coffin. Mr. Snider was an Elder of 
the Presbyterian church, his wife being a member of the 
same church. He died in May, 1883, in his eighty-seventh 
year. 

Jesse C. Stevens, eldest son of Walter G. and Martha 
Stevens, was born in St. Joseph County, Mich., Sept. 9, 
1847, and when three years of age came with his parents to 
Wayne County, Ind. He received a liberal business educa- 
tion, and is now one of the best informed men of his aofe in 
the township. He is a diligent reader and a close observer 
of all public issues. He cast his first vote for Abraham 
Lincoln. He attended the funeral of that President and also 
of President Garfield. He takes an active interest in all 
measures of interest to county, State and Nation. He is fore- 
most in all undertakings. He has represented the Republi- 



CENTRE TOWNSHIP. , 365 

can party in county, State and Congressional conventions. He 
is a member of both county and State horticultural societies, 
making vegetables and small fruits a specialty. He 
has forty-five varieties of potatoes and seventy-five va- 
rieties of strawberries, comprising the best in the United 
States. He was married Nov. 14, 1867, to Eliza A., daur\- 
ter of James W. D. and Malinda King. They have ' . v^en 
children — Martha, Malinda, Walter, Ollie J., Yiola, Flora 
and James. 

Walter G. Stevens was born in Hamilton County, Ohio, 
April 18, 1813, a son of Jesse and Anna (Tribble) Stevens, 
natives of North Carolina. His father moved to Clermont 
County, Ohio, with his parents in 1808, and in 1809 was 
married, his wife's parents having previously settled in the 
county. They subsequently moved to Hamilton County, 
and lived ^there till 1818. In 1828 they came to "Wayne 
County, Ind. Jesse Stevens was by trade a shoemaker, but 
was also engaged in the mercantile business, and owned and 
conducted a farm. He was politically a strong Republican. 
He was a member of the Methodist Episcopal church, and 
was for years a Class-leader. He was Justice of the Peace of 
Centre Township several years. He died in Centreville, Aug. 
3, 1864, aged seventy-six years. His widow survived him a 
few years, and died at the same age. Their children were — 
Sarah, wife of Aaron Birdsall, of Henry County, Ind. ; Wal- 
ter G. ; Collins C. ; Mary A., now Mrs. Peterson, of -Black- 
ford County, Ind.; Francis L.; Caroline, deceased; Jesse M., 
of Illinois; Lucinda G., wife of John C. Page; Ollie, wife 
of James McKim; Louisa, wife of Henry C. Noble; Will- 
iam H., of Indianapolis, and Chas. W., of Kansas. Walter 
G. Stevens worked at the shoemaker's trade with his father 
till eighteen years of age. He attended school but a portion 
of one term, but by diligent home study acquired a fair ed- 
ucation. When eighteen years of age he went to Michigan, 
to begin life for himself. He was the first Deputy Sherifi" of 
St. Joseph County, and was Sheriff of the county several 
years. He constructed the first jail and built the first brick 
residence in the county. He was for eighteen years continu- 
ously in public office in St. Joseph County. He was at one 



366 HISTORY OF WAYNE COUNTY. 

time tlie most extensive horticulturist west of the State ot 
New York. He is thoroughly a self-made man. He has 
made the science of horticulture a study, and is a charter 
member of the State and county horticultural societies. He 
^was for seven years Superintendent of the Wayne County 
liKfirraary. He was married in 1832 to Mary A., daughter of 
Joh?^ .and Amelia Jones, of St. Joe, Mich. She lived but a 
short ti«,ne, and he then married her sister, who died leaving a 
daughter- -Mary, wife of Francis Cunningham, of Aledo, 
111. Oct. lb, 1846, Mr. Stevens married Martha A , daughter 
of Abram Jeffries. They have had four children — Olive, 
wife of Joseph King; Jesse, Samuel D., and Howard (de- 
ceased). Mr. and Mrs. Stevens are members of the Society 
of Friends. 

Sanfiiiel Raymond, Taylor was born Nov. 28, 1831, in 
Delaware, a son of John and Nancy Taylor, and in 1833 was 
brought by his parents to Wayne Countj^, Ind. He was 
married in 1855 to Nancy J. Barnes, a native of Centre 
Township, Wayne County, a daughter of Shapley Barnes, 
who came from Yirginia to Wayne County among the early 
settlers. To them have been born five children — Lydia E., 
deceased, wife of Charley Estell, of Richmond; Anna C, 
wife of Ira Moore; John W., Frank M. and Charley S. 
Samuel R. on attaining his majority served two years at the 
carriage- maker's trade in Richmond, after which he engaged 
in fanning, which occupation he still follows. He owns an 
excellent farm of 125 acres, all well improved. He has also 
been a breeder of fine horses for many years. His father 
was a native of Delaware. He was married in 1827 to Nancy 
Hallis, who was born in 1805. They were the parents of four 
children— Elizabeth, wife of Evan Burguire; Samuel R. ; 
Sarah, wife of P. Doughty, and Anna E., wife of Davison 
Cheesman. In 1832 John Taylor moved his family to 
Wayne County, Ind., and settled near Salisbury and was em- 
ployed on the bridge and National pike. He was taken sick 
with small-pox and died in the winter of 1838. His wife 
then moved to Salisbury, and supported her family by going 
out as a weaver, and besides keeping her family she saved 
enough money to buy a house and lot in Salisbury. She is 



CENTRE TOWNSHIP. 367 

now in her eighty-first year and is making her home with 
our subject. 

Ilosea T'dlson, M. D.^ was born in Darke County, Ohio, 
Dec. 15, 1830, a son of Gresham Palmer and Kancy (Stew- 
art) Tillson, his father a native of Yermont, and his mother 
of New Jersey. His parents moved to Ohio in an earW day, 
and were married in Summerville, Butler County, but after- 
ward moved to Darke County, near Richmond, Ind. Tliey 
subsequently moved to Decatur County, Ind. When 
eighteen years of age, Hosea Tillson left home and taught 
school four years, in the meantime devoting his leisure 
hours to the study of medicine. He began his practice at 
Abington, Ind., in 1853. continuing there and in Hartsville 
till Nov. 18, 1861, when he enlisted as a private in Company 
D, Fifty-seventh Indiana Infantry. Jan. 9, 18'63, he was 
promoted to Hospital Steward; Feb. 25, 1863, was mustered 
as Assistant Surgeon of the Fifty-seventh Indiana Infantry; 
Nov. 14, 1863, promoted to Surgeon, and Aug. 15, 1864, 
appointed Chief Surgeon of the Second Brigade, Second 
Division, Fourth Army Corps, and served till mustered out. 
He returned home at the close of the war and located at 
Centreville, and a year later went to Philadelphia, Hancock 
County, and remained six years. In 1872 he returned to 
Centreville, where he has since been actively engaged in the 
practice of his profession. Dr. Tillson is a member of the 
Wayne County Medical Society, and has served as President 
of that body. He has been Examining Surgeon for U. S. 
Pensions since 1872. He is a popular man socially and 
politically, as well as professionally, forming lasting friend- 
ships with those with whom he comes in contact. He has 
served six years on the School Board, two years in the City 
Council, and is serving his third year as Secretary of the 
Board of Health. He is a Master Mason, and has held all 
the offices in his lodge, of which he is now Worshipful Mas- 
ter. He is a member of the Methodist Episcopal church, 
and has been a Trustee, and Superintendent of the Sunday- 
school several years. Dr. Tillson was married in April, 
1854, to Indiana J., daughter of Ferdinand Weber. They 
have two daughters — Cora K., wife of John M. Gentry, and 



368 HISTORY OF WAYNE COUNTY. 

Maud H., a teacher in the public schools. For twentj-ei^ht 
years Dr. Tillson has not lost a day on account of sickness. 

Judge Jesse Williams was born in Pulaski County, Ky.,. 
Auo-. 3, 1798. In 1815 his parents moved to Fayette County, 
Ind., where they passed the remainder of their days. In 
1820 Judge Williams came to Wayne County, Ind., located 
at Centreville, and opened a harness and saddler's shop. A 
few years later he formed a partnership with W. S. T. Mor- 
ton in the general mercantile business, continuing eight 
years. In the meantime he was appointed Associate Judge 
to fill a vacancy caused by the death of Asa M. Sherman, and 
at the regular term was elected to the same office. He served 
in the capacity of Associate Judge fifteen years. In the fall 
of 1837 he moved to the farm where he still resides, a mile 
and a half east of Centre ville, at that time heavily timbered. 
He was married in 1820 to Mary, daughter of Patrick Hart. 
Of their eight children, three are living — Arthur P., H. Je- 
rome, and Maria E., wife of John S. Chittenden. Mrs. Will- 
iams died June 13, 181:7, and the Judge afterward married 
Elizabeth, widow of William Poston. She died Nov. 8, 1883. 
In politics Judge Williams has adhered to the Whig and Re- 
publican parties. 

LciFayette TFi7Z/am.s, merchant, Centreville, Ind., was born 
in Fayette County, Ind., July 20, 181:8, a son of Balis and 
Martha (Heavern) Williams, both natives of Kentucky. His 
grandfather, John Williams, was a Yirginian, and emigrated 
to Kentucky, and thence to Fayette County, Ind., when Balis 
was a year old. The latter lived in Fayette County till 1854 
when he removed to Wayne County and settled on a farm 
near Centreville, where he still resides. His wife died in 
July, 186-1. Three of their six children are living — Edmund, 
Ella and La Fayette. The latter began his mercantile career 
as a clerk in the store of J. B. Van Aernam, remained with 
him three years and then went to Richmond and clerked for 
a brother of his former employer two years. In 1877 he com- 
menced business for himself in Centreville. He has had a 
good and steadily growing trade from the first; keeps a 
complete stock of dry-goods, hats, caps, boots and shoes. He 
is an experienced merchant and studies the wants of his cus- 



CENTRE TOWNSHIP. 369 

tomers. June T, 1883, Mr. Williams was married to Emma 
P. Maxwell, daughter of John M. Maxwell, of Richmond. 

Washington Wright^ farmer, was born in Wayne County, 
Ind., Jan. 31, 1826, a son of John and Mary Wright, natives 
of Pennsylvania. His father was born March 27, 1786, and 
died Feb. 5, 1879. He was married in his native State and 
soon after moved to Butler County, Ohio. In 1816 he came 
to Wayne County and entered 160 acres of land from the 
Government. It was situated in the woods, four miles south- 
west of Centreville. He improved his land and made it one 
of the finest farms in the township. He had a family of eight 
children — Margaret, wife of Morris Jones; Lucy, wife of Will- 
iam Malone; Mary Ann, wife of William Pussell; Elizabeth, 
wife of Benjamin Stinson ; Joseph, married Elizabeth Stevens; 
William, married Margaret, sister of John and Morgan Mc- 
Coy; John P., married Sarah Standley; Washington, our sub- 
ject, married, in 1849, Teresa, daughter of John IS^ugen. He 
then located on his farm, where he has successfully followed 
agriculture and stock-raising. He makes a specialty of fine 
Poland China hogs. Mr. Wright is a representative man of 
the township, and does all in his power to assist in its up- 
building. He had a family of eleven children, nine of whom 
lived till maturity. Only three are living — Gleorge W.j John 
P., and Enos S- 




CHAPTER X. 



CLAY TOWNSHIP. 



Organized in 1831. — First Election at House of Thos. 
Hatfield. — Enlarged in 1834. — Real and Personal 
Property. — Population. — Gain of Thirteen in Forty 
Years. — The Pioneers who Made it a Habitation and 
Gave it a Name. — Washington. — Its Founder. —Plat- 
ted IN 1818. — Business of ISIS and 1884. — Village 
Wealth. — Lodges, Population, Railroads and Postmas- 
ters. — Biographical. 

Clay Township was organized by the county commission- 
ers at the May session of 1831, and the first election was 
ordered held at the liouse of Thos. Hatfield, in the village ot 
Washington. It was not very large, and the commissioners 
at the March term, 1834, made the following: 

" Ordered by the board at March term, 1834, That the 
bounds of Clay Township be extended west "so as to include 
the whole of sections 21, 28 and 33, town 17, range 13." 

This gave it its present irregular boundary, which, on the 
north, is Perry and Green townships; on the east. Green and 
Centre; on the south, Centre and Harrison, and on the west, 
Harrison and Jefferson. Its greatest length is five miles, and 
width, four and one-half, and the whole area of the township 
contains 12,632.95 acres of land, this amount being the taxa- 
ble number of acres. 

Its assessed valuation real estate, Jan. 1, 1883, was $403,- 
685; its taxable personal property, $194,629; total, $598,314. 
The taxable wealth of Washington Yillage, $48,520. Total 
valuation of township, $646,834. 

In population the township, except within last decade, 
has slowly gained, but not fast enough to any serious boast 
though better than some of its sisters, who have suff'ered a 

370 



CLAY TOWNSHIP. 371 

slow decline. In 1850 Clay Township had 1,050; in 1860, 
1,069; in 1870, 1,094, and in 1880, 1,063, a gain of thirteen 
in forty years. 

THE EAKLY SETTLERS. 

Jas. Martindale, a native of North Carolina, settled on 
Green's Fork, in the township, in 1812, and settled on a farm 
about a half a mile from Washington, where his grandson, 
Jas. "W. Martindale, resides. Jonas Hatfield, Sr., came 
from Kentucky in 1812, and purchased the land on whicb. 
the town of Washington now stands. Ilis descendants still 
live in the township. Abel Jenny came the same jea,i\ and 
"joined lands with Hatfield, Sr. Jesse Albertson, from North 
Carolina, settled on a farm one-lialf mile east of Washington. 
His brother Joshua came a few years later and settled south 
of his brother on the Ratcliff 's lands. Wm. Fox came in 
1813 and left in ISM, removing to Jefferson Township, 
where he died in 1860. Joshua Benny settled on section 27, 
and James Spray finally settled on section 35. Jas. Odell 
settled in the eastern part of the township, on wiiat is known 
as Wm. Coffin's place. Miles Murphy catne in 1811:, and in 
1825 sold his farm to John Baldwin, from North Carolina. 
Mr. Baldwin's four sons — Jonathan, Isaac, David and Caleb- 
came with him. Jas. Porter settled near the Friends' meet- 
ing-house in 1817. Moses Martindale, Wni. Young, Benj. 
Angell, John Feirson and his son-in-law, Martin Martindale, 
Wm. Ball, all came in 1811 and 1815, and settled in the east- 
ern part of the township. Benj. Albertson settled on section 
36, and was from Nortli Carolina, and Owen Branson on the 
land now owned by the heirs of Thos. Adams. Jonathan 
Cloud also settled on section 36, and Wm. Pike, Isaiah 
Frazier, Jonathan Mendenhall, John Hunt and Israel Ganse 
all settled in the southeastern section of the township, and 
came prior to 1816. 

South and west of where Washington now stands quite a 
settlement was made, commencing with the arrival of Jesse 
Bond in 1813, who settled section 35. Benj. Hall, Jno. 
Foland, Stephen Horney, Moses Coffin, Absalom Williams, 
from North Carolina, whose sons occupy the homestead, came 



372 HISTORY OF WAYNE COUNTY. 

in 1S14, and died in 1868, aged ninety-three years, and Isaac 
Mendenhall, all settled in the south, southwest and west 
section of the township, being among its earliest settlers. 
Henry Hoover settled on Green's Fork, and Peter Hoover 
adjoining liim;Jno. Fincher not far oflP, and Valentine Fo- 
land in the southwest corner of the township. Ephraim 
Gentry purchased of David Hoover, on the west side. 
David Peacock came early, and his son David occupies the 
home farm. Wm. Wedims, Mason Pitcher, Enos YeJl, Sr., 
Peter "Woolfert, Jos. Davis, Jas. Owens, Sr., all came in 
1817, and settled in the western portion of the township, as 
did Jno. Brockus, who came in 1 815, as did Miles Dimet. 
Job Smith came in 1824, and Ezekiel Bradbury in 1825. 
They also settled in the western part. Jonathan Shaw settled 
on section 21, on the west line of the township, and Robt. 
Walkins and Wm. Elliott north ot him, on section 16. John 
and Josiah Bradbury on the same section, on Morgan's Creek; 
John subsequently settled on section 27. Wm. Ball came 
in 1818, as did Jas. Starling, Henry Riggs and Frederic 
Dean, and settled on section 15. Henry Garrett and Abra- 
ham Elliott came in 1814, and settled on section 23. Philip 
and Henry Penberger, in 1819, and settled on section 14, as 
did Wm. Underwood. Jonathan Poss, David Young and 
John Pitchie settled on sections 22 and 15, about the last 
mentioned date. Wm. Osborn, about 1820, settled near 
Washington, and died in 1831, aged twenty-nine. Cyrus, his 
son, resides half a mile below town. Daniel Williams, born 
in North Carolina in 1792, from Pennsylvania in 1833, 
settled in the northeast part of the township, and later resided 
one and a half miles east of Washino^ton. Thomas Cook 
settled, at an early day, where his son, Samuel Cook, lives, 
two miles north from Washington, and where he died in 
1824, aged fifty-six. He was the first saddler in Washington. 
Samuel Ball, born in Virginia, from Tennessee in 1820, and 
died in 1849, near where his son John Ball resides. John 
Wilson, from South Carolina, about 1820, settled two miles 
northwest from Washington, where he died in 1852, aged 
thirty-six. Joseph Lamb, from North Carolina, settled in 
1829, on land adjoining Perry, where he died in 1855, at the 



CLAY TOWNSHIP. 373 

age of seventy-three. Wm. Hindman, from Ohio, in 1839, 
settled two and a half miles west of Washington, and died 
in 1843, aged forty-two. Wm. Wright, from Maryland, in 
1825 settled two miles southeast from town, where he died 
in 1854, aged seventy -four. John Brooks, from North Caro- 
lina, in 1831. 

Hugh Allen, from Ohio in 1820, settled three miles south- 
east from Hagerstown, near where he died, aged sixty-six. 

David Cook, from Virginia, about 1831, settled one mile 
south of Washington, where he died in 1870, aged fifty-nine. 
Emsley Hoover, from Ohio, about 1811, settled on Green's 
Fork, southvvest from Washington, where his son Owen P. 
lives; died in 1865, aged sixty-nine. 

Abraham Elliott is supposed to have been the first Justice 
of the Peace within what is now Clay Township; the next, 
perhaps, was John Martindale. 

A block-house without a fort was built in war-time on or 
near Joshua Benny's farm, a mile north of Washington. On 
John Martindale's land, four miles west of this town, a fort 
and block-house were built by Martindale and his sons, Ehjah 
and William, Charles Morgan, Peynolds Fielder, Jacob 
Galion and Jonathan Shaw. 

Henry Garret built the first grist-mill, a mile and a hall 
above town, about the year 1815. Jonas Hatfield soon after 
commenced building a saw-mill that year at Washington, but 
not living to finish it, it was completed the next year by his 
son Thomas, who four or five years after also built a grist-mill 
at the same place. Henry Hoover (not of Richmond), about 
the year 1840, built a saw-mill two miles below Washington, 
and afterward sold it to Samuel Boyd, who, about the year 
1855, also built a grist-mill at the same place. 

About the year 1825, perhaps later, Thomas Hatfield built 
a carding machine and a fulling-mill near his other mills, and 
after running them about a year, he procured of Jesse Bond 
a site a fourth of a mile below, to which he removed them, 
and soon after sold them to the Bonds, who removed them 
further down to near where Nathan Bond resides. 

Wm. Underbill and Joshua Benny were the first black- 
^'miths in the township. 



374: I IIISTUKV OF WAYNK CuUNTY. 

WASHINGTON VILLAGE. 

The town of Washington was laid out by Thomas Hat- 
field, and the description of the original plat, certitied by 
him as proprietor, and Abraham Elliott, surveyor, Sept. 28, 
1818, was acknowledged for record Nov. 19, 1818. It is 
situated near the center of the township, on section 26, and 
is the only town within its border. It is a station on the P., 
C. & St. Louis Railroad, some ten miles northwest from 
Richmond. 

Lisbon Basey and John Russell, in partnership, were the 
first merchants, in the year 1818; next, Allen Osborn and 
Wm. Bunnell; and next, John Martindale, son of James, 
who, in 1830, sold out to Mark E. Reeves, who, with an ad- 
ditional stock, established a store which he continued until 
1840, when he removed to Hagerstown, continuing an interest 
in the store at Washington in partnership with James W. 
Scott for about five years. Jonathan and Stephen Coflin com- 
menced trade in 1843, and the business was continued by 
Stephen. The merchants in 1872 were: Dry-goods — Dr. 
Lorenzo D. Personett and John M. McCown; grocers, 
Allen Daugherty, Wm. S. Hatfield. Jan. 1, 1884, Wm. S. 
Hatfield and Allen K. Daugherty is still continuing the gro- 
cery business, and Messrs. Osborne and Bunnell are the pro- 
prietors of the dry-goods store. There is also at this date 
a drug store, owned by S. D. Sample. This includes the en- 
tire mercantile interest at the last date mentioned. 

The first physician was a Dr. Howard, who was soon followed 
by Dr. Johnson. Dr. William Bunnell, who came about 
the year 1S23, is said by some to have been the first '' regular," 
licensed physician. He died in 1853, of cholera. He was 
succeeded by his son, Rhodes W. Bunnell. Lorenzo D. 
Personett came in 1844. The latter was in practice up to 
1875. Dr. Rhodes W. Bunnell is still in practice at this 
date, January, 1884, and also Dr. E. A. Buntin, Dr. S. H. 
Moore and Dr. IN". P. Carter. 

There are three blacksmith shops, the owners being Roller 
Bros., J. H. Winkle and M. L. Trainer. There are six car- 



CLAY TOWNSHIP. 375 

penters and builders, viz. : Evans Bailey, J, S. Jones, Arthur 
Frazier, E. JVI. Douthit, D. B. Dean and W. H. Gunckel. 

FRIENDS. 

A Friends' meeting-house was built as early as 1814 or 
1815, by Jesse Bond, below the town, near the grave-yard. 
A frame house was afterward built at or near the same place. 
After the schism of 1828 those calling themselves •' Ortho- 
dox " built a house about a mile northeast of town, on land 
given for that purpose by John Baldwin. The only society 
in the vicinity holds its meetings in this house. Its present 
pastor is the Rev. J. E. West. 

M. E. CHURCH. 

The Methodist Episcopal church was organized about the 
year 1818. There was preaching at the houses of some of the 
settlers as early as 1814 and 1815. In the latter year the 
Rev. Wm. Hunt was placed on the Whitewater Circuit, and 
preached in the township at different times, at the house ot 
Jas. Porter, Wm. Fox and others, who were, a few years later, 
instrumental in organizing a society. - Among the early 
members were: James Porter, James Odell, William Fox, 
and their wives, and Polly Morgan, whose husband had been 
killed by Indians at Morgan's Creek. The miniyters who 
were appointed to the Whitewater Circuit held their meet- 
ing first, after the residences of the members, at the school- 
house, until the erection of the church. The present efficient 
pastor is the Rev. W. A. Peck. 

UNITED BRETHREN. 

While this church is not so old as the others in the town- 
ship, the churches at Jacksonbarg and at Hagerstown were 
attended by members from Clay Township. Just when the 
church society was formed is not now on record, but it was 
in the thirties'. 

They built a church near Green's Fork, which they occu- 
pied for many years. In 1870 they erected their present 
brick church in town, and the society is in a flourishing con- 
dition. Their present able pastor is the Rev. R. W. Small. 



376 HISTORY OF WAYNE COUNTY. 

SOCIETIES. 

A Lodge of Free Masons, Acacia, No. 242, was orsfanized 
under dispensation Jan, 29, 1859, and held its first meeting 
Feb. 15, 1859. Its charter is dated May 25, 1859. Its offi- 
cers were, Rhodes W. Bunnell, W. M. ; Wm. McCafferty, 
S. W. • Hugh H. Keys, J. W. ; Charles Evans, Treasurer; 
Daniel D. Rogers, Secretary; Walter Rogers, Sr., Deacon; 
Samuel Cook, Deacon. 

Bellis Encampment, No. 71, /. O. O. F., was instituted 
Aug. 31, 1865. First officers; George W. Ebersoll, C. P.; 
John Bean, H. P. ; Joseph Ludlura, S. W. ; George W. Davis, 
J. W. ; Lorenzo D. Personett, Scribe; Adam Reinheimer, 
Treasurer. 

Green'' s Fork Lodge, No. 184, /. O. 0. F., was instituted 
Feb. 25, 1857i with the following named persons as the first 
officers: James W. Scott, N. G.; Calvin Connor, Y. G.; 
Thomas M. Kerr, Secretary; Joseph F. Reynolds, Treasurer. 

POPULATION AND WEALTH. 

Washington Yillage had a population in 1850 of 219. In 
1870 it rose to 248, and in 1880, 273, and has now about 800, 
its poll being 64 in 1883. 

The value of real estate, 1882, was $23,330; the value ot 
personal property, $25,190; total assessed valuation, 
$48,520. 

The Pittsburg, Cincinnati & St. Louis Railroad passes 
through the township, near the center from east to west. 

POSTMASTERS. 

Wm. W. Bunnell, Aug. 22, 1818; Jas. W. Scott, Jan. 2, 
1841; Elias F. Halliday, April 20, 1848; Edwin F. Ogborn, 
April 22, 1851; Moses Hatfield, Dec. 19, 1851; Cyrus E. 
Gates, Jan. 30, 1854; Thos. M. Kerr, April 11, 1855; Moses 
Hatfield, March 25, 1859; Jonathan Elliott, April 15, 1861; 
Albert H. Gunckel, Kov. 20, 1862; Moses Hatfield, March 
23, 1864; Martin L. Roller, May 31, 1866, and Wm. S. Hat- 
field, April 7, 1870, and is still Postmaster Jan. 1, 1884, at the 
date of this writing. 



CLAY TOWNSHIP. 377 

BIOGRAPHICAL. 

John Allen^ second son of Hugh and Mary (Brooks) Allen, 
was born April 2, 1819, in Montgomery County, Ohio, and 
in 1821 his parents moved to "Wayne County, Ind., lo- 
cating in Jefferson Township. His father purchased eighty 
acres of uncultivated land and followed farming through life. 
He reared a family of eight children — Elizabeth (deceased), 
Jacob, John, Mason, Mary A., Marion (deceased), Thomas 
and Caroline (deceased). The father accumulated a good 
property, and died at the age of fifty-six years. His widow 
died at the age of seventy years, John received a good edu- 
cation at the subscription schools and worked on his father's 
farm till he grew to manhood, when he farmed on rented land 
one year. He then purchased seventy acres and has since 
been very successfully engaged in agricultural pursuits. He 
owns 450 acres of fine land in Clay Township, worth $70 per 
acre, and has also considerable personal property and cash. 
He is also a stockholder in the Citizens' Bank of Hagers- 
town, of which he was one of the incoporators and also a 
director while it was doing business. He was married in 
October, 18-43, to Mary, daughter of Thomas and Rebecca 
Martindale, of Wayne County. They have had five children 
— Hugh, died at the age of eighteen years; Martha, wife of 
E. S. Bunnel, of Clay Township; Franklin P.; an infant 
daughter (deceased), and Etta, who died when two years old. 
Mr. Allen and wife are members of the Baptist church. His 
grandfather, Hugh Allen, was a native of Ireland, and his 
maternal ancestors were from Yirginia. His father, Hugh 
Allen, was born in Kentucky and afterward moved with his 
parents to Montgomery County, Ohio, where he was mar- 
ried. Mrs. Allen's parents reared five children — Mary, Eliza- 
beth (deceased), Martha, Julia A. and Thomas J. (deceased). 
Mr. Martindale died when fifty-four years of age. His wife 
is still living, in her eighty-first year. 

Gyrus A. Baldwin^ eldest son of Jonathan and Mary A., 
(Albertson) Baldwin, was born June 3, 1837, in Hamilton 
County, Ind., and when sixteen months old his parents re- 
moved to Wayne County, where he lived on the home farm 
25 



378 HISTORY OF AVAYNE COUNTY. 

till he »rew to manhood. He received his early education at 
the country schools, after which he attended Earlham College 
one year. He then taught school sixteen terms during 
the winter and farmed in the summer. He taught his 
last term in the winter of 1877-78, since which he has 
been engaged in farming. He was married Sept. 22, 1859, to 
Barbara A., daughter of Jacob and Catherine (Shock) Sher- 
rick, who were of German ancestry, both now deceased. They 
have four daughters — Luella, Edna, Florence and Lodosca. 
Mr. Baldwin and family are members of the Society of Ortho- 
dox Friends and he is a minister. His wife is an Elder in 
their church, and he is Clerk of their Monthly Meeting. Mr. 
Baldwin's father was born in Guilford County, N". C, of Eng- 
lish descent, and in 1826 came with his parents to Wayne 
County, where he \was married. In 1836 he went to Hamil- 
ton County, but returned to Wayne County in 1838. His 
wife was born near Richmond, Ind. Her parents came from 
North Carolina to Wavne County about 1812 or 1813. 

A. D. Bond^ fourth son of Robert and Rachel (Thornburg) 
Bond, was born April 19, 1836, near Washington, Wayne 
Co., Ind. He obtained a good education in the schools of 
his native village, and grew to manhood on the home farm. 
At the age of twenty-live he began business for himself, and 
in 1860 bought land near Manchester, Wabash Co., Ind., 
which he improved and farmed five and a half years. He 
then traded his Wabash farm for a part of the land first en- 
tered by his grandfather, Jesse Bond, and in 1866 he returned 
to Wayne County and settled on his farm, where he has since 
been successfully engaged in farming and stock-raising. His 
farm contains 260 acres of well-improved land, and his farm 
buildings and residence are first class. He was married in 
1860 to Mary E., daughter of John and Jane (Willetts) 
Scott, of Wayne County. They have had four children — 
Emma C, born Sept. 24, 1861 ; S. Maud, born March 16, 
1861; Y. Blanche, born April 14, 1878, and died Feb. 4, 1879; 
aud Edith A., born May 20, 1882. Mr. Bond has served as 
Trustee of Clay Township since the spring of 1880, by re- 
election. Politically he is a Republican, and he is a member 
of the Hicksite Friends. His wife belongs to the Disciple 
church. 



CLAY TOWNSHIP. 3T9 

Henry Thornhurg Bond^ eldest son of Robert and Rachel 
(Thornburg) Bond, was born Feb. 10, 1827, in Clay Town- 
ship, Wayne Co., Ind. He was educated at the subscription 
schools, and lived on the home farm till thirty-three years of 
age. He has always followed farming, and now owns 227 
acres of fine farming lands, and his home farm and fine res- 
idence shows that he is one of the leading farmers of his 
township. He was married in September, 1860, to Mary A., 
daughter of Robert and Narcissa (Stinson) Boyd, who were 
natives of Kentucky and Tennessee respectively. Her father 
is deceased, but her mother still lives, in her eighty-fifth year. 
Mr. Bond and wife have three children, all living at home — 
Robert B., Emma F. and James E. Mr. Bond is a Republi- 
can in politics, and belongs to the Hicksite Friends' church. 
His wife is. a member of the Christian church. Mr. Bond's 
paternal great-grandparents were natives of England, and 
emigrated to North Carolina in an early day. His Great- 
grandfather Commons was born in Ireland, and his Great- 
grandmother Commons, whose maiden name was Hayes, was 
a native of Wales. His grandfather, Jesse Bond, was born, 
reared and married in North Carolina. He afterward lived in 
Grayson County, Ya., where our subject's father, Robert, was 
born, and in 1808 settled 160 acres of land near the present 
Earlham College, residing there till 1813, when he removed 
to a farm near the present site of Washington, residing there 
till his death. Robert Bond married Rachel, daughter of 
Henry and Nancy Thornburg, who came from Tennessee to 
Wayne County a few years after Mr. Bond's ancestors. Mr. 
and Mrs. Robert Bond reared eight children, four now living 
— Henry T., John, Abner D. and Lewis T. Emily died in 
Cass County in 1855, in her twenty-fifth year. Milton died 
in Wabash County in 1872, in his fortieth year. Lydia E. 
died in Wayne County in 1879, in her thirty-seventh year. 
Larkin T. died in Wayne County in 1882, in his thirty-sixth 
year. Their father died at the age of fifty-eight years, but 
his widow still survives, aged seventy-six years. He was one 
of the leading farmers of his day, and at his death left 1,000 
acres of fine land in Wayne, Hamilton and Wabash counties 
in the State of Indiana. 



380 HISTORY OF WAYNE COUNTY. 

Williatn Commons Bond, fourth son of Jesse and Phoebe 
(Commons) Bond, was born An^. 23, 1808, in "Wayne County, 
Ind. His parents wel*e reared and married in Nortli Caro- 
lina, and afterward lived in Grayson County, Ya. They re- 
moved to Indiana and settled where Earlham College now 
stands in 1808, residing there till 1813, when they removed 
half a mile north of where Richmond is situated. In 1815 
he entered 160 acres of land near Washington, Ind., where 
he resided till his death. He was one of the pioneers of 
Clay Township, and was the first minister of the order of 
Friends who held meetings in the township. He and his wife 
had eleven children, of whom only seven survive — Nathan, 
William C, J. Isaac, Jesse, Jr., Ruth, Hannah and Lydia. 
Mr. Bond died in his eighty-fourth year, and his wife died at 
the age of sixty-two. In 1824 our subject, in connection with 
his father and brothers, began digging a race for the purpose 
of constructing a mill, and the following year erected a saw- 
mill. They soon after erected a woolen-mill, which was the 
first mill in the country that manufactured and fulled wool 
cloth. William and his brother Nathan were associated in 
this mill a number of years. He was married Sept. 23, 1830, 
to Hannah, daughter of William and Damaris (Mills) Locke, 
who were early settlers of Wayne County. Tliey celebrated 
their golden wedding in 1880. They have a family of six 
children — Oliver S., of the Savings Bank, Toledo, Ohio ; 
Damaris, wife of E. H. Wright, of the Superior Iron Mines, 
Michigan ; Larkin, of Wayne County : Francenia, wife of 
S. G. Snider, of WhitQ Countj^, Ind.; Eliza J., at home, and 
Mattie, wife of James Horrell, of Wayne County. Mr. Bond 
and wife are members of the Society of Hicksite Friends, 
and politically he is a Republican. He owns a desirable 
farm on Green's Fork, near Washington, where he is engaged 
in farming. 

John Brooks, /Sr., was born in Stokes, now Forsyth, 
County, N. C, Nov. 18, 1806, second son of Jesse and 
Judith (Johnson) Brooks, the former of Welsh and the latter 
of English descent. They were the parents of ten children- 
Polly, David, Sarah (deceased), John, Matthew (deceased), 
Sicily, Elizabeth, Charity, Jesse W. and Alpha. Our subject 



CLA.T TOWNSHIP. ^^^ 



removed to Wayne County, Ind., in 1831, where be parcbased 
ninety acres of land for $450; and settled near Economy Perry 
Township, in 1833. He followed farming ten years, during 
which his parents moved to Wayne County, where his fatiier 
died at the age of seventy-five years, his mother following a 
few years later, at about the same age. He was ^^^rr^^^ in 
1833 to Rachel, daughter of William and Damans (Mills) 
Locke. They have two daughters-Betsy J. and Martha A 
Mrs. Brooks' died Aug. 21, 1813, after wbich Mr. Brooks sold 
his farm for $1,000, and purchased a farm north of Washing- 
ton for $16.25 per acre, where be engaged in iarnimg t.U 
1S70 He was again married in 1814, to Mary A., daughter 
of David and Anna (Henly) Johnson, of Morgan County, Ind 
They have three children-Jesse W., formerly Cashier of the 
Citizens Bank of Hagerstown, Wayne County; Emma A., 
wife of William K. Bellows, of Indianapolis ana Flora B., 
wife of Martin Worl, of Henry County, Ind. In 1870 Mi . 
Brooks sold bis farm for $102 par acre, and purchased forty 
acres east of Washington for $150 per acre He gave 
his children a liberal education. He and bis wife are 
members o^' the Friends' church. Since locating near Wash- 
ington Mr. Brooks has purchased a valuable farm of 160 acres, 
on^e mile east of his home place, for which he paid $6a per 
acre He with a number of others chartered a bank at 
Hac^erstown, known as the Citizens Bank, with a cash capital 
of $50 000 He was a Director of the bank, and for two years 
President, and has been connected with it from its organiza- 
tion in 1871 until its close in 1880. His son J. W. was also 
a stockholder. Director and Cashier, and when the bank closed 
he purchased the bank furnishing and organized a banking 

and exchange business, known - ^^^^^^^^^rf. t Ford 
Hagerstown, the firm name being J. W. Brooks & S. J. Ford^ 
The former retired from the firm in the fall of 1880. In 1879 
he, with a number of others, organized a life insurance asso- 
ciation, incorporated as the Provident Life Association ot _ 
Richmond, Ind., he being Yice-President and Treasurer. He 
was connected with it till in 1881, when he resigned Mr 
Brooks was one of the original organizers and stockholders 
of the "Richmond Industrial Association," organized May 



382 HISTORY OF WAYNE COUNTY. 

12, 1870, at Ricl)in:>nd, Ind., and was a m3mb3r of its first 
Board of Directors, and served for several yeirs. 

John Brooks, Jr., second son of Matthew and Rhoda 
(Yeal) Brooks, was born Feb. 11, 1836, in Wayne County, 
Ind. His parents were natives of North Carolina, the father 
born in 180S, of Welsh, anl the mother in 1812, of Eng- 
lish, descent. Tiiey came to Wayne Cjunty in 1831 and 
reared two sons — Asa S., living in Randolph County, Ind., 
and John. The father died in 1807, and the the mother re- 
sides with our subject. He was educated at the common 
schools, and followed farming in Wayne County till 1857, 
and in November of that year bought a farm for $2,600, 
where he farmed six years, when he sold it for $3,500. He 
then paid $7,000 for a farm on Whitewater River, where 
he followed farmino: and stock-dealing ten years, when he 
purchased a farm near Winchester (still retaining his home 
farm), paying for it $9,900, where he resided till 1880, when 
he bought the farm where he now resides in Wayne County, 
for which he paid $8,000. He still owns his two farms in 
Randolph and is one of the most successful farmers and stock- 
dealers in Randolph and Wayne counties. Dec. 12, 1855, he 
was married to Susan, daughter of William and Susan (Corne- 
lius) Beall. They have had five children born to them-William 
M., and Milton F., of Randolph County; Luther S., at home; 
Arsula R., wife of Harvey H. Hiatt, of Randolph County, and 
an infant, deceased. Mr. and Mrs. Brooks belong to the 
United Brethren cliurch. Mr. Beall, father of Mrs. Brooks, 
was born in Bourbon County, Ivy., in 1802, and came to 
Wayne County, Ind,, in 1816, where be was married in 1820 
to Susan Cornelius. She was born in North Carolina, in 
1795, and came to Wayne County at an earlj^ day. They 
rjared six children — Curran, Hannah A., Brutus, Amanda, 
Marian (deceased) and Susan. Mr. Beall died in 1850 and 
his wife died in 1876. 

Rhodes William Bunnel, M. Z?. , eldest son of Dr. William 
W. and Olinda (Ball) Bnnnel, was born Dec. 4, 1825, in 
Clay Township, Wayne Co., Ind. His father was born 
near Maysville, Ky., in 1795, and when fourteen years old 
removed with his parents to Warren County, Ohio. He was 



CLA.Y TOWNSHIP. 383 

married in August, 1822, to Olinda Ball, who was born in 
"Warren County, Ohio, in 1800, a daughter of Calvin and 
Christina (Eulas) Ball. They reared a family of live children 
— Monimia, Rhodes W., Julia A., Horace M. and Eulas S. 
Monimia and Horace are deceased. Dr. William W. Bunnel 
received a liberal education, graduating from the Ohio Medi- 
cal College, and soon after his marriage began the practice of 
his profession in Washington, Wayne Co., Ind. Mrs. Bun- 
nel aided him by teaching school in the village of Washing- 
ton. Dr. Bunnel was the leading physician of the township 
till his death. He died from cholera in 1852. His widow 
survived him till 1872. Our subject, Rhodes W., was reared 
in Washington, Wayne Cjunty, where he received his early edu- 
cation. He read medicine under his father, and graduated 
from the Ohio Medical College in 1848. He immediately be- 
gan to practice medicine in Dalton, Wayne County, in partnei'- 
ship with Dr. Dickey where he remained one year. From 1850 
till 1852 he was engaged in gold mining in California, when he 
returned to Washington, Ind., where he has since been suc- 
cessfully engaged in tlie practice of his profession. Nov. 31, 
1861, he was married to Jane L., daughter of Newton and 
Emily (Pease) Loomer. Five children have been born to 
them — Newton L., of the State University, Bloomington, 
Ind.; Monimia J., Chauncey R., Larone A., and a son who 
died in infanc}'. Dr. Bunnel is a charter member of Acacia 
Lodge, No. 242, A. F. & A. M., Washington, Ind., and has 
been Master of tlie lodge nearl}^ all of the time since its 
organization. In politics he affiliates with the Democratic 
party. 

Allen Kelly Daugherty^ dealer in groceries and general 
merchandise,. Washington, Wayne Co., Ind., was born in 
Rockingham County, Ya., Dec. 10, 1840, a son of Yalentipe 
and Mary (Kelly) Daugherty. His father was born and 
reared in the same county, and his mother a native of Lan- 
caster County, Pa. They married in Pennsylvania and 
reared their family, consisting of six sons and five daughters, 
in Rockingham County. Allen K. was reared to manhood 
in the Shenandoah Valley. His youth was spent on a farm 
and attending the subscription schools, and when seventeen 



384 HISTORY OF WAYNE COUNTY. 

years old, lie went one year to a college, near Stanton, in the 
Shenandoah Valley. He then taught school two terms in 
his native county, after which he returned to college for six 
months. In the winter of 1860-'61, he taught a term in his 
native county, when he joined the Federal army with three 
friends. They rode two nights and entered the Federal lines 
at New Creek, Ya., after which he went to Jackson burg, 
Wayne Co., Ind., where he volunteered in the Fifty-fourth In- 
diana Infantry, Company I, as first Duty Sergeant, for three 
months. In a short time he was promoted to Orderly Ser- 
geant, and served as such during his time of service. For a 
time he was on duty at Camp Morton, near Indianapolis, 
guarding prisoners of war. He, with his command, was en- 
gaged in battle with Morgan's forces, near Green River 
Bridge, and also near Elizabethtown. He was discharged at 
Indianapolis, in September, 1862, and soon after engaged in 
the cooper's trade at Washington, Wayne County, at which he 
worked two years. In the summers of 1864 and 1865 he 
taught school in Washington, after which he engaged in his 
coopering until 1870. In March, 1870, he established his 
present mercantile business, and is now one of the leading 
merchants of the place. He was married Nov. 29, 1863, to 
Martha A. Coffin, a native of Indiana, and daughter of Jona- 
than and Martha (Parker) Coffin, who came from North Car- 
olina in an early day. Mr. Coffin represented his county in 
the Legislature of North Carolina a number of years. Mr. 
and Mrs. Daugherty have two children — Francis L. and 
Charles H. Mr. Daugherty is a member of Greensport 
Lodge, No. 184, I. O. 0. F., and of Ellsworth Post, No. 200, 
G. A. R., both of Washington. He has served as Justice of 
the Peace of Clay Township, since 1878, by re-election. 

'Hon. Branson Lewis Harris was born in Green Township, 
Wayne Co., Ind., April 21, 1817, a son of James and Naomi 
(Lewis) Harris. He lived on the home farm till he was 
twenty-two years old, after which he farmed for himself on 
rented lands till 1843. He then bought a farm in Green 
Township, where he followed agricultural pursuits till Feb- 
ruary, 1854, when 'he purchased his present farm of 275 
acres. His farm is in a high state of cultivation and his 



CLAY TOWNSHIP. 385 

farm buildings are good. Sept. 9, 1839, be]was married to 
Martha Young, who was born March 23, 1817, only daughter 
of Jesse and Ruth (Martindale) Young, the former deceased. 
They have two sons — Addison C, born Oct. 2, 1840, a prom- 
inent lawyer of Indianapolis, and Alonzo M., born Sept. 13, 
1845, living on the old homestead. Addison was a member of 
the State Senate, from Indianapolis, during the session of 
1877, and at the same time Mr. Harris was in the House of 
Representatives. Mr. Harris was Justice of the Peace of 
Green Township three years, and while holding that position 
was elected by the Whig party to re[)resent the county in the 
State Legislature of 1853. From 1856 till 1859 he was Trus- 
tee of Clay Township, and superintended the construction 
of the first public school buildings in Clay Township. He 
was Township Trustee two years during the civil war. In 
1875 he was elected to the State Legislature by the Repub- 
lican party of Wayne County, and was re-elected in 1877. 
Mr. and Mrs. Harris are members of the Christian church, 
of which he is Elder and Deacon. His parents were natives 
of Guilford County, N. C, and settled in Wayne County in 
an early day, where they were married. They had a family of 
seven children — Branson L. ; Winston E., of Wayne County; 
Addison R., deceased; Milton R., minister of the United 
Brethren church, of Delaware County; Allen M. , of Wayne 
County; Hannah, deceased; Sarilda, wife of W. H. Harris, 
of Wayne County. Our subject's father followed farming 
through life. He was a member of the Friends' church 
until the war of 1812, in which he was a soldier. He joined 
the Methodist Episcopal church a few years before his death. 
He was Justice of the Peace of Green Township two terms, 
and died July 20, 1854, in his sixty-second year. His wife 
died in her seventy-fourth year, May 14, 1870. 

Daniel Webster Harris^ farmer and stock-dealer, was born 
in Randolph County, Ind., Dec. 18, 1849, the second son of 
Milton R. and Matilda (Bradbury) Harris. His grandfather, 
James Harris, came from North Carolina and settled in 
Wayne County, Ind., where Milton R. was born and reared. 
Milton R. Harris afterward settled in Randolph County, 
where he had four children born to him — Corwin, Daniel W., 



386 HISTORY OF WAYNE COUNTY. 

Sarilda J. and Laura I. Corvvin died at the age ot five and 
Sarilda J. at the age of two years. He soon after removed 
to Wayne County, where six more children were born to him 
— Clara E., Mary N., James W. and Willie (twins; the lat- 
ter died in infancy); Moses E. and Leota A. The mother 
died Dec. 6, 1872, and Mr. Harris married Mary (Wright) 
McCowan, of Dalaware County, Ind., three children being 
the result of their nnion— Charles, Hayes and Cora. Milton 
R. Harris is a minister of the United Brethren church. 
When five years of age Daniel W, moved with his parents 
to Wayne County, where he was reared on the farm and at- 
tended tlie common schools. After he grew to manhood his 
father removed to Delaware County and still engaged in ag- 
ricultural pursuits and the ministry. Daniel W. remained 
on the farm in Wayne County, where he has since been en- 
gaged in agricultural pursuits. He was married April 24, 
1872, to Lucetta J., daughter of William and Mary (Smith) 
Hall, of Yigo County, Ind. They have four children — 
Walter M., Mary M., William C. and Frank A. Mr. Harris 
and wife are members of the United Brethren church. Mr. 
Hall was reared and first married in England to Eliza Brig- 
ham, by whom he had seven children — Mary, Robert W., 
Aneliza, Emma, Thomas, Elizabeth and Megginson; Eliza- 
beth and Thomas deceased, the latter at Libby Prison while 
retained as a Union prisoner. William Hall was again mar- 
ried at Terre Haute, Ind., Oct. 6, 1847, to Mary E., daugh- 
ter of Joseph and Jane Smith, who was reared in Ross 
County, Ohio. This union was blessed with eleven children 
— Joseph, Walter, Lucetta J., Ella E., Charles E., Jenetta J., 
Matilda A. and three others who died unnamed. Mrs. Mary 
E. Hall died S3pt. 10, 1876. William Hall died Sept. 28, 
1880. 

George Gillespie Ilindman, farmer and stock-dealer. Clay 
Township, was born in Butler County, Ohio, Jan. 26, 1823, 
eldest son of William and M-artha (Gillespie) Hind man, natives 
of Westmoreland County, Pa., and Warren County, Ohio, re- 
spectively. They were the parents of six children, four of 
whom are still living — Gillespie, Simuel, William and George 
G. When our subject was six years old his parents moved 



CLAY TOWNSHIP. 38Y 

to Montgomery County, Ohio, residing there five years. They 
lived in Shelby County, Ohio, six years, when they moved to 
Wayne County, and settled in Clay Township, in 1839, where 
they died a few years later. After he attained his majority 
George G. worked as a farm-hand, and by industry and econ- 
omy was soon able to purchase land, and became one of the 
leading farmers and stock-dealers in the township. Reverses 
in trade, however, crippled him, and he was obliged to begin 
life over again. He now owns a fine farm of over 200 acres. 
He was the principal man in building the turnpike from Wash- 
ington to Hagerstown, and was Pj-esident of the company a 
number of years. He is a Republican in p'^litics, and was 
elected to the office of County Commissioner by a large ma- 
jority in the fall of 1882, and is still holding that position. 
He was married Feb. 20, 1845, to Mary E., daughter of Jesse 
and Margaret (Warren)Thornburg, who came from Tennessee 
to Wayne County in an early day. They have had ten chil- 
dren—Archibald K., of Wayne County; Francis M., of Ma- 
rion County, Ind.; Martha, wife of J. Horney, died at the 
age of twenty years; Clara M., wife of Joseph Cary, of Cam- 
bridge City, Ind.; Laura J., wife of J. Rickey, of Cambridge 
City, Ind.; Sarah J., wife of Jacob Taylor, of Wayne County; 
William S., of Hagerstown; George W., died at the age of 
eighteen months; George T. and Alice, at home. Mr. 
and Mrs. Hindtnan are members of the Christian church, of 
which he is Trustee. 

Andrew Homey was born Dec. 20, 1835, in Wayne County, 
Ind., and is the third son of Stephen and Nancy (Williams) 
Horney, who were natives of Guilford County, N. C. His 
father came to Wayne County about 1815, where he was 
married to Nancy Williams, who came to Richmond in 180T 
with her parents. They reared a family of nine children — 
Rebecca, John (deceased), Absalom (deceased), Sarah, An- 
drew, Esther, Mary A., Jesse, and Martha (deceased). Ste- 
phen was a farmer by occupation, and died in Wayne County, 
aged eighty years. His wife is still living, aged eighty-one 
years. Andrew obtained a common-school education. He 
was reared a farmer, and has always followed that avocation, 
and at present owns a well-cultivated farm of 120 acres, with 



388 HISTORY OF WAYNE COUNTY. 

a first-class residence. He was married Sept. 5, 1858, to Sa- 
rah J., dangliter of R )bert ani Lydia (Brovvn)Franklin, who 
were early settlers of "Wayne County, where they reared six 
children — Clarissa (deceased), Elizabeth, Henry, Sarah, Samuel, 
and Eobert (deceased). Mrs. Franklin died at the age of fifty 
years. Mr. Franklin is yet living, and is eighty-three years 
of age. Mr. and Mrs. Horney have eight children — Henry 
C, Emily J. (wife of Charles Linderman, of Wayne County), 
Matilda, Martha, Olive (wife of Robert B^eson, of Wayne 
County), Lydia, Sadie and Walter S. Mr. Horney and wife 
are members of the United Brethren church, and he has 
served his church as Trustee. 

Andrew Thomas Kepler^ youngest son of JPeter and Eliza- 
beth (Shafer) Kepler, was born May 12, 1821, in Wayne 
County. When he attained his majority he purchased 196 
acres where he now resides. In 1866 he purchased the 
Green's Fork grist and saw mills, which he operated in con- 
nection with his farming pursuits until 1868. He then sold 
the mill, but the parties failing to keep their contract, he 
took charge of it in 1870, and in 1873 again sold it. In 1876 
he again became sole owner, and has since operated the mills. 
The first grist-mill on the present site was erected in 1859-'60, 
by Samuel Boyd. It was destroyed by fire, and re-built by 
Mr. Kepler in 1878, at a cost of $7,500. He has all the mod- 
ern machinery for manufacturing the new process flour, and is 
now doing a large custom business, also owning a tine farm 
and first-class residence. He was married Jan. 28, 1818, to 
Mary, daughter of John and Mary (Savage) Fertich, natives 
of Pennsylvania, of German ancestry. They moved to Wayne 
County, Ind., in 1832, where the father died, aged seventy- 
one years. Mrs. Fertich is living, in her eighty- fourth year. 
Mr. and Mrs. Kepler have two children — Amanda E., wife of 
Levi C. Waltz, of Wayne County, and Charl6s B., of Wayne. 
Mr. Kepler is a member of the German Lutheran church, and 
his wife belongs to the Disciples church. Mr. Kepler's an- 
cestors were originally from Germany. His parents were 
born in Maryland, and settled in Wayne County, Ind., in 
1820, and his father rented a mill, which he operated one year. 
The next year he purchased the farm now owned by Alonzo 



CLAY TOWNSHIP. 389 

Kepler, where he resided frum 1821 until his death, at the 
age of sixty-six years. His wife died in 1834, aged fifty 
years. They had five children — John, Peter, Andrew T., 
Margaret (deceased), and Catherine. 

Rev. Rees D. Laufmaii, son of John and Mary Laufman, 
was born in Perry County, Ohio, July 25, 1810; received a 
fair common-siehool education. Sept. 15, 1861, he enlisted in 
Company G, Thirty-second Ohio Infantry, participating in 
Green Briar, Allegheny Mountain and Harper's Ferry, where 
the command was surrendered as prisoners of war by Gen- 
eral Miles, paroled and sent to Chicago via Baltimore, Md. 
They were exchanged in the spring of 1863 and placed in the 
Seventeenth Army Corps. They were in the following battles 
in the investing of Yicksburg, viz. : Port Gibson, Thompson 
Hills, Jackson, Champion Hills, and the long siege of Yicks- 
burg. He was wounded in the memorable charge at Yicks- 
burg, and before fully recovering from the effect of the 
wound was prostrated with the congestive fever and sent to 
Lawson Hospital, St. Louis, Mo. After the fever had been 
subdued sufficient for his removal, he served as medical 
nurse until the close of the hospital, being in the hospital 
the three winter months, when he rejoined his regiment at 
Yicksburg, and with them participated in the second battle of 
Champion Hills, Big Shanty, Kennesaw Mountain siege and 
capture of Atlanta and the battle of Jonesboro, Ga. ; was 
discharged soon after by reason of expiration of term of ser- 
vice. He came to Wayne County, Ind., in the spring of 
1865, and was married Feb. 28, 1866, to Jane D. , daughter of 
Jonathan and Mary Ann Baldwin. They have had four 
children — Wm. L., born Jan. 5, 1867; Mary A., born Dec. 
8,1870; Albert W., born April 9, 1876, and Laura B., born 
Oct. 13, 1878. Mr. Laufman owns and farms 150 acres of 
well cultivated land one mile northeast of Washington. He 
has taught six terms of school, and has been a minister of 
the Methodist Episcopal church since 1867. 

James WiUlam Martindale^ only son of John and Lydia 
(Hatfield) Martindale, natives of Ohio, was born in Washing- 
ton, Wayne Co., Ind., Dec. 5, 1829. His maternal grand- 
father, Thomas Hatfield, was born in Kentucky, and settled 



390 HISTORY OF WAYNE COUNTY. 

in Washin<rton in 1812, and first laid out the village. His 
paternal grandfather, James Martindale, came from North 
Carolina to Ohio in an early day and in 1809 came to Clay 
Township, Wayne Co., Ind., and was the first settler on 
Green's Fork, near Washington. He had four children, two 
daughters, Martha and Rebecca, by his first wife, and two 
sons, John and William, by his last wife, Elizabeth Adington. 
He died at about the age of seventy years. John Martin- 
dale, father of our subject, was born in Ohio in 1810, and 
died when forty-one years of age. His wife still survives, 
in her seventy- fifth year. They had three children — James 
W., Sarah and Adeline. James W., whose name heads this 
sketch, was reared on the farm, and now owns a portion of 
the farm entered by his grandfather. Oct. 20, 1848, he was 
married to Lydia King, a native of Dublin, Wayne County, 
and a daughter of Isaac and Anna King. Mr. King built 
the first house at Dublin. He subsequently removed to Rush 
County, Ind., where he died, after which his wife removed to 
Wayne County and died in Richmond in August, 1881. Mr. 
and Mrs. Martindale have three children, all living in Wayne 
County — John, Emma (wife of Alpheus Baldwin) and Eden 
S. Mrs, Martindale and three children are members of the 
Friends' church. Mr. Martindale has served as Trustee of 
Clay Township six years, and in June, 1875, he was ap- 
pointed County Commissioner, and was elected by tlie Repub- 
lican party the following year, holding that ofiice seven years 
by re-election. 

Ahner Nicholson, second son of Andrew and Sarah (Lamb) 
Nicholson, was born in -Wayne County, Ind., Sept. 8, 1838. 
He was educated at the common schools, and was reared on a 
farm. He has followed farming pursuits through life, and at 
present owns an excellent farm of eighty acres, and a com- 
fortable residence. He was married in 1858 to Adaline M., 
daughter of Nathan and Minerva (Lewis) Wilson, early set- 
tlers of Wayne County. They have had three children — 
Charles E., Elmer E., and a daughter who died in infancy. 
Mrs, Nicholson is a member of the Disciple church. Mr. 
Nicholson's parents were natives of North Carolina, and 
came with their parents to Wayne County with the early set- 



CLAY TOWNSHIP. 391 

tiers. They were married in this county and reared a family 
of seven children — Luther, was a soldier in the late war in the 
Thirty-sixth Indiana Infantry, and died from a disease con- 
tracted in the army; Charles W. ; John, was also a soldier in 
the Thirty-sixth Indiana Infantry ; Evaline ; Cornelia, de- 
ceased ; Julia and Abner. The mother died when sixty-two 
years of age. The father is living, at the age of sevety-nine 
years. 

Albert Orlando Pierce, youngest son of Francis and Re- 
becca (Page) Pierce, was born in Wayne County, Ind., June 
2, 1839. He worked on the farm till eighteen years of age, 
when he began working at the cooper's trade during the win- 
ters and farming during the summers. Aug. 18, 1861, he 
enlisted in Company D, Eighth Regiment Indiana Infantry, 
as a private for three years. He was engaged with his regi- 
ment in the campaigns through Arkansas and Missouri, and 
was discharged at Middlebrook, Mo., March 25, 1863. He 
then engaged in farming in Madison County, Ind., till 1880, 
when he purchased his present farm of 200 acres, where he 
now resides. He was married Dec. 10, 1863, to Elizabeth, 
daughter of Stephen and Elizabeth (Williams) Pike, whose 
parents settled in the county in an early day. This union was 
blessed with five sons — John H., Edmund W., Robert P. 
(deceased), Stephen F,, and Mark (deceased). Mrs. Pierce 
died March 25, 1883. She was a member of the Christian 
church. Mr. Pierce belongs to the First Christian Church, 
and in palitics is a Republican. His father was of Eng- 
lish parents, and was born and reared in New York, and 
came to Richmond, Ind., when a young man. He was mar- 
ried in 1831 to Rebecca Page, a native of New Jersey, of 
Welsh descent, who came to Richmond in 1825. After their 
marriage they resided in Pickaway Countj', Ohio, nearly 
eight years, when they settled in Milton, Wayne Co., Ind. 
They had twelve children — John, died in infancy; John and 
David (twins), both deceased ; Francis N., Edmund G., Al- 
bert 0., Margaret, Amanda (deceased), Minerva, Almira, 
Emma (deceased), and a daughter who died in infancy. Mr. 
Pierce spent most of his life in mechanical pursuits, but his 
later years were spent in farming. He died in 1881, aged 



392 HISTORY OF WAYNE COUNTY. 

seventy-five years. His wife is yet living, aged sevety-seven 

years. 

Charles L. Stutson, farmer, second son of Dr. Jennett and 
Bethia (Wan) Stutson, was born in Zanesviile, Muskingum 
Co. Ohio, Feb. 2, 1837. His parents afterward removed to 
Madison County, Ohio, locating in West Jefferson. His 
father was a prominent physician and large land-owner; was 
also proprietor of a grist-mill, and an extensive pork- 
packer. Charles received a good business education at the 
hio-li schools of his native town. His youth was spent in 
workino- on the farm in summer and in assisting his father in 
packing pork or in the mill. After he grew to manhood he 
eno-ao-ed in stock dealing, and was for two years associated 
with Washington Marks, a prominent stock dealer of Madi- 
son County. He was then associated a number of years with 
Alexander Wilson, when the latter retired from active busi- 
ness and Mr, Stutson carried on the business alone until 
18Y8, when he settled on his farm, two miles northeast of 
Washington, Wayne County. He was married Jan. 11, 
1877, to Sarah J., daughter of Jesse and Rebecca (Cog- 
shall) Cates, early settlers of Wayne County. Mr. Stutson 
enlisted during the late war in the One Hundred and Thir- 
teenth Ohio National Guards, and served three months, 
prijicipally at New Creek, W. Ya. He is a member of 
Webb Lodge, No. 42, A. F. & A. M., and Woodard Lodge, 
No. 212, L O. O. F., and also belongs to Chapter No. 4, R. 
A. M., all of Richmond, Ind. 

Alfred Underhill, deceased, was born in Jefferson County, 
East Tenn., May 2, 1811, and in 1816 moved with his 
parents, John and Jane (Jones) Underhill, to Wayne County, 
Ind. They settled near Economy, and reared twelve chil- 
dren, of whom only three survive — Armina, Jessie and Jane. 
Those deceased are — Hannah, Lemuel, Alfred, Belinda, Emily, 
Elvira, Julia A., Clarkson and John. Their father was a 
cripple, and taught school during his life. Alfred was reared 
on a farm, and received a good business education from his 
father. After he grew to manhood he taught school five 
years. He was married Sept. 27, 1836, to Hannah, daughter 
of Joel and Elizabeth (Maxwell) Hayworth. They were the 



CLAY TOWNSHIP. 393 

parents of five children — Lizzie, wife of Captain Joseph F. 
Floyd, of Florida; Anna M.; Mary and Sarah (twins), the 
former married to Dr. J. R. Brown, of Wayne County, and 
the latter to Captain J3. F. Brown, of Union Connty, Ind.; 
Olive, died at the age of twenty-one years. After his 
marriage Mr. Underhill again taught school four winter 
terms and farmed during the summer, after which he 
followed larming exclusively till his death, July 7, 1876. 
He was a member of the Society of Orthodox Friends. 
Mrs. Underhill belongs to the Society of Friends, and 
is an Elder of the society. Her parents came fromi 
Tennessee to Union County, Ind., in 1818, where they 
reared a family of thirteen children-, of whom six are living 
— Mary, Hannah, Laban, Richard, David and Eli. John, 
Jonathan, Anna, Elizabeth, Jonathan, Joel and Sarah are 
deceased. Mr. Hayworth was born April 17, 1786, and his 
death occurred Dec. 4, ]86J:. His wife died July 30, 1866. 
She was born Jan. 9, 1791. 

Henry Williams^ youngest son of Absalom and Mary 
(Cook) Williams, was born in Wayne County, Ind., July 23, 
1837, on the farm where he now resides. His parents were 
born in Guilford County, N. C, Jan. 12, 1775, and Feb. 5, 
1800, respectively, and his father came to Wayne County, 
Ind., in 1807, and lived where the eastern part of Richmond 
is located until 1815, when he settled in Clay Township, and 
entered 320 acres of land. His first wife was a daughter of 
William Harvey. They had nine cliildren — Mary, born 
Sept. 20, 1797; Richard, born Jan, 7, 1800, and died at the 
age of thirteen years; Nancy, born in 1802; Rebecca, Jan. 
11, 1805; William, Oct. 20, 1807; Elizabeth, May 30, 1811; 
John, May 31, 1814; Isaac, Dec. 27, 1817, and Absalom, 
Sept. 6, 1820. His second wife was Hannah, widow of 
Joshua Williams, who died shortly after her marriage. He 
was again married to Mary Cook, by whom he had two 
children — Sarah J., born Jan. 7, 1840, and Henry, our sub- 
ject. Mr. Williams died Feb. 5, 1868, and his last wife died 
Aug. 20, 1879. Henry was reared on a farm, receiving only 
a common-school education. He is a well-read man, and has 
a well-filled library. He has made farming his principal oc- 
26 



394 HISTORY OF WAYNE COUNTY. 

cnpation tlirongli life. He was married Auir- 28, 1873, to 
Mrs. Nancy J. Cook, widow of Temple Cook, and daughter 
of William and Mary (Brown) Fry. Mrs. Williams had two 
children by her former husband — Minnie C. and Henry A. 
Cook. Mrs. Williams was born Oct. 3, 1838. Mr. Williams 
is a niember of the United Brethern church. Mrs. Williams 
belongs to the Society of Orthodox Friends. 

Oscar Leiols Wilson, farmer and minister, was born Aus^. 
11, 1853, in Wayne County, Ind. He was reared on a farm, 
and received his early education at the country schools, after 
which he attended the college at Spiceland, Ind., about one 
year. He followed farming until 1877, when he entered the 
ministry of the United Brethren church, and in 1878 and '79 
traveled in the Osage Conference in Kansas, since which he has 
been traveling in the Whitewater Conference. He is a mem- 
ber of the Sugar Grove class of the United Brethren church. 
He was married in July, 1874, to Sarah, daughter of Ithamer 
and Margaret (Fox) Lamb, early settlers of Wayne County. 
They have three children — Alonzo, Eva and Correl. Mrs. 
Wilson is a member of the United Brethren church. Her 
parents were reared in Wayne County, arid had one son and 
six daughters born to them, of whom the following survive — 
Sarah, Yirena, Louisa, Martha, Esther and Joseph. Our 
subject's grandfather, Samuel Wilson, and his wife were 
reared iu North Carolina, of English ancestry, and were 
among the first settlers of Clay Township, Wayne Co., Ind. 
They had a family of seven children. Their son N^ithan 
was married in Wayne County to Minerva Lewis, by whom 
he had four children, of whom only two survive — Oscar L., 
our subject, and Adaline, married to Abner Nicholson. The 
father followed agricultural pursuits through life and died.in 
Wayne County aged forty-five years. His wife survived him 
twenty-six years and died at the age of sixty-eight years. 
They were members of the United Brethren church. 



CHAPTER XI. 



FRA.NKLIN TOWNSHIP. 



Organization.- -Settlement. — Early Events. — First Mills. 
— Churches. — Town of Whitewater. — Its Origin and His- 
tory. — First Merchants, Etc. — Bethel. — A Prosperous 
Village. — Biographical. 

This township is in the northeastern corner of Wayne 
County, tlie State of Ohio adjoinin;^ it on the east, and Ran- 
dolph County on the north. It is seven miles in length, 
north and south, by four east and west, and contains much 
excellent farming land. The principal stream is the Middle 
Fork of the Whitewater, in the eastern part of the township. 
Franklin was formed from a portion of New Garden in May, 
1834. The first election was held at the town of Hillsboro, 
now Whitewater. 

Isaac Commons is supposed to have been the first settler. 
He came from North Carolina and settled near the southern 
line of the township about 1809. Robert Morrisson soon after 
settled on the next farm north, which he sold Henry Palen. 
Joseph Ashton bought the farm from Palen. John Nichol- 
son, Barnabas Boswell and Isaac Hiatt settled early in the 
same neighborhood. Excepting Nicholson and Ashton, all of 
the above were North Carolina Friends. 

Among the early settlers of the southeastern part of the 
township, who came a little later than those above mentioned, 
were John White, on section 2 ; James Wickersham ; Ben- 
jamin Elliott, from North Carolina, on land later owned by 
his son; John Zimmerman, from Pennsylvania, on the State 
line ; Charles Teas, from Delaware, on the Townsend farm ; 
Dr. John Thomas, on the south line of the township, and 
Edward Barton, on land afterward occupied by his descend- 
ants. 

395 



396 HISTOKY OF WAYNE COUNTY. 

The early settlers of the southwestern part of the town- 
ship were: Micajah Jones, from North Carolina, on section 33; 
John Simmons, Thomas Fisher, from the same State, and 
Daniel Fisher, on the same section ; Joseph Brown, from 
Pennsylvania; John Venard ; Edward B. Hunt, from North 
Carolina; Elijah Mundin; Mesheck Llewellyn, on a farm after- 
ward owned by Wm. Star buck; Paul Swain, from North Car- 
olina; Benjamin Harris and William Starbuck, from North 
Carolina; Jonathan Grave, from Delaware; and John P. 
Thomas, on the south line, where his sons now own. 

During the war of 1812 the settlers generally left their im- 
provements to escape danger from the Indians. Aftt.r the 
war the progress of settlement. was more rapid. Job Elliott, 
from North Carolina, settled a mile south of Whitewater in 
1815; Stephen Elliott was an early settler on land adjoining 
the town; Wm. Hunt, from North Carolina, on land adjoin- 
ing the town on the east, on land afterward owned by John 
Unthank; Henry Newton, an Englishman, on the State line; 
Jonathan Commons, on the State line ; Thomas Mason, from 
North Carolina, in 1816, near Whitewater; Samuel Williams, 
from North Carolina, near town in 1818. Gabriel Harrell, 
from North Carolina, settled a half mile southwest of town; 
Nathan Jones, from North Carolina, entered the land later 
owned by Peter Blose and C. C. Hunt; Thomas Mason, Ji*., 
three-fourths of a mile north of Whitewater; Kichard Bunch, 
on the Stephen Bunnell farm; Elihu Hunt, from North Car- 
olina, a mile northwest of Whitewater; Heni'y Garrett and 
Benj. Parker, from North Carolina. 

In the western part of the township: Wm. Fulghum, 
from North Carolina; Lemuel Chance, from the same State, 
on section 16; Charles Thomas, on the Jonathan Marine 
farm, and Edward Fisher, near the west line, both from 
North Carolina; Andrew Starbuck, on section 22, from North 
Carolina; Isaac Pyle, on section 27; Joshua Brown, from 
Pennsylvania;George Blose, from Ohio, and Wm. Hunt were 
all early settlers. 

In the northwest part of the township Jesse Overman, Wm. 
Nixon, Samuel Henderson and Thomas Simons were early 
settlers. 



FRANKLIN TOWNSHIP. 397 

Tlie Harlan settlement, now Bethel, was beo^uii in 1817 by 
James Harlan and his sons, from Kentucky. Nathan Elliott 
removed to this settlement in 1817. John Thompson and 
John, Joseph, Nathan, D ivid and Wm. H. Anderson settled 
in tlie same neighborhood about 1817. 

Win. Addleman, from Pennsylvania, settled one and one- 
half miles northwest of Whitewater in 1819. He cut a huge 
tree on his farm soon after arriving and built a camp against 
the trunk, and there lived with his wife and six children several 
months until he erected a cabin. Tne tree measured seven feet 
and seven inches across the stump, and was over seventy seven 
feet from the butt to the lower limbs. John M. Addleman set- 
tled in 1826 a mile and a half north of Wiiite water. He 
served as a Justice of the Peace. Joseph P. Addleman, Na- 
than White, James White, Robert Starbuck, and Cornelius 
Yanuys, a blacksmith, were earl)' settlers. 

The road known as the " Quaker trace," from Richmond 
to Fort Wayne, was opened by Paul Swain, Wm. Simmons, 
Thomas Roberts, Daniel Fisher, Nathan and Henry Hunt, 
of this township; Abraham Ashley, Euos Grave, of Wayne 
Township, and many otiiers. Grave surveyed the road. 

Wm. Starbuck, about 1817, built the first saw-mill, near the 
southwest corner of the township. Another early saw-mill 
was built by Henry Newton and John Unthank, about 1825. 
James White built another at an early date. 

Valentine Harlan, in 1829, built a grist-mill above James 
White's saw-mill. Wm. Addleman, Jr., and Stephen Elliott 
built another a short distance north of Whitewater, in 1837. 

Dr. John Thomas was the first physician. He lived in the 
southern part of the township, and had a large practice. He 
carried his medicines in a bladder, instead of a saddle-bag. 
Early physicians at Whitewater were: Drs. John H. Bruce, 
Azel Owens, R. G. Brandon, Robt Hamilton, Wm. Williams, 
Wm. Commons, Robt. Fisher, Harlan HirrisDu and others. 

CHURCHES. 

The earliest religious society in the township Wi*s that ot 
the Friends, who built a log meeting-house two miles south 
of Whitewater, near the site of the present brick house on the 



398 HISTORY OF WAYNE COUNTY. 

turnpike. Isaac Commons, Job Elliott, Wm. Hunt, Joseph 
Ashton, John J^icholson, Jeremiah Cox, Jr., and Luther 
Tillson were early members. 

The Christian church at Bethel was formed in Augus^, 
1821, under the ministration of John M. Foster. Meetings 
were first held in the dwelling of Valentine Harlan, after- 
ward in a school-house; next in a large log meeting-house 
half a mile east of Bethel, where the graveyard is, until the 
present house in Bethel was built. Since the pastorate of 
Mr. Foster this church has enjoyed the ministerial services of 
Valentine Harlan, 2d., Eli Harlan, Hosea C. Tillson, Josepii 
G. Harlan, Hardin Harrison, Henry Polly and others. 

The Episcopal Methodists organized a church near Jesse 
Hunt's, in the southwest part of the township, about the year 
1830. Edward Starbuck, Hugh Stevenson, Joseph Hender- 
son, and Joseph Whitacre were early members. Tlie organi- 
zation was given up about 1865. 

The Methodist Episcopal church was formed at Whitewater 
about 1831 to 1832. Among its early members were: William 
Boswell, Thomas K. Peeples, Wm. Brown and their families, 
and Margaret Addleman. It was in the Centreville and Will- 
iamsburg circuits. The congregation at first met in a log 
house, near where the present house was built in 1854-. 

The Wesleyan Methodists organized a church about 1854. 
and built their present house of worship near the site of the 
old house of the Episcopal Methodists. Early members were: 

Edward Starbuck and Edward, his son, Jacob and M 

Brown, Elijah Roberts, Elias Chenoweth, Ambrose Roberts, 
with the families of most of them. Edward Starbuck, Jr., 
was a local preacher. Among their preachers have been John 
W. Johnson and Daniel Worth. 

A Christian church at Whitewater was formed in 1867. 
Early members were: James M. Gist, Jesse T. Hunt, Wm. R. 
Winsor, Henry W. Thomas, Wm. L. Robinson and their 
wives; Sally White, Aleda Harney, Milesia Addleman. Their 
permanent place of worship is the lower story of the Academy 
building. Their preachers have been: Mr. Buff, who had 
preached before the organization, Wm. D. Moore, Joseph G. 
Harlan, Edward Fenton and others. 



FRANKLIN TOWNSHIP. 399 

WHITEWATER. 

Whitewater, an incorporated town of about 200 inhabit- 
ants, is situated near the Middle Fork of the Whitewater, on 
the Richmond and Whitewater turnpike. Tlie town was laid 
out by Stephen Elliott and John White, and plat recorded 
Nov. 12, 1828. An addition was made by Stephen Elliott in 
1832. The town was first called Hillsboro, and it was known 
by that name until recently, when the name was changed to 
Whitewater. 

The first merchant in Whitewater was John D. Price. He 
sold out to Stephen Elliott, who kept on the southwest cor- 
ner. Elliott sold out to John H. Bruce and Jonathan D. 
Gray. Thomas Morton, from Miami, Ohio, was an early 
merchant on the northeast corner. Wm. B. Sheneck started 
a store about 1S39 and continued several years. T. J. Ferguson 
began in 1844. 

Whitewater postofiice was established in 1832; Jonathan D. 
Gray, the first Postmaster. 

The town now has three stores — one, a general store, kept 
by Nathan Gi'ave; two groceries, by Wm. Robinson and Hi- 
ram Surplice. The practicing physicians are: Drs. Wm. 
Williams, James Courtney and W. T. Griffiths. Black- 
smiths: Thomas White, Hiram Gist, A. Jackson. Chair- 
maker, Charles Wolverton. The town has two churches, 
Methodist and Disciples, and lodges of Odd Fellows and 
Masons. 

BETHEL. 

The village of Bethel, situated in the northern part of 
Franklin Township, has about 125 inhabitants. It was laid 
out in 1850 by Elihu Harlan and Joseph Anderson. Bethel 
is a small bwt prosperous village, wealthy and surrounded by 
a good farming country. Its people are distinguished for 
thrift and morality. 

Wm. McFarland opened the first store in Bethel in 1845, 
on the northeast corner. Edward Osborne, of Newport, soon 
afterward started a store which was kept by Joseph Unthank. 
Later merchants were: John A. Unthank, Walker Yeatman, 
Jesse Richards, Jacob and Howard Harlan, Morgan & 
Henderson, and others. 



400 HISTORY OF WAYNE COUNTY. 

Bethel p -stoffice was established ill 1850; Wm. E. Hind- 
man, the iiist Postmaster. 

The village contains two stores — one general store, kept by 
Harlan & Wiley, and one grocery, kept by Lafayette "White. 
There is also a Disciples' church and a Masonic lodge. 

BIOGRAPHICAL. 

Joseph P. Addleman was born Sept. 6, 1819, in Chester 
County, Pa., a son of John M. and S.irah (Whitaker) Addle- 
man, the formsr born April 14, 1790, and the latter in 1796. 
His parents were married Nov. 24, 1813, and when he 
was seven 3'ears old moved to Wayne County, where 
h'j was reared on a frontier farm and educated at the 
subscription schools. He was married July 10, 1845, 
to Catherine, daughter of Jesse and Ellen Townsend, 
early pioneers of Wayne County. They liave had six 
children, of wliom only two survive — Thomas J. and 
Charles A. Tiie deceased are — Milton D., Samantha Jane, 
Jesse W. and Id i. After his mvrriage he lived on a farm 
four years, after which he carried on the mercantile business 
in Whitewater for seven years. In 186L he removed to the 
farm where his grandfather settled in 1828, where he followed 
agriculturcil pursuits with success, and now has a line farm of 
178 ac:es of well-cultivated land. His great-grandfather, 
John Michel Addleman, was born Sept. 15, 1723, a son of 
Martin Addleman, and came from Germany to America, May 
24, 1752, because of the law forb'dding his marriage with the 
lady of his choice, whom he married on board the ship. Hav- 
ing no money, his services were sold to pay for their passage 
here. He worked at the shoemaker's trade in Philadelphia 
till the debt was paid, after which he followed farming in 
Chester Count}'^, Pa., the rest of his life. His second son, 
Joseph, married Sarah Pierce by whom he had ten children. 
In 1826 his children — John M , Cileb and Orpha (now wife 
of Isaac Pyle), came to Wayne County, Ind., and Joseph, 
with the rest of the family, came in 1828 Joseph settled on 
what is known as the Addleman farm in Franklin Town- 
ship, which is now owned by our subject. Here he passed 
tlie remainder of his days. His son John M. settled one 



FKANKLIN TOWNSHIP. 401 

and a half miles northwest of Whitewater where he lived 
ti'i 1856 when he removed to the village of Whitewater, 
where he died, aged eighty-three years. His wife died about 
ten days later aged seventy years. They were active mem- 
bers of the Episcopal church. They were the parents of 
thiiteen children, eight of whom survive, seven living in this 
county and one in Randolph County, Ind. John M. in con- 
nection witii his farming pursuits worked at nnsonry, car- 
pentering and coopering. He was Justice of the Peace eight 
years. William, the youngest son of Joseph Addleman, 
was elected to the Legislature from Wayne County, Ind. 

Barnabas Barton was born in Franklin Township, Wayne 
Co., Ind., March 2, 1831, the eldest child of William and 
Lurana (Boswell) Barton. He received a common-school 
education and remained with his father on the farm till his 
marriage, Aug. 17, 1854, to Mary, daughter of Jacob and 
Maha!a Adlleman. To them were born two daughters — 
Anna E., wife of Hamilton Chenoweth, and Florence A., 
wife of Isaac Chenoweth. After his marriage Mr. Barton 
resided on a farm in Wayne Township for one year. During 
the late war he enlisted in the Fifty-seventh Ohio Infantry, 
but on reaching Indianapjlis he was honorably discharged 
on account of disability. He then resided in Whitewater 
ten years, and in 1873 he went to Kansas, bat at the end of 
two years he returned to this county. In 1881 he erected a 
fine residence on his farm which he had purchased during the 
war, to wliich he removed and has since carried on farming 
and stock-raising. His wife died Feb. 4, 1882. Siie was a mem- 
ber of the Methodist Episcopal church. Mr. Barton belongs to 
the same church. His father was a native of Maryland, of 
English descent, and a son of Edward and Ann Barton, who 
settled on section 1, Franklin Township, among the early 
settlers. Our subject's mother was a daughter of Barnabas 
and Jane Boswell, natives of Xorth Carolina, who came to 
Wayne County in an early day. To William Biirton and wife 
were born seven children, four of whom survive. William 
Barton was a successful farmer, and was the ownsr of a large 
property. He died April 7, 1877. His wife died in 1844. 



402 HISTORY OF WAYNE COUNTY. 

William E. Barton was born Dec. 9, 1815, in Caroline 
Contitv, N. C, the eldest son of Andrew and Eliza (Kelly) 
Barton, who were natives of Maryland, of English ori- 
irin. Ilis mother died when he was five years of age, and 
in 1823 he came to Wayne County with his father, who lived 
in Franklin Township until his death. On reaching his? ma- 
jority he worked out for a year, and Jati. 10, 1838, he was 
married to Phoebe Webster, a native of Berks County, Pa., 
who came with her parents to Indiana when eight years of 
age. Six children have been born to them, three of whom 
survive. After his marriage Mr. Barton bonght the farm 
where he still resides, and which contains 174 acres of ex- 
cellent land. He has been actively engaged in the cause of 
Christianity for tifty-three years, and for thirty years was a 
local preacher in the Methodist Episcopal church. 

Mahlon H. Bond was born in Wayne Township, Wayne 
Co., Ind., Nov. 2, 1818, the third son of Joseph and Sarah 
(Mendenhall) Bond, who were natives of Guilford County, N. 
C. Joseph Bond was a son of Edward Bond, who came to 
Wayne County about 1809 on a prospecting tour, and the 
following year Joseph moved with his wife and purchasid a 
farm of eighty-six acres of uncultivated land in Wayne 
Township which he cleared and soon liad a fine farm. He 
built a saw-mill a few years later which he operated in con- 
nection with his farming till his death in 1864. He had nine 
children, of whom only four survive. Mahlon H. spent his 
youth in helping his father clear the frontier farm and 
running the saw-mill. He was educated at the subscription 
schools. On reaching his majority he engaged in carpenter- 
ing and building for several years. *He was married in 1839 
to Susan, daughter of Ellis and Rnchel Mullen. They were 
the parents of live children, three of whom survive. In 1819 
his wife died, and in 1851 he was again married to Martha 
P. Bennett, a native of Pennsylvania, who came with her 
father to Wayne County, Ind., in 1837. To this union were 
born four children, two of whom survive. After his mar- 
riage with Miss Mullen Mr. Bond resided on his father's 
farm about three years, after which he was engaged in farm- 
ing and carpentering in Huntington County, Ind., for four 



FRANKLIN TOWNSHIP. 403 

jears. He then returned to this county and is now engaa^ed 
in fanning and manufacturing lumber. He has also invented 
a derrick for raising large buildings. Mr. Bond enlisted Aug. 
16, 1862, in Company I, Eighty-fourth Indiana Infantry. He 
participated in the battle of Franklin and served till the close 
of the war, when he returned home. He settled on his pres- 
ent home in 1871. He is a member of the Society of Friends. 

James R. Bowen was born in Randolph County, Ind., July 
22, 1843, a son of James C. and Elizabeth (Jeffery) Bowen. 
His father was a native of Ohio and moved to Handolph 
County, Ind., in an early day. His mother was a native of 
New Jersey and removed with her parents to Randolph 
County, Ind., when two years of age. He remained with his 
parents till manhood, receiving his education in the common 
schools. W"hen twenty-three years of age he began working 
at the carpenter's trade, continuing it three years. He was 
married Sept. 8, 1867, to Emily B., daughter of Jonathan and 
Piety (Bogue) Marine. After his maninge he settled on a 
farm in Randolph County, but a year later moved to Wayne 
County and settled in Franklin Township where he now re- 
sides. He and his wife are members of the Society of Friends. 
They have had two children; but one is living — Myrtle. 

Ellas Chenoweth^ farmer and stock-raiser, was born in War- 
ren County, Ohio, Feb. 24, 1823, the eldest son of Jacob and 
Charlotte (Cabe) Chenoweth. His father was a native of Vir- 
ginia and of English origin, a son of William and Catherine 
Chenoweth. He came to Warren County, Ohio, about 1813, 
and engaged in farming. His wife came to Warren County 
two years later. She was a daughter of Elias and Sarah Cabe, 
and is of Irish and English origin. They were the parents of 
five children, four of whom survive. Jacob Chenoweth died 
in 1828, and in 1835 his widow married Jacob Jennings. 
They came to Wayne County, Ind., in 1843 and resided in 
New Garden Township for thirty years. At present they are 
making their home with our subject. Elias Chenoweth was 
reared on a farm and educated at the common schools. On 
coming to Wayne County he settled in Franklin Township, 
near his present home. He was married Jan. 2, 1845, to 
Mary M., daughter of Isaac and Orpha (Addleman) Pyle, 



404 HISTORY OF WAYNE COUNl'Y. 

early settlers of Wayne County. Tiieir children are — 
Amanda M., A-in Eliza, William S., Jacob H., Isaac P., 
Elias L. and Mary S. Mr. Clienoweth has been very suc- 
cessful in his fanning pursuits and at present owns XQQ acres 
of well-cultivated land. Politically he is a Repnblican, and 
lie and wife belong to the Wesley an Methodist church. 

Henry N. Dtiffec^ farmer and stock-raiser, was born in 
Franklin Township, Wayne Co., Ind., Feb. 19, 1846, young- 
est son of John and Elizabeth (Garrettson) DufFee. He re- 
ceived his education in tiie common school and resided with 
his parents till their death. Hj still resides on the old home- 
stead, which contains 112 acres of well-cultivated land. April 
12, 1883, he wis married to Mary J., daughter of William 
and Susannah (Towns3nd) Newbirn, of Wayne County. 
They are members of tho Christian church. O.ir subject's 
father was a native of Chester County, Pa., and of Irish 
origin. He is a son of Alexmder Duffee. He was married 
in Preble County, Ohio, to Elizabeth, daughter of Gideon 
and Margaret Garrettson. She was a native of Maryland, of 
Scotch and Irish descent. They reared five sons to maturity, 
of whom four still survive. After his marriage John Duffee 
settled on the farm where our subject resides. He followed 
shoemakiiig till his death, which occurred Sept. 12, 1882, 
aged nearly seventy-seven years. His wife survived him till 
March 25, 1883, when she died at the age of seventy-six years. ' 

Edward Fisher^ deceased, was one of the earliest settlers of 
Wayne County, Ind., coming here with his father in 1810. 
They first settled on what is now the Judge Perry farm. 
He was born in Guilford County, N. C, Dec. 3, 1805, a son 
of Daniel and Demaris (Starbuck) Fisher, and a grands'jn of 
Daniel Fisher, who died in North Carolina in 1795, and Will- 
iam Starbuck. He was but five years of age when his pa- 
rents came to the Territory of Indiana, and like all boys 
reared in the new country, his advantages for an education 
were limited. He remained on the farm with his father till 
manhood, and then entered land a mile north of the home- 
stead, which is still in the family, being a part of the farms 
owned by his sons Ellis N. and Theodore F. In his father's 
family were thirteen children, all of whom lived to man and 



FRANKLIN TOWNSHIP. 405 

womanhood. In June, 1837, Mr. Fisher married Phoebe 
Bunker, daughter of Abraham Bunker, a descendant of the 
Nantucket Bunkers, who were of French origin. Alter his 
marriage he settled on the farm in Franklin Township, where 
his wife died in 1875, aged sixty-nine years. Mr. Fisher died 
in March, 1882, aged seventy-five years. They were ii;ioni- 
bers of the Society of Friends. To them were born six chil- 
dren — Ellis JST. , Daniel B., Esta J. (deceased), Alexander H, , 
Anna and Theodore F. 

Ellis iV. Fisher^ the eldest son of Edward and Fhoebe 
(Bunker) Fisher, was born in Franklin Township, Wayne 
Co., Ind., Jan. 7, 1839. When fifteen years of age he began 
learning the mason's trade, and served an apprenticeship of 
three years. March 31, 1859, he was married to Abigail 
Hunt, daughter of Jesse and Catherine Hunt, early settlers 
of Wayne County. In 1861 he moved to Huntington County, 
Ind., and Dec. 8, 1863, enlisted in Company A, Thirteenth 
Indiana Cavalry, serving till the close of the war. He re- 
turned to Huntington County, but in 1865 moved to Illinois, 
where he lived six years. In 1871 he returned to Wayne 
County and bought a part of the old homestead, wiiere he has 
since resided, although he works at his trade in connection 
with attending to his farm. He has eighty-seven acres of 
well-improved land with a good residence and farm build- 
ings. He and his wife are members of the Society of Friends. 
They have seven children — Corwin C, Albert N,, Phoebe C, 
Bertha, Emma J., Burhard H. and Frederick. 

W. B. Graham, M. D., was born June 26, 1843, in Preble 
County, Ohio, the eldest son of A. S. and Mary E. (Penland) 
Graham. His father was a son of William Graham, and of 
Irish and Scotch descent, and his wife was a daughter of Peter 
and Rachel (Henry) Penland, who were among the first set- 
tlers of Preble County, Our subject's parents resided in 
Preble County, Ohio, till 1853, and spent the rernainder of 
their days in Decatur County, Ind. W. B. came with his 
father to Decatur County, and being the eldest son and his 
father being in poor health the greater part of the farm work 
devolved upon him. In August, 1864, he enlisted in the 
late war, serving till its close. He was on active duty nearly 



406 HISTORY OF WAYNE COUNTY. 

all the time and was honorably discharged in June, 1865. He 
then returned to Decatur County, where he remained a few 
months, and then removed to Preble County, Ohio, and en- 
gaged in farmitig. He was first married March 22, 1870, to 
Emm I Price, of Preble Cninty, who died fo.tr months after 
her marriage. After his wife's death he began improving 
his education, and spent three terms at the academy at White- 
water. He began to study medicine in 1870, and attended 
the Eclectic Medical College of Cincinnati, Ohio, in the win- 
ter of 1873-'74:, and received his certificate in June of the 
latter year, after which he practiced over six months at Au- 
burn, Djcatur Co., Ind. He then followed farming in the 
same county for one year, when he located near Middlebury, 
Wayne Co., and in connection with his farming pursuits he 
built up a good practice. At the end of a year he removed 
to the village of Middlebury, residing there till 1882, when 
he purchased the farm where he has since resided. His farm 
contains eighty acres of well-cultivated land and in connection 
with his profession he is engaged in farming and stock-rais- 
ing. His second marriage took place Sept. 22, 1874, with 
Elmira Cox, a daughter of Robert Cox. She died July 29, 
1881, and he was again married Aug. 23, 1883, to Susan 
M., only daugliter of Thomas and Susan Wesler. Dr. Graham 
is a member of the Lutheran church. 

J. C. Graves was born in Wayne County, Ind., Jan. 26, 
1824, the youngest of ten children of Jacob and Anna Stroud, 
who were born, reared and married in Delaware, and in 1816 
they removed to Indiana. They settled in Wayne Township, 
where Jacob followed farming and worked at the tailor's 
trade the remainder of his life. He died, in April, 1862, and 
his wife died in June, 1849. They were active members of 
the Society of Friends. Our subject was reared on a frontier 
farm and received his education at the subscription schools. 
Nov. 11, 1845, he was married to Elizabeth, daughtei of 
David and Mary (Wilkes) Moore, who were pioneers of 
Wayne County. They have had five children — Nathan, Alva, 
David E., Alfaretta, and Ann Eliza, who died at the age of 
eleven n onths. After his marriage Mr. Graves purchased a 
farm in Franklin Township, residing on it twenty-eight years. 



FKANKLIN TOWNSHIP. 407 

Since 1874 he has made his home in tlie village of White- 
water. He and his wife belong to the Christian church. 

Nathan Graves^ eldest son of J. C and Mary (Moore) 
Graves, was born Nov. 4, 1848, in Wayne Township, Wayne 
Co., Ind. He was educated at the common schools and lived 
on the home farm until he grew to manhood. He was mar- 
ried Aug. 27, 1870, to Sarah M. , daughter of Henry Blose. 
They have had six children born to them — Barbara E. (de- 
ceased), Early F., Dessie C, Effie F. and Zonia M. After his 
marriage Mr. Graves followed farminir in Franklin Township 
for eight years, and in 1879 he removed to the village of 
Whitewater, where he has since carried on a thriving mer- 
cantile business. Mr. Graves is a member of the Christian 
chnrch, and politicalh' is a Republican. 

Z^aywZ'Zr.(;/sZ?/, farmer an I stock-raiser, wai b^rn Aug. 3, 
1850, on the farm where he now resides, in Franklin Town- 
ship, Wayne Cl>., Ind., anl is the eldest sun of Josiah 
and Rachel (Overman) Haisly. In early life he attended the 
common schools, and completed his education at Earlham 
College, Richmond, Ind. Dec. 19, 1873, he was married to 
Be'ile Britton, a daughter of Daniel and Louisa Brittou, of 
Randolph County, Ind. To this union have been born five 
children — Edwin E., Frank, Gertrude, Vernon and Nellie. 
After our subject's marriage his father removed to Arba, 
Randolph Co., Ind., where he died. Mi". Haisly still resides 
on the old homestead, which contains ninety-seven acres of 
well-cultivated land. He has erected a tine residence which 
is surpassed by none in this part of the county. He is a 
member of the Friends' Society, and politically he is a Re- 
publican. 

E llh It Harlan, ^eQ,Q2iQQ(\, was prominently identified with 
the early history of Wayne County. He contributed largely 
toward its development, both of money and time. He was a 
liberal man and was foremost in the furtherance of all lauda- 
ble enterprises. He was b^rn in South Carolina in 1789, a 
son of James and Edith (Howard) Harlan. His parents re- 
moved to Barron County, Ky., when he was a child, and he 
was reared and married in that county. In 1817, with his 
brothers and their families, he came to Wayne County, and 



408 HISTURY OF WAYNE COUNTY. 

enterod 'l60 acres of Government land on section 12, 
Franklin Township, on the present site of Bethel. Besides 
cleariiii'- and improving liis farm he manufactured various 
kinds of farming utensils that could be made of wood. He 
was a natural mechanic, and any tiling required by the farmers 
could be made by him. He was energetic and a good man- 
ager, and accumulated a good property. He was married in 
Barron County, Ky., in 1810, to Annie Girt, daughter of 
Joseph hud Hannah (Breed) Girt, and granddaughter of Ben- 
jamin Girt. They had a family of eleven children. Ten 
grew to maturity, and four sons and four daughters are living. 
Mr. and Mrs. Harlan were members <>f the Christian church. 
Politically he was first a Whig and after the organization of 
the Republican party was an active worker in its ranks-. He 
died May 8, 1872, aged eighty-two years. His wife died 
the same year, aged eighty years. They lived a peaceful 
married life of over sixty-one years. 

James T. Harlan is a descendant of one of the earliest 
settlers of Wayne County. His -father, Joshua Harlan, was 
born in Barron County, Ky., July 6, 1791. His mother, 
Margartt Thompson, was born in East Tennessee, Oct. 28, 
1793. They were married May 13, 1813, and in the spring of 
1817 came to Wayne County and entered the land on section 
12, Franklin Township, where their son John now lives. The 
mother died Dec. 10, 18.7, and the father Sept. 9, 1878. They 
had a family of four children — Mary (deceased), James T., 
John T. and Jane. They were for many years active mem- 
bers of the Christian church. James T. was reared a farmer, 
and has always followed that vocation. He now owns 146 
acres of good land, well improved, with good residence and 
farm buildings. He was married June 7, 1838, to Margaret, 
daughter of David and Nancy (Doughlit) Wolf. Her father 
was a native of New Jersey, but moved to Wayne County in 
1829. Mr. and Mrs. Harlan have two children — David and 
Anna J., both living near their parents. They are members 
of the Christian church. 

Joseph G. Harlan, the oldest son and fourth child of Elihu 
and Annie (Girt) Harlan, was born in Franklin Township, 
Wayne Co., Ind., Oct. 14, 1818. His early education was 



FKANKLIN TOWNSHIP. 409 

limited to the subscription schools. He remained with his 
parents till twenty years of age, when his father gave him his 
time and he went to learn the carpenter's trade, serving an 
apprenticeship of one year. He worked at his trade eleven 
years, and then moved to a farm one mile north of Bethel, 
where he lived till 1872, when he moved to Bethel, and has 
since been living a quiet, retired life. Nov. 7, 1839, he was 
married to Mary Ann Porch, daughter of Michael and Esther 
(Cassidy) Porch. Mr. Porch came to Wayne County from 
New Jersey in 1826. Mr. and Mrs. Harlan have four chil- 
dren — Martha, Levi, Wickliffe and Milton. They are mem- 
bers of the Christian church. Politically he is a Republican. 

Nathan Harlan^ third son of Elihu and Annie (Girt) Har- 
lan, was born Sept. 16, 1831, in Franklin Township, Wayne 
County. He was educated in the common schools, and lived 
on the home farm till he grew to manhood. He was married 
Jan. 18, 1849, to Sarah, daughter of Isaiah and Hannah 
(Stuart) Tilson, Of their five children four still survive — 
Leonidas, Phoebe Ann, Josephine and Elmer N. Oliver is 
deceased. Mr. Harlan followed agricultural pursuits about 
five years, after which he carried on the mercantile business 
at Bethel successfully for twenty-five years. In 1882 he re- 
tired from his mercantile pursuits, and now resides on the old 
homestead. In 1870 he was elected Township Trustee, which 
position he held for eight years. In 1878 he was elected by 
a large majority to represent his county in the Legislature, 
which office he ably filled. Mr. Harlan and wife are mem- 
bers of the Christian church. 

Stephen Harlan^ dealer in wagons, carriages, etc., was born 
in Franklin Township, Wayne Co., Ind., Aug. 13, 1834, fourth 
son of Elihu and Annie (Girt) Harlan. He was reared on a 
farm and educated at the common schools. In 1857 he en- 
gaged in the mercantile business in Bethel, which he fol- 
lowed till 1861. Sept. 10, 1861, he enlisted in the Thirty-first 
Indiana Infantry as a musician, serving in that capacity until 
March 5, 1862. He was then engaged as sutler for two years, 
and in 1864, soon after the surrender of Yicksburg, he re- 
turned home. He then engaged at carpentering several 
years, when his eyesight becoming impaired, he was unable 
37 



410 HISTORY OF WAYNE COUNTY. 

to work at the trade, and has since been engaged in his pres- 
ent business, in which he has been highly successful. Sept. 
11, 1855, he was married to Delana Chance, a native of Wayne 
County, who died in 1856. Mr. Harlan is a member of the 
Christian church, and politically he is a Republican. 

Thomas Healy was born in County GruUiver, Ireland, in 
1807, a son of Thomas and Catherine (Kempsey) Healy. His 
mother died when he was a child. He remained with his 
lather till the latter's death. In 1843 he came to the United 
States, landing in New York in June. He immediately went 
to Philadelphia and was employed on a farm in Chester 
County, Pa., where he remained twelve years. He then 
moved to Hamilton County, Ohio, and rented land six years; 
then bought some land in Preble County, Ohio, and remained 
there nine j'ears. In 1869 he bought the farm in Franklin 
Township, Wayne Co., Ind., where he now resides. He 
owns 120 acres of fine land, well cultivated. He is an indus- 
trious, energetic man, and has accumulated a good property. 
He was married in Chester County, Pa., in 1850, to Celia 
Pentecost, a native of County Gulliver, Ireland, who came to 
America in 1845. They have one daughter — Delia, now the 
wife of Michael Norton, and resides on the homestead with 
her parents. They have had two children — Thomas (de- 
ceased) and John. 

Nathan Hill^ third son of Aaron and Piety (Arnold) Hill, 
was born in Randolph County, Ind., Feb. 11, 1840. He re- 
ceived a common-school education, remaining with his par- 
ents on the farm until he grew to manhood. On attaining 
his majority he engaged in farming on his own account, 
which occupation he still follows, together with stock-raising. 
He was married Dec. 20, 1867, to Abbie, daughter of Corne- 
lius and Lydia (Mills) Longfellow. They are the parents of 
tour children — Clara May, Alice, Anna and Leona. After 
his marriage Mr. Hill settled on a farm in his native county, 
where he resided eight years. In 1875 he removed to Wayne 
County and settled in Franklin Township on his present 
farm, which contains eighty-four acres of well-cultivated land. 
Mr. Hill and family are members of the Societv of Friends. 



FRANKLIN TOWNSHIP. 4J1 

Noah S. Ilunt^ eldest son of William and Elizabeth (Ped- 
rick) Hunt, was born in Franklin Township, Wayne Co., 
Ind., March 6, 1830. He was reared on the home farm till 
he grew to manhood, and received his education in the com- 
mon schools. Jan! 3, 1849, he was married to Esther, 
daughter of Henry and Elizabeth Hunt, of Hancock County, 
Ind. They are the parents of four children — Amanda, Will- 
iam H., Alonzo and Yolley D. Mr. Hunt has a farm con- 
taining forty acres of well-cultivated land, on which he has 
resided since his marriage. He is a member of the Wesleyan 
Methodist church, and politically he is a Kepublican. 

Abraham D . Jefferis^ farmer and stock-raiser, was born in 
Franklin Township, Wayne Co., Ind., March 8, 1829, the 
youngest son of Joshua and Sarah W. (Balentine) Jefferis. 
His youth was spent in assisting his father on the farm and 
attending the common school. When railroads were few he 
was engaged during the winter in driving a team for his 
father from Cincinnati to Wayne County. Jan. 3, 1850, he 
was married to Mary, daughter of William and Mary (Moon) 
Williams, early settlers of this county. They have five chil- 
dren — Josephine, wife of James B. Joy, a farmer of Franklin 
Township; Mansfield, a farmer and school teacher of Frank- 
lin Township; Alice; Sarah, wife of William A. Morrow, a 
farmer of Wayne Township, and Elenora, wife of William A. 
Clements, a merchant of Fountain City. After his marriage 
Mr. Jefferis settled on the old homestead, where he has since 
been successfully Engaged in agricultural pursuits. He and 
his wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal church. 

William. C. Jefferis was born April 27, 1822, in Wayne 
County, Ind., the eldest son of Joshua and Sarah (Balentine) 
Jefferis, the former a native of Chester County, Pa., born 
Dec. 25, 1795, of English descent, and the latter a native of 
County Derry, Ireland, of Scotch descent. They were mar- 
ried in 1819 in Chester County, Pa., and in 1821 they came 
to Wayne County, Ind., and purchased 300 acres of partially 
improved land in Franklin Township (then New Garden) and 
156 acres in New Garden Township. Joshua followed agri- 
cultural pursuits in Franklin Township till his death in Feb- 
ruary, 1876. To him and wife were born three children — 



412' HISTORY OF WAYNE COCTNTY. 

Martha W., William C. and Abraham D- Mrs. Jefforis died 
in Mirch, 1851. She belonged to the Presbyterian chnrch, 
and \.r. Jeiferis belonged to the Society of Friends. William 
C. was reared on the farm and educated in the subscription 
schools. He was married April 20, 1843, to Esther Starbuck, 
a native of Wayne County, and a daughter of William Star- 
buck, one of the first settlers of the county: Mrs. Jefferis died 
in June, 18i7, leaving two children — Martha E., and Albert, 
who enlisted in the late war, and after serving over three 
years was killed at the battle of Franklin, Tenn., in Novem- 
ber, 1864:. In January, 1852, Mr. Jeiferis was again married 
to Elizabeth, daughter of John S. Hunt, by whom he has had 
two children — Yiola and Esther. Since his marriage Mr. 
Jeiferis has followed agricultural pursuits in Franklin Town- 
ship with the exception of the time spent in the army. He 
enlisted in Julj', 1862, in Company B, Fifth Indiana Cavalry. 
He lost his right arm in July, 1864, at the battle of Kenne- 
saw Mountain, after which he received an honorable dis- 
charge and returned home. Mr. Jefferis was elected to repre- 
sent the county in the Legislature in 1856, and re-elected in 
1858, serving two terms. In 1865 he was appointed Internal 
Revenue Inspector for the Fifth Congressional District, and 
after serving a year and a half in that capacity he resigned 
and resumed his farming and stock-raising. 

Jonathan Marine, S}\, deceased, was one of the earliest 
settlers and most prominent men of his day, in New Garden 
Township. He was born in North Carolina, Feb. 15, 1780, a 
son of Jonathan and Mary (Charles) Marine, natives of Mary- 
land, of Irish descent. He was married in North Carolina, 
Nov. 16, 1800, to Hannah, daughter of Zachariah and Molly 
Moorman, also a native of North Carolina. In 1811, with his 
wife and five children, he came to Indiana and settled on 
what was known as the " New Purchase," now New Garden 
Township, on a tract of land now owned by his son Billy. 
The county was then a dense wilderness, with very few white 
settlers, and the land all unimproved. He erected a pole 
cabin as a shelter for himself and family, and afterward 
entered the land from the Government, paying $2.25 an acre 
for it. He was remarkably successful in his undertakings 



FRANKLIN TOWNSHIP. 413 

and his family received the benefit of his success. Although 
kind and generous to his own family he was not unmindful 
of the wants of others, but was liberal and thoughtful toward 
all needy, both of the white and red population, none being 
denied who asked assistance of hitn. He was one of the 
leaders in the organization of the New Garden Meeting of the 
Societ}' of Friends. While yet in the prime of life, in June, 1827, 
he was taken ill with a fever which caused his death. His widow 
survived him many years after, dying Nov. 5, 1861, aged 
eighty one years. They were the parents of nine children, 
eight of whom lived to maturity. Five lived to be over 
seventy years of age and three are still living — Jonathan. Jr., 
Ruth and Billy. 

Jonathan Marine^ Jr.., retired farmer, is the oldest living- 
native of New Garden Township. He was born March 4, 
1813, a son of Jonathan and Hannah (Moorman) Marine. He 
was reared on a frontier farm, and received his education in 
the subscription schools. His education was necessarily lim- 
ited as schools at that day were few and the teachers but illy 
qualified to give instruction. When he was fourteen years 
of age his father died and his mother was thus left a widow, 
and Jonathan being the oldestat home necessarily had the care 
of mother and farm and two younger children. He remained 
with his mother till manhood. Dec. 25, 1833, he was married 
to Piety, daughter of Benjamin and Leah Bogue, and soon after 
settled on a farm near Fountain City. He remained there till 
1850, when he bought the farm where he now resides, in Frank- 
lin Township. He has been a successful business man and a 
prominent man in the township. He is an active member of 
the Society of Friends, as was also his wife. Mrs. Marine 
died May 2, 1868. Mr. Marine had five children; one, at the 
age of twenty-three years, was drowned. 

Moorman W. Marine was born Sept. 8, 1841, in New 
Garden Township, Wayne Co., Ind., the second son "of Jona- 
than and Piety (Bogue) Marine. He was reared on the home 
farm till he grew to manhood and received his education in 
the common schools. At the breaking out of the late war he 
was one of the first to go out in defense of the Union, He 
enlisted Nov. 11, 1861, in Company C, Fifty-seventh Indiana 



414 HISTORY OF WAYNE COUNTY. 

Infantry, and immediately went South and joined the army of 
the Cumberland. He participated in many skirmishes and 
hard-lough t batth>s, among which may be mentioned the 
battle of Pittsburg Landing. In the winter of 1863 he 
was taken seriously ill and was in the hospital several weeks. 
He was afterward assigned to duty in tiie hospital remain- 
ing there till the expiration of his term of service, when 
he was honorably discharged, Nov. 21, 1861:. He then 
returned home and has since been engaged in farming 
and stock-raising. He was married Sept. 25, 1866, to 
Mary J., daughter of John and Abigail (Cramer) Keever, 
natives of Ohio and New Jersey respectively. They have 
had five children — Norma M., Jonathan F., Emma L., Ros- 
coe C, and Clara K., who died in infancy. Mr. Marine has 
resided on his present farm since his marriage. 

Nathan W. Martin^ eldest son of Benjamin L. and Sarah 
(Chrismond) Martin, was born Oct. 5, 1833, in Chester 
County, Pa. When ten years of age he came with his parents 
to Wayne County, and at the age of seventeen he went to 
Centreville and served as an apprentice at the harness-maker's 
trade nearly three years. He then engaged in boating on the 
Ohio and Mississippi rivers, from Cincinnati to New Orleans, 
for about two years, after which he worked on a farm for 
William Parney, for eight years. He then spent several 
months in Iowa, prospecting, etc., when he returned to 
Wayne County and was again employed by William Parney, 
with whom he lived till his marriage. He was married 
Marcli 4, 1860, to Arteliza, daughter of Alexander and Nancy 
(Russel) Cheesman, who were among the first settlers of 
Wayne County. He then resided on a farm in this county 
sixteen years and in 1876 he purchased an excellent farm of 
160 acres, where he has since followed farming and stock- 
raising. To Mr. Martin and wife have been born five chil- 
dren — Elmira, Martha, Sarah C, Alexander W., and one who 
died in infancy. Mr. Martin is a Republican in politics. 
Mrs. Martin is a member of the Methodist Episcopal church. 
Benjamin Moorman is one of the prominent men of Frank- 
lin Township, and has been from its earliest settlement one 
of the most industrious and influential citizens, assisting in 



FRANKLIN TOWNSHIP. 415 

clearing away the forests and in building up its homes and 
public institutions. He was born in Richmond County, N. 
C, Aug. 21, 1809, the eldest of seven sons, of John and 
Sarah (Smith) Moorman, and a grandson of Archelaus and 
Nancy Moorman. In 1816 his parents and grandparents 
came to Wayne County and entered land on section 10, 
Franklin Township, erected log cabins and began clearing 
frontier homes. His grandfather died at the age of eighty- 
four years, and his grandmother three or four years previous. 
His father lived to be ninety-two years of age. Archelaus 
Moorman was a prominent member of the Society of 
Friends. Benjamin Moorman lived with his grandparents 
from infancy and inherited their homestead where he has 
now resided sixty-eight years. He was married Jan. 19, 
1837, to Anna Turner, who was bjrn May 11, 1812, a daugh- 
ter of John and Rath (Morrison) Turner. They have no 
children, but several children have found a good home under 
their roof — Ruth Frazier, now Mrs. Davis Pyle; Eli Turner; 
John and Emma Turner, the former now deceased; Morrison 
Rich, son of Emma (Turner) Rich. John Turner now lives 
with and cares for them in their old age. Mr. and Mrs. 
Moorman are members of the Society of Friends. 

Richmond Moorman^ farmer and stock raiser, was born in 
Richmond County, N. C, Sept. 12, 1817, the youngest son of 
Tarlton and Hannah (Way) Moorman. Wlien he was an 
infant his mother died, and his father afterward married Re- 
becca Webb, and in March, 1822, they came to Randolph 
County, Ind., where our subject was reared on a frontier 
farm. His youth was spent in assisting his father in clearing 
and improving his farm, and in attending log cabin subscrip- 
tion schools. He was married March 20, 1839, to Mary 
Morris, born Dec. 1, 1818, in Wayne County, Ind., and a 
daughter of Jehosaphat and Sarah (Hill) Morris. They have 
had nine children, eight still living — Harriett, James M. , 
Sarah, Levi, Peninah, Nancy H., Joel H. and M. Alice. Jesse 
died in childhood. Soon after his marriage Mr. Moorman 
settled on a farm in Randolph County where he followed 
agricultural pursuits till his removal to Wayne County in the 
spring of 1859. He then bought a farm in New Garden 



416 HISTORY OF WAYNE COUNTY. 

Townsl)ip, where he resided three years, when he purchased 
the farm where he now resides in Franklin Township. Mr. 
Moorman has accumulated a good property hy his own in- 
dustry and economy. His farm contains 158 acres of im- 
proved land. He and his family are members of the Friends' 
society. During 1880 and 1881 Mr. Moorman and family 
resided in Fountain City. 

Harrison Nichols, farmer and stock-raiser, was born in 
Eush County, Ind., Nov. 1, 1839, a son of Rev. William and 
Sarah (Cook) Nichols, the former a native of Franklin 
County, Ind., and the latter of Virginia. He received his 
early education in the common schools, and later attended 
Hartsville University in Bartholomew County. He was 
married May 24, 1860, to Emm Simmonds, of Rush County. 
They have had five children — LeRoy, Thaddeus, Sadie, 
Sudie and Orr. The latter died at the age of two and a half 
years. After his marriage Mr. Nichols settled on a farm in 
Rush County, remaining there fifteen years. In October, 
1875, he moved to Wayne County and bought a farm in 
Franklin Township. He owns 100 acres of good land, well 
improved, with comfortable farm buildings. Politically he is 
a Republican. 

Nathan S- Overman^ farmer and stock-raiser, was born in 
Preble County, Ohio, July 14, 1822, eighth child of Jesse 
and Kesiah (Stubbs) Overman. He received his education in 
the subscription schools, and lived with his father till he 
grew to manhood. He was married Nov. 20, 1844, to Anna 
P., daughter of Frederick and Piety (Parker) Fulgliam, who 
were of French and English descent, and came from North 
Carolina to Randolph County, Ind., about 1821. Of the 
seven children born to Mr. and Mrs. Overman, four are liv- 
ing— Lindly F., Jonathan J., William A. and Rallie L. 
Those deceased are — Ruth, Anna J., Oliver M. and Nathan 
Albert. After his marriage Mr. Overman lived three years 
on his father's land, after which he entered 160 acres of land 
in Miami County. At the end of a year he returned to 
Wayne County, having traded eighty acres of unimproved 
land in Miami County for forty acres in Wayne County, 
where he resided till 1856. He then sold out and purchased 



FKANKLIN TOWNSHIP. 417 

a farm of 110 acres of well-cultivated land, where he has 
since followed agricultural pursuits. He and wife are 
members of the Society of Friends. Our subject's father 
was the son of Ephraim and Rachel (Small) Overman, who 
were natives of Virginia, and of German descent. He was 
born in Yirginia, and when a child moved with his parents to 
North Carolina. Previous to 1810 he moved with his parents 
to Indiana, where he was married to Kesiah Stubbs, who died 
in 1835. They had a family of fourteen children, of whom 
eight sons and two daughters still survive. He began life 
in limited circumstances but by hard work and good manage- 
ment he accumulated a large property and was enabled to give 
his children a start in life. He died in 1869, aged eighty- 
eight years. He and family were active members of the 
Society of Friends. Our subject's grandfather, Ephraim 
Overman, was a millwright by trade. He came to Indiana 
in a very early day and entered land where a part of Rich- 
mond now stands. He was elected by the people to represent 
the county in the Legislature for several terms. He died at 
the age of seventy-five years. His wife survived him many 
years, and died at the advanced age of over ninety-nine years. 
They were members of the Friends' society. 

Davis 8. Pyle was born in Franklin Township, Wayne 
Co., Ind., Oct. 26, 1843, a son of James and Ann (May) Fyle. 
When he was seven years old his father died, and he lived with 
his mother till one year previous to her death. He was married 
March 17, 1870, to Mrs. Rnth Jones, a daughter of Kathan 
and Mary (Turner) Frazier, who were early pioneers of Wayne 
County. They have had five children, two still living — Jane 
M. and Jessie L. Anna L., Arthur M. and Freddie are de- 
ceased. After his marriage Mr. Pyle lived one year on the 
land entered by his wife's grandfather, after which he resided 
one year on the old homestead. He then removed to Ches- 
ter, where he followed farming one year, and in 1873 he 
rented his present farm, which he afterward purchased, and 
which contains eighty acres of improved land. He is a mem- 
ber of the Methodist Episcopal church, and in politics he is a 
Republican. His father was a native of Chester County, Pa., 
and came with his parents to Wayne County, Ind. , when a 



418 HISTORY OF WATNE COUNTY. 

child. He toUowed farming through life, and died Oct. 26, 
1850. His wife was born in Monroe County, Ind., and came 
to Wayne County one year before her marriage. She died 
May 12, 1872. They were the parents of seven children, our 
subject being the third son. Two children are deceased. 

Isaac Pyle, eldest son of Isaac and Orpha (Addleman) 
Pyle, was born Aug. 18, 1813,' in Chester County, Pa. When 
thirteen years of age he came with his parents to Wayne 
County, Ind., where his youth was spent in helping his father 
on the farm and attending the subscription schools. When 
seventeen years old he began learning the plasterer's trade, 
serving as an apprentice three years, after which he worked a 
year at $16 per month. He then engaged in the same busi- 
ness for himself for thirty-seven years. Oct. 3, 1839, he was 
married to Elizabeth, daughter of John and Ruth (Morrisson) 
Turner, and to them have been born nine children — Ruth T. 
(deceased), Mary Jane, Orpha A., Isaac M., John T., Albert 
F. (deceased), Sandford C. (deceased), Elizabeth A. and 
Byron C. Since his marriage, Mr. Pyle has resided on his 
present farm, and in connection with his trade has carried on 
his agricultural pursuits, and now owns 115 acres of well- 
cultivated land. Mr. Pyle was reared in the Episcopal church, 
but afterward joined the Methodist church. His parents were 
natives of Chester County, Pa., his father a son of Ebenezer 
Pjle, of English descent, and his mother a daughter of Jo- 
seph and Sarah (Pierce) Addleman, of German descent. They 
were married in Pennsylvania, and were the parents of ten 
children. They came to Wayne County in 1826, and settled 
in Franklin Township, where Isaac followed farming and 
blacksmithing very successfully. He died at the age of about 
forty-five years; his wife survived him about thirty years. 

James J. Rhodes was born Oct. 31, 1833, in Preble County, 
Ohio, the youngest son of Samuel F. and Jane (Jones) 
Rhodes. He was ten years old when his parents moved to 
Wayne County, Ind., and at the age of eighteen years he left 
his home to learn the saddler and harness-maker's trade at 
Whitewater. He served an apprenticeship of two years, after 
which he worked as a journeyman till 1857. He then carried 



FRANKLIN TOWNSHIP. 419 

on the business for himself till the breakinoj out of the war. 
He enlisted Nov. 18, 1861, as a private in Company C, Fifty- 
seventh Indiana Infantry, and served for three years. He 
was honorably discharged Nov. 19, 1864. He was 
married March 20, 1858, to Lydia, daughter of A. B. and 
Nancy (Perkins) Elliott, by whom he had two children — 
James E. E. and one who died in infancy. Mrs. Rhodes died 
Jan. 13, 1865, and Dec. 13. 1866, Mr. Rhodes married Mrs. 
Susan (Sasser) Call, a daughter of William Sasser, of Ran- 
dolph County, Ind. They were tlie parents of seven chil- 
dren — Oliver M., Orville E., Samuel A., and four who died in 
infancy. After his return from the war Mr. Rhodes worked 
at the millwright's trade and in a saw-mill nearly two years. 
He has followed farming and stock-raising on his present 
farm since his marriage in 1866. In politics he is a Repub- 
lican, and he and wife belong to the Christian church. His 
father was born in Vermont, June 22, 1787, the youngest of 
eleven children of Hezekiah Rhodes, who came from Ger- 
many and served in the Revolutionary war with three of his 
sons. The family settled in New York State when Samuel 
was a boy, and in 1805 the latter came to Cincinnati, Ohio. 
In 1811 he married a daughter of James and Jane (Lee) 
Jones, the former a Captain in the war of the Revolution, 
who died while in the service. Samuel Rhodes served an 
apprenticeship of seven years at the boot and shoemaker's 
trade, and afterward became prominently identified with the 
business interests of Cincinnati as a tanner and a boot and 
shoe manufacturer, which occupation he followed till 1825. 
He then resided on a farm in Preble County, Ohio (where 
the town of El Dorado is now situated), until 1843, after 
which he moved to Whitewater, Ind., residing there till his 
death, July 5, 1860, at the age of seventy-three years. In 
politics he was a Democrat. His wife died Dec. 17, 1862. 
They were members of the Universalist church. Of their 
eleven children nine lived to maturit}^, and two sons and two 
daughters still survive. 

Robert Riley is a native of County Armagh, Ireland, born 
in July, 1833, a sou of William and Elizabeth (Taylor) Riley. 
His mother died when he was four years old, and his father 



420 HISTORY OF WAYNE COUNTY. 

two years later. He lived with relatives till eighteen years of 
age, and then came to the United States, landing in New 
York, May 1, 1851. His entire fortune at that tinie consisted 
ot one English guinea. He went up the Hudson River and 
found employment on a farm; remained there a year and then 
came West as far as Preble County, Ohio, where he remained 
a year. In the spiking of 1853 he came to Wayne County, 
Ind., and worked on Mr. Henley's farm, near Richmond, till 
1858. April 8, 1858, he was married to Esther Ann Lloyd, 
a native of Wayne County, and soon after went to Jay 
County, but remained only four months. He returned to 
Wayne County, and the following spring settled on the farm 
where he still resides. His wife died July 9, 1866, aged 
nearly twenty-seven years. Their only child, William, died 
at the age of two weeks. Jan. 15, 1871, he married Julia A. 
Pett}', a native of Fountain City. They have had four chil- 
dren; but two, Lucy Ann and Andrew, are living. V^irginia 
and Augustus are deceased. 

Joshua Skinner was born April 14, 1831, in Franklin 
Township, the second son of Joseph and Didiama (Eliot) 
Skinner, natives of North Carolina, the former born Feb. 10, 
1797, and the latter born Oct. 21, 1802. They emigrated to 
Wayne County, Ind., about 1817, and were married Oct. 19, 
1821. They were the parents of ten children — Sarah, Mary, 
Gilbert, Joshua, Rachel, Benjamin, Lot, Noah, John (de- 
ceased) and Cornelius. Joseph Skinner followed farming in 
Franklin Township, in which he was very successful. His 
death occurred July 20, 1882, at the advanced age of eighty- 
live years. His wife died April 30, 1879. They were active 
members of the Friends' society. Our subject was reared on 
a frontier farm remaining with his father till he grew to man- 
hood, and his education was obtained at the loij cabin sub- 
scription schools. He was married to Abigail, daughter of 
Joseph and Annie (Sullivan) Hiatt, pioneers of Wayne County. 
Of the six children born to them, four survive — Angeline, 
William F., Emma J. and . John K. and Daniel are de- 
ceased. Mr. Skinner has resided on his present farm since 
his marriage. He and family are members of the Society of 
Friends. Politically he is a Democrat. 



FBANKLTN TOWNSHIP. 421 

John R. Smith was born Jan. 1, 1813, in Montgomery 
County, Pa., the eldest son of John and Treathea (Roberts) 
Smith, who were natives of the same county and State, the 
former of German and the latter of Welsh descent. He was 
reared on his father's farm in Chester County, Pa., and when 
seventeen years of age he began to learn the blacksmith's 
trade, at which he served an apprenticeship of eighteen 
months. His health failing him he returned to farming, 
working out for six years. In May, 1839, he came to Wayne 
County, Ind. March 3, 1842, he was married to Sarah Ann, 
daughter of Jane and Elizabeth Frame, who came from Ches- 
ter County. Pa., in September, 1831. Thej^ have had eleven 
children — Tacy E., Caldwell G., James F., LydiaE., Maris F., 
Mary E.,Thomas A., Charles F., Willie (deceased), Ellis C. and 
Sarah J ane. After his marriage Mr. Smith rented land in 
Wayne Township about fourteen years and in 1856 he pur- 
chased his present farm in Franklin Township, which contains 
seventy-eight acres of land in a high state of cultivation. 

Hirmn Suplee was born in Chester County, Pa., April 6, 
1816, a son of Peter and Rachel (Hollowell) Suplee, natives 
of Pennsylvania, of English descent. He was reared on a 
farm till seventeen years of age when he went to learn the 
wagon and carriage maker's trade. He served an apprentice- 
ship of three years and three months, after which he worked 
one year as a journeyman. In April, 1837, he came to Wayne 
County and was successfally engaged in the manufacture of 
wagons at Hillsborough (now Whitewater) for fifteen years. 
He then operated a steam saw-mill until 1866, and in 1867 
he embarked in the mercantile business, wliich he followed 
till October, 1883, in connection with his other pursuits. He 
was married April 4, 1840, to Mary Moore, who died Jul^' 24, 
1877, aged fifty-nine years. She was a member of the Meth- 
odist Episcopal church. Of the eight children born to Mr. 
and Mrs. Suplee, three only survive — Jonathan F., Sarah 
Jane and Mary C. Ann Elizabeth died at the age of eleven 
months; Phoebe E., at the age of sixteen years; Rachel T., at 
the age of one year, and two died in infancy. In 1839 Mr. 
Suplee was elected Constable and held that office several 
years. In 1856 he was elected to the office of Magistrate, 



422 HISTORY OF WAYNE COUNTY, 

which position he held for twelve years, and in 1878 he was 
elected Township Trustee, holding that office four years. In 
politics Mr. Snplee votes the Republican ticket. 

David R. Taylor, farmer and stock-raiser, was born in 
"Wayne County, Ind., Dec. 16, 1822, the youngest son of Joel 
and Anna (Railsback) Taylor, his father a native of Virginia 
and his mother of North Carolina. They were among the 
first settlers of Wayne County. When he was three years 
old his father died. He remained with his mother till 
fourteen years of age and then began working for himself by 
the month. Although he received low wages he was econom- 
ical and industrious and saved enough to buy some land in 
Miami County, which he afterward sold at an advanced price. 
Sept. 25, 1847. he was married to Sarah A., daughter of Eli 
and Mary Bond. He rented land of Mr. Culbertson for a 
year, and then removed to a farm belonging to Isaac Lamb, 
where he lived three years; then lived seven years a half mile 
south of Webster. He then bought sixty acres in Wayne 
Township and lived there till 1865, when he sold it and 
bought his present home which consists of 100 acres, all well 
improved. Besides his home in Franklin Township he owns 
118 acres in New Garden Townsiiip and eighty-seven acres 
in Wayne Township. His wife died Nov. 23, 1853. They 
had two children — Virginia and William Henry, the former 
deceased. Sept. 21, 1856, Mr. Taylor married Elizabeth A., 
daughter of Shapley and Elinor (McConn aha) Barnes. They 
have two children — James S., born June 3, 1857, and Thomas 
C, born Dec. 2," 1859. Mrs. Taylor is a member of the Bap- 
tist church. 

Henry W. Thomas was born on the farm where he resides 
March 2, 1818, the eldest son of James P. and Ann (Wilkins) 
Thomas, and grandson of- Dr. John Thomas, one of the first 
physicians of Wayne County. The latter was a native of Del- 
aware, of Welsh descent. He came to this county in 1816 
settling on the farm where our subject now lives, and entered 
an adjoining tract of Government land which he cleared and 
improved. He at the same time followed his profession and 
built up a large practice. He died at the age of nearly eighty- 



FRANKLIN TOWNSHIP. 423 

eight years. Of his eight children only one survives — Mrs, 
Allen Brown, who is in her ninetieth year. James P. 
Thomas was married in Delaware, and in 1817 he came to 
"Wayne County and followed farming on the land entered by 
his father. He died in 1847, aged fifty-two years. His wife 
died in 1880, aged over eighty-four years. They were the 
parents of ten children, fi.ve of whom still survive. Oiir sub- 
ject was married Sept. 19, 1839, to Mary, daughter of Caleb 
Addleman, a pioneer of Wayne County. They were the 
parents of five children; two survive. His wife died in 1850, 
and in 1851 he married Susannah Addleman, a sister of his 
first wife, who died in 1859. They had two children, both 
deceased. In 1860 he married his present wife, whose maiden 
name was IMancy Alexander, a daughter of James and Mary 
(Parks) Alexander. Mr. Thomas's farm contains 150 acres of 
highly cultivated land. He and wife are members of the 
Christian church. 

John W. Thomas is Ihe second son of James P. and Ann 
(Wilkins) Thomas and grandson of the late Dr. John Thomas, 
who settled in Franklin Township in 1810 and was one o± 
the first physicians of Wayne County. John W. was born in 
Franklin Township, Wayne Co., Ind., Dec. 16, 1821. He 
was educated at the subscription schools, and lived with his 
parents till he grew to maturity. He was married Nov. 16, 
1843, to Elizabeth McPherson, of this county, who died Nov. 
17, 1881. They were the parents of twelve children, of whom 
only three survive — Hannon C, Sarah A. and Joseph H. Mr. 
Thomas worked at wagon-making for two years after his 
marriage, since which he has followed farming and stock- 
raising on a part of the old homestead. 

William H. Toivnsend, farmer and stock-raiser, was born 
on the farm where he now resides- May 13, 1841, the third 
son of Jesse and Ellen Townsend. His youth was spent in 
assisting his father in his agricultural pursuits and in attend- 
ing the common schools. He was married Dec. 13, 1862, to 
Mary J. Packer, a native of Hamilton County, Ohio, and to 
them have been born six children — Albert A., Ellen J., 
Johnny (deceased), Charles G., Emma L. and Jesse E. Mr. 
Townsend is probably one of the most successful farmers of 



424 HISTORY OF WAYNE COUNTY. 

Franklin Township, and has made his property by his own 
o-ood management. He has 200 acres of land under a hi^h 
state of cultivation. 

Eli Turner^ farmer and stock-raiser, was born Aug. 27, 
1826, in Pitts County, N. C, and is the eldest son of Joshua 
and Eliza (Tice) Turner, who were also natives of North 
Carolina. Our subject's mother died in 1831 and his father 
moved with his family to Indiana in 1834 and first settled on 
Green's Fork, where he followed farming a short time. He 
then removed to Franklin Township, where lie resided sev- 
eral years. Eli Turner found a home with Benjamin Moor- 
man, with whom he lived till he grew to manhood. He was 
married Aug. 5, 1858, to Gulielma, daughter of Samaei 
Edgerton, and to them were born six children — Ruth Ann, 
Samuel, Mary Jane, Louisa Ellen, Franklin and Elizabeth 
Yiola. He continued to reside with Mr. Moorman until he 
purchased the farm where he now resides, in 1860. Mr. 
Tamer has by his own industry and economy accumulated a 
good property, and now owns an excellent farm of 106 acres. 
He and his wife belong to the Society of Friends. 

John G. Wesler, contractor and builder, was born in Frank- 
Im Township, Wayne Co., Ind., Sept. 12, 1836, the eldest son 
of Thomas and Susana (Conkle) Wesler. His father was 
born in Chester County, Pa., April 13, 1799, and came to 
Wayne County in 1832. His mother was born in Philadel- 
phia, Pa., Aug. 9, 1806, and came to Wayne County in 1833. 
Jan. 30, 1834, they were married and settled on a farm on 
section 3, Franklin Township. The mother was thrown from 
a buggy and killed Sept. 30, 1878. The father died May 4, 
1881. They had a family of four children — John C, George 
W., the latter was killed by the explosion of a boiler in 
Randolph County, March 4, 1882; Susanna M., married 
William B. Graham Aug. 29, 1883, and one died in infancy. 
John C. was reared on a farm, residing with his parents 
until sixteen 3'ears of age when he went to learn the ma- 
son's trade. When eighteen years of age he took the con- 
tract to build the school-house on section 3. He followed 
contracting and building twenty years. In 1875 lie returned 
to his farm, where he has since resided. Dec. 12, 1858, he 



FRANKLIN TOWNSHIP. 425 

was married to Mary, daugliter of John and Patsey (Horn) 
Davis, who was born in "Wayne County, N. C, Dec. 7,1841, 
and came to Wayne County, Ind., with her parents in 1855. 
Of their four children but one is living: — "William H. Elnora 
died Oct. 1, 1873, aged twelve years; Yiola and Charley E. 
died in infancy. Mrs. Wesler died Nov. 5, 1875, and Oct. 4, 
1877, Mr. "Wesler married Annie B. Parrish, who was born 
in Ohio, Jan. 30, 1854. They have two children — Olive 
May, and Louie B. Mr. and Mrs. Wesler are members of the 
Methodist Episcopal church. 

Martin Wiley is a native of Franklin Township, Wayne 
Co., Ind., born Jan. 4, 1830, the youngest son of Edward and 
Nancy (Braden) Wiley, natives of West Virginia, who, when 
children j went with their parents to Kentuck}-, where they 
were reared and married. They afterward came to Indiana, 
where the father died May 17, 1850, aged sixty-five years, 
and the mother June 17, 1875, aged eightj^-one yeais and six 
months. Mr. Wiley spent his early life on the farm and in 
attending the common schools. He remained at home till 
his marriage and then bought forty acres of land a half a mile 
north of Bethel, where he resided four years. He then lived 
four years in Randolph County, when he bought the old 
homestead where he resided, with the exception of two years 
spent in Union City, till the fall of 1882, when he removed to 
Bethel. Mr. Wiley is a popular man in the township. He 
has served four years as Magistrate, and since 1880 has been 
Township Trustee. He was married Feb. 24, 1850, to Eliza- 
beth, daughter of Cornelius Yanmyer. They have three 
children — Nancy M., Cornelius E. and Abraham L. Mr. and 
Mrs. Wiley are members of the Christian church. Politi- 
cally he is a Republican. 

Peter H. Wright is one of the prominent and successful 
pioneers of Wayne County. He was born in Carroll County, 
Md., March 3, 1810, the eldest son of William and Celia 
(Wright) Wright, natives of the same county, of English de- 
scent. His parents removed to Wayne County, Ind., in 1825, 
and located in Clay Township. His father was by trade a 
wagon-maker, and he early learned the use of tools. When 
twenty-two ye^rs of age he left home and began to work at 
28 



42(> HISTORY OF WAYNE COUNTY. 

the carpenter's trade. The first year he worked by the 
month and then opened a shop of his own, continuing to work 
at hi8 trade till 1842, when he bought 200 acres of partially 
improved land on section 4, Franklin Township, which he 
added to from time to time till he owned 500 acres. He now 
owns 390 acres, having given the rest to his children. He 
was married June 15, 1837, to Catherine H., daughter of 
Joseph Morlatt. To them were born ten children; six are liv- 
ing — Enos, Levin, Mary R., Sarah, Andrew, Catherine. The 
deceased are — Ann, Basil B., Peter and William. Mrs. 
Wright died in April, 1854. Oct. 29, 1856, Mr. Wright mar- 
ried Mrs. Ann Joties, widow of Elihu Jones, and daughter of 
Joseph Bond. The}^ have four children — Thomas, Edward, 
Charles and Ellen. Mrs. Wright has four children by her 
former marriage — Jesse E., Martha, Amos and Joseph B. 
Mr. and Mrs. Wright are members of the Society of Friends. 

Samuel Wright, farmer and stock-raiser, was born in But- 
ler County, Ohio, Nov. 13, 1828, a son of John and Elizabeth 
(Stewart) Wright, his father a native of Virginia and his 
mother of Ohio. In 1831 they moved to Wayne County, 
Ind., and settled in Franklin Township, near Bethel, where 
his father died; his mother still resides in Bethel. Mr. 
Wright remained with his parents until his marriage, when 
he removed to Ohio and lived one summer. He then lived 
on the old homestead three years; afterward, on the farm cor- 
nering the old homestead two years, and in^Randolph County 
two years, and then ba-ck on a farm joining the old home- 
stead, and remained fourteen years. In 1873 he bought his 
present farm of eighty acres, good, well-cnltivated land; he 
has a good residence and comfortable farm buildings. Feb. 
1, 1849, he married Sarah, daughter of Nathan White, an 
early pioneer of the county. Nathan White's father was born 
in Scotland; was in the war of Scotland. Samuel and Sarah 
Wright have had four children — Elizabeth and Martha Ellen 
are still living; George Y. and Kebecca J. are deceased. Mr. 
and Mrs. Wright are members of the Christian church. 

S. K. Cojield, fourth son of Robert and Amanda (Wallings- 
ford) Cofield, was born in Ohio County, Ind., Oct. 6, 1838. 
When he was but twelve years of age his fathW died, and he 



FRANKLIN TOWNSHIP. 427 

was. left to care for and assist his widowed mother, with 
whom lie lived until his enlistment in war of the Rebellion. 
He enlisted in the United States service as private Aug. 11, 
1862, in Company B, Eighty-third Indiana Infantry. He 
was appointed First Sergeant Sept. 4, 1862; promoted to 
First Lieutenant Nov. 5, 1863, and to Captain Sept. 12, 1864. 
He was almost three years in active service; was in twenty- 
two engagements. Those most noted were the charges made 
at Vicksburg, May 19 and 22, with Sherman's cor[)S in his 
march from the Mississippi to the sea, and thence to Wash- 
ington. Captain Cotield passed through three years of 
danger and hard fighting, receiving but one wound that 
left a scar, which he received at Dallas, Ga. After the 
close of the war he returned to the home of his childhood, 
being welcomed back by a kind mother. Our subject married, 
Sept. 3, 1865, Mary A. Barker, daughter of Zachariah and 
Mary Barker. They have had three sons — Frank L., Kearney 
D. and Bert. 

H. O. Tillson. — The father of our subject, Luther Tillson, 
was born eight miles from Plymouth, Mass., in 1766, a son 
of Isaiah Tillson. From his twentieth to his twenty- sixth 
year he was a sailor on the ocean. He then went to Ver- 
mont, near Woodstock, and worked for his uncle, Daniel 
Perry, on the farm. The next year he married Mehitable 
Palmer, the daughter of an ingenius mechanic of Irish de- 
scent. He struggled with poverty till 1802, when he moved 
with his uncle to Ohio, landing at Cincinnati Dec. 25. The 
next year Mr. Perry bought the section of land of Congress, 
where is now the town of Summerville, Butler County, and 
sold Mr. Tillson 160 acres at Goverment price, giving him his 
own time to pay for it, without interest. He was so poor that 
he was obliged to work by the day to get bread for his fam- 
ily, and clear his own land at night. He sometimes walked 
thirty miles to buy bread-stuff, worked a day for a bushel of 
corn, and carried it home on his shoulder. In 1816 he sold 
his land, paid his uncle, and came to Whitewater, and bought 
three half (fractional) sections of land, in all 686 acres, on 
the State line, adjoining Wayne Countj^, and the next year 
moved his family to the new home. All the necessities of 
the family, such as milling, blacksmithing, schooling, and 



428 HISTORY OF WAYNE COUNTY. 

tradiiit; of all kinds, was mostly obtained in Wayne County. 
Mr. Tillson's constitution was much broken by the hardships 
endured in the new country. In 1817 his cares were in- 
creased, his faithful companion losing her mind. Although 
she lived nine years her mind was never fully restored, and 
she several times tried to take her life. In 1820 Mr, Tillson 
joined the Society of Friends at Woodbury meeting-house, 
Franklin Township, and became a prominent member. His 
wife died in March, 1826, and in July, 1827, he was laid by 
her side in the Friends' cemetery, at Woodbury. He had 
married again, Elizabeth Mitchell, and to his widow he 
willed all his personal property. Mr. Tillson had a family of 
ten children ; one died in Vermont ; the others were — 
Leonard, Gershom P., Isaiah, John, Oliver, Hosea C, Ira, 
Laura and Lucy. He taught his children to be strictly hon- 
est and punctual to all their promises, and in their sales to 
give good measure and weight, telling them that nothing was 
lost by giving good measure. He gave each of his sons 
eighty acres of wild land. H. C. being at the time a lame 
boy was given the old homestead. All the sons married and 
settled on their land save Ira, who died when sixteen years of 
age. They were all natural mechanics, and their genius was 
of benefit to their neighbors. Two of them became local 
preachers — Oliver, of the Methodist Episcopal, and H. C, of 
the Christian. The two latter are the only ones who became 
residents of Wayne County. H. C. Tillson traded the home- 
stead to his brother John for the latter's wild land and $400, 
the deed to be made when H. C became of age. In 1831 he 
was married to a daughter of the Anderson family. Their 
children are all dead except the eldest son, who lives in Ohio. 
His wife died, and in 1855 he married a daughter of Elihu 
Harlan. They have four daughters — Hannah Etta Anderson, 
Ella, Olive and Minnie. H. C. Tillson is now in the seventy- 
fourth year of his age, and has lived in Wayne County 
twenty-six years. He is the only one left of his father's fam- 
ily. He has been one of the foremost in advancing the inter- 
est of his adopted State and county, and is still doing all he 
can to build up and better the condition of society, physic- 
ally, morally and spiritually. 



CHAPTER XII. 



DALTON TOWNSHIP. 



Location and Organization. — Date of Existence, — Area 
AND Valuation. — Population. — The Steady Loss. — 
Aquilla West in 1818. — Other Pioneer Arrivals. — Its 
Wealth of Soil, Water and Drainage. — Village of 
Dalton. — When Founded. — Its Business and Profes- 
sional Men. — Franklin. — Its History Condensed. — 
Churches. — Biographical. 

location and organization. 

Dalton Township is in the extreme northwestern corner of 
the county, and is next to tlie smallest township in the county, 
Webster being the smallest. It is tour miles square, having 
sixteen sections, or 10,240 acres of land, of which 9,945.42 
acres are found on the assessment-roll. The real estate of 
the township was valued at $303,550 in 1882; personal prop- 
erty, $150,860; total, $454,410. 

Its population since 1850 has been as follows: 1850, 855; 
1860, T89; 1870, 766; 1880, 746— not a very alarming de- 
cline, yet surel}'' and steadily, which is not a hopeful sign. It 
was formed from Perry Township in June, 1847, and its vot- 
ing precinct was Franklin. The township lies nearly all west 
of the Twelve-mile Purchase, except a small strip on the east 
side. There were quite a number of settlers staked out their 
claims previous to the land coining into market, which was 
not till the fall of 1822, while its settlement was retarded on 
that account, as most settlers preferred to secure their lands 
by actual purchase before making improvements. Among 
the early arrivals was Aquilla West, who was in fact the first 
settler in the year 1818, on land now owned by Lindsey Den- 
nis, near the town or village of Dalton. After the land sal& 
he removed, being unable to purchase. James Lindley settled 

439 



430 HISTORY OF WAYNE COUNTY. 

on West River, where Jesse Fonts now lives. He removed 
to Howard County in about 1850. Others were Seth Mills, 
Thomas A^utrim, a Mr. Blount, who left before the land sale — 
Thomas Burroughs, who settled next to Randolph County 
line; Sampson Smith, Pleasant Harris, Benj. F. Beeson, who 
settled at Franklin; Thomas Marshall, Stephen Lear, Joseph 
Johnson, Peter Smitli, and perhaps a few others who, as 
squatters, had taken possession of nearly all the best land of 
the Nettle Creek Yalley within the township before the land- 
sale l)y the Government. Quite a number also settled 
in the valley of West River: Isaac Ruth, Henry Mills, 
Henry Thornburgh, Sr., and fonr sons, Sopiiia Williams, a 
widow, and her three sons — Henry, Matthew and Joseph, 
Joseph Brewer, Wm. Wright, across the line, Charles Howell, 
Isaac Macy, Jacob Bales, George Petro, a blacksmith (proba- 
bly the first in the township), James Strode, Wm. Thorn- 
burgh, Sr. These took possession of nearly all the best land in 
the West River Valley, most of them buying the land they 
had improved, at the land sale in the fall of 1822. 

Other early squatters off from the valleys were: Jesse Os- 
born and a man by the name of Charles Stout, who built the 
first grist-mill in the township, on West liiver — the present 
Brown Mill--in 1824-'5. 

Those who came soon after the land sale were Joseph Davis, 
Dan'l Uirich, Chas. Burroughs, Zachariah Beeson, Anthony 
Reynolds, Isaac Reynolds, Jno. Deering, Thomas Nicholson, 
and Thos. Antrim. Most of these named came from North 
Carolina, Tennessee and Pennsylvania. 

Many of these named have descendants now living; in the 
township. The majority were Quakers. 

Others who came soon after the land sale were Tense Mas- 
sey, Dempsey Thornburgh, Joseph Routh, Andrew Starbuck, 
Wm.Chamness, Esq., Sam'l Turner, John Lee, Enoch Gard- 
ner, Isaac Cavalt, John Evans (a Baptist preacher), Abraham 
Tout, Jonathan Evans, Jno. Smith, Aaron Lesh, Wright 
Spradlin, Geo. M. Lee, Benjamin Beeson, Wm. Beeson, 
Jae. Brewer. Nathan Baldwin and Wm. Maudlin came in 
1831; Samuel, Isaac, Isaac W. and Thomas E. Beeson about 
the same time; also Thomas Dennis and family, Isaac Macy, 
from Tennessee, Wm. Wright and Jesse Weaver. 



DALTON TOWNSHIP. 431 

Isaac Macy and Wm. Davis were the first Justices of the 
Peace of the township after its organization. 

The townshi}3 is well watered, on the east being the West 
Branch of Whitewater, entering the township about one 
mile south of the northeast corner, and flowing south 
through the township, and Nettle Creek on the west, enter- 
ing from the north, a mile east of the west line, and 
running due south. These streams have numerous small 
branches. Agriculturally speaking the land is of a good 
quality, and a half century and upward still finds it of suf- 
ficient productive quality as to well repay the husbandman. 
It is an agricultural township, and the farmers are all in 
good circumstances, and good citizens. 

DALTON FOUNDED. 

The town of Dalton was laid out by Tense Massey and 
Joseph Davis, proprietors, and Joseph Davis, surveyor. 
The plat bears date Jan. 25, 1828. An addition was af- 
terward made by Joseph Davis, and, in 1836, another by 
Nathan Baldwin. 

Tlie first store in the township was at Dalton, kept by 
Aaron Mills, and one started soon after at Franklin by 
Benj. F. Beeson. The first tannery in the township started 
by Benj. F. Beeson. The first grist-mill, in 1824, by Chas. 
Stout. Seth Mills erected the next flouring mill at Dal- 
ton in 1826, and a saw-mill was put up about the same time 
by Pleasant Harris and Tense Massey. In 1828 Benj. F- 
Beeson erected a grist-mill on Mill Branch, and the Beeson 
Bros, an oil-mill a year later. In 1832 Jesse Baldwin built 
another oil-mill. The Dalton Steam-Mill Company, was or- 
ganized with a capital stock of $10,000, and in 1837 erected 
on Nettle Creek a steam flouring mill, and also a saw-mill. 
These mills were destroyed by fire in 1848, and the saw-mill 
only rebuilt by Isaac Reynolds, who ran it until 1879. The 
Beeson Bros, erected a grist-mill on the site of their old 
oil-mill in 1840, and James Maulsby a grist-mill in 1850, on 
Mill Branch. The first oil and grist mills spoken of are gone. 
In 1853 Henry Thornburgh built a saw-mill, and a card-ma- 
chine was also started. They disappeared a decade ago. 



432 HISTORY OF WAYNE COUNTY. 

BUSINESS INTERESTS. 

The village of Dalton lias at this time two general stores 
and one grocery. It has two blacksmith-shops, one gun- 
smith, one wagon-sho)3, one steam saw-mill, built on the site 
of the old Dalton Steam-Mill Company's mill. The mill of 
Reynolds was torn down at the above date and a new one 
erected by Riley Chamness. 

Besides the store kept by Aaron Mills other merchants 
followed. Between 1838 and 1845 there were John W. Will- 
iamson, John T.Elliott and Henry D. Root; and at differ- 
ent times Joseph Ruth, J. and D. Canaday, David and Will- 
iam Chamness, Robert Lumpkin and Thomas McCracken, and 
since 1870 Wm. S. Chamness and Riley Chamness, both 
general stores. 

John W. Smith (botanic) was the first physician at Dalton, 
in 1836. Later were Wm. Dickey (1840), Drs. Simmons, J. 
R. Brown, Guinther, Windle, Showalter and John Stone- 
braker. 

Dalton had a population in 1870 of seventy-three, and of 
sixty-four in 1880. There has been no growth of the town in 
the past quarter of a century, and the population is now sup- 
posed to be only about sixty-five. 

POSTMASTERS. 

The postoffice was first known or named Palmyra, and 
Silas H. Beeson was appointed Postmaster May 25, 1835. He 
was succeeded July 26, 1837, by Isaac W. Beeson; then John 
W. Smith, Feb. 13. 1838; Charles Burroughs, April 23, 1840; 
Wm. Davis, May 30, 1842; Samuel Mitchell, April 15, 1846; 
Isaac Reynolds, April 6, 1847; Wm. O. Arment, July 31, 
1848; Henry D. Root, Oct. 30, 1850 ; Clarkson Reynolds, 
Jan. 20, 1853; John B. Routh, Jan. 30, 1854; Clarkson 
Reynolds, March 7, 1855; Wm. S. Chamness, Aug. 22, 1855. 

FRANKLIN. 

The town of Franklin was laid out by Benj. F. Beeson and 
Silas II. Beeson. The plat, signed by them as proprietors, 
and Thomas Stanford as surveyor, was recorded Jan. 7, 1832. 



DALTON TOWNSHIP. 433 

The town was platted in 1830. The first merchant, as above 
stated, was Benj. F. Beeson, and in 1839 Chas. Beeson was a 
leading merchant. The village has remained, like Dalton, at 
a stand-still. Following the Beesons were Silas Lewis, Aaron 
Lesh, Oliver and Joseph Williams. Silas B. Manlsbj, Benj. 
B. Beeson, Wm. Thornburgh, and Wm. and Enos Canaday are 
said to have traded at Franklin. And still later, in the sev- 
enties, John Macy, who ran a dry-goods store, and Millikin 
Hockett, a grocery house. Dr. Silas Beeson, the first resi- 
dent physician in the township, settled at Franklin about 
1830,and died there. Later were Drs. Henry Carver,Erhart and 
Patterson. It has now (January, 1881:) one grocer}-, a black- 
smith and wagon shop, one undertaking establishment, post- 
office, and about sixty-five inhabitants. 

From " Young's History " the following is taken: 

" The White Branch Woolen Mills are on the White Branch 
stream, two miles south of Franklin. A building was erected 
by Daniel Ulrich for a grist-mill, but he put into it machin- 
ery for a woolen factory. In the year 1851 it was bought by 
Wm. and Josiah Test. The establishment has since been 
much enlarged by the erection of buildings and the increase 
of machinery. Later its proprietors were Wm . and Rnfus 
Test, and Josiah Y. Jones (Test Brothers & Jones). It has 
two sets of machines and two roll-cards, and nine looms. 
The goods manufactured are jeans, satinets, cassi meres, flan- 
nels, blankets and yarn. Custom work, as carding, spinning, 
and cloth-dressing, is also done at this establishment. 

"The first school-house in the township is said to have 
stood where Dalton now is, and Luke Wiles to have been the 
first teacher." 

The first postoffice in the township was established in 
Franklin in the year 1832, and was called Palmyra. It was 
not long afterward removed to Dalton, but not until after a 
bitter fight had been waged. The name was changed to Dal- 
ton, and so remains. Another office v/as at last secured by 
Franklin, it being established in 1876, and called Nettle 
Creek postoffice. The office still remains. 



434 HISTORY OF WAYNE COUNTY. 

CHURCHES. 

The "West River Church, Quakers or Friends, was estab- 
lished in 1825, and in 1826 they erected a place of worship. 
Henrj' Thornburgh, Sr., was a leading spirit in the church. 
This building was of logs. 

The Nettle Creek church, of the same denomination, was 
organized in a school-house a few years later, or in 1828. Its 
leading spirits were Thomas Antrum, Jos. Davis, Zachariah 
Beeson and others. This church was near Franklin. The 
anti-slavery ao^itation caused a division at one time. 
Among the preachers were Revs. Miles Mendenhall, Mahlon 
Chamness and Mahlon Dennis. There are very few of the 
denomination now in the township. The same can be said 
of the Dunkards. 

BAPTIST CHURCH. 

The society had an existence for a few years in Dalton, its 
first organization being in 1835. The society held its meet- 
ings in a log house, having no church building. Afterward 
there was erected a frame church over the line in Randolph 
County, and the Dalton society united with them. Jas. 
Austin was the first preacher while in Dalton Township. 

UNITED BRETHREN. 

The LTnited Brethren have had a society and a meeting- 
house, about two miles east of Dalton, about twenty years. 
Ab. Tout gave the land for the graveyard, Lewis Weaver the 
ground for the church. Early members of this church were: 
Jeannetta Barr, afterward wife of Wm. Marshall, and her sis- 
ter Mary, wife of Abraham Smith; Henry Bailes, John 
Bailes, Lewis Bailes, Wm. Linley (now a Dunkard preacher). 
They have had as preachers. Dr. Richardson, Daniel Stober, 
John Brown, Alexander Carroll, Jas. M. Cook and others. 

A Methodist class was formed in Dalton for a short time, 
but it soon ceased to exist, and there is no M. E. church in 
the township. 

BIOGRAPHICAL. 

Nathan Baldwin, retired farmer, section 27, Dalton Town- 
ship, is the second son of Jesse and Hannah (Mendenhall) 



daltojSt township. 435 

Baldwin. He was born in Guilford County, N. C, May 16, 
1811. of English descent, and was educated at the log cabin 
subscription schools. He was reared a farmer, which occu- 
pation he has followed through life. He was married Feb. 
21, 1830, to Melinda Hinshaw, of Randolph County, K C, 
and the following fall came to Green's Fork, Wayne Co., Ind., 
and in the spring of 1832 lie purchased his present farm, then 
a dense wilderness, but now in a high state of cultivation. 
He had seven children by his tirst wife, of whom tliree are 
living — William, Mary and Newton. Henrj, Jesse, Setli and 
Hannah are deceased. His wife died Feb. 2, 1854, and he 
was again married Jnl}^ 27, 1856, to Rachel Reynolds, of 
Wayne County. Two children were given to this union — 
Melinda E. and Eliza J. 

George W. Bales^ iarraer and stock-raiser, was born in 
Henry County, Ind., June 4, 1843, the youngest child of 
Aaron and Susannah (Russell) Bales, natives of Tennessee, 
who removed to Union County, Ind., in an early day, and 
from there to Henry County. When he was three years of 
age his father died, and when quite young the care of the 
farm devolved on him and an older bi'other. In 1869 he 
bought eighty acres of land on sectior\ 23, Dalton Township, 
but subsequently moved to his present home, which is land 
entered by liis father-in-law, in 1837. He owns 160 acres of 
good land, all well improved. Mr. Bales was married May 4, 
1864, to Lucy Jane, daughter of Wright and Fanny (Weaver) 
Spalding. They have had six children — Yiretta, Josephine, 
Oliver, Edmund (deceased), John H. and Lewis (twins). Mr. 
and Mrs. Bales are members of the United Brethren church. 
Benjamin Beeson was born in Randolph County, N. C, 
about 1765, a son of Isaac Beeson, whose ancestors trace back 
to two brothers who came from England to Pennsylvania, 
with Penn's colony, but vfhose descendants all removed to 
North Carolina at an early day. His mother was of Irish 
descent. He was married about 1786, to Margaret Hockett, 
and about 1826 came to Wayne County, Ind,, and settled 
one mile south of Franklin. Their children were — Hannah^ 
who married Seth Hinshaw and lived at Greensboro, Henry 
Co., Ind.; Isaac W., whose sketch follows this; Will- 



436 HISTORY OF WAYNE COUNTY. 

iam^ who married Rachel Newman and had one son, 
Jehu, who was a Union refugee two years in the South, 
but escaped and came to Indiana in 1864, and settled 
in Plainfield; Margaret^ married Jesse Baldwin, came 
to Indiana about 1824, and lived one mile southwest of Frank- 
lin. Her children.were — Franklin Urbane, Elwood, Isaac and 
Nereus. Benjamin F.^ who came to Franklin in 1818, was a 
very large man, a good business man and greatly respected, 
he married Rachel Bales and had one daughter, Luzena, who 
married Greorge Shaffer and moved to Iowa. Silas II., who 
came to Franklin about 1823, was a prominent business man 
and the lirst physician in Dalton Township, having a large 
practice. He married tirst Rh^da Hubbard, second, Charity 
Ventres (by whom he had two children — Melvina and Louisa), 
and -third, Nancy Lumpkins. Rachel came to Franklin with 
her father, but never married. Ithamar came to Franklin 
about 1824; was Justice of the Peace many years. He 
married Folly Bales, by whom he had six children — Oli- 
ver, Lewis, William H., Margaret, Sarah and Cynthia E. 
Asenath never married. Charles came with his father to 
Wayne County and married Cynthia Baldwin. He lived one 
mile north of Franklin until about 1855, when he removed to 
Iowa, and from there to New Buffalo, Mich. He has three 
children — William, Jehu and Luvina. Ruth married James 
Maulsby, now of Danville, Ind., and had one son — Silas B. 
Benjamin Beeson's brothers and sisters were as follows — Isaac., 
who came to Wayne County about 1828, and settled one mile 
east of Dalton. He had twelve children — Hezekiah, Zacha- 
riah, Benjamin, Jesse, Elwood, Newton, Margaret, Zeruah, 
Mildred, Louisa, Mareb and Mariah. Samuel, who settled 
one-half mile east of Dalton in 1827, and had five children — 
Isaiah, Wade, Samuel, Elma and Isabel. Billy., who settled 
one-fourth mile south of Franklin in 1827, and had children 
as follows — Jonathan, Seth, Eunice, Elizabeth, Yancy, Charity, 
Melinda and two others. Hannah married Sammy Lamb. 
Isabel married William Chamness,and settled one mile north- 
west of Dalton. She had seven children— William, Joshua.Jo- 
se])h, l8aac,Mary,Jesse, and Hannah. Elizabeth married Jesse 
Wilson and had three children — Isaac; Elizabeth, who mar- 




^S VffArC.Kbevoete^ 



/..^. ^.^-^ 




-"^-'ig ■*- br H A-C KbevoeiS^--^- ' 



•^< 



<i2^ 



::k^;^^^>/ 



DALTON TOWNSHIP. 437 

ried Thomas Dennis, and lived one-half mile south of Dalton; 
Rachel, who married David Pidgeon, and lived two and one- 
half miles northwest of Dalton. Benjamin Beeson, like his 
ancestors, was a strict. Friend and the head of Providence 
Meeting in North Carolina several years. He was much re- 
spected, and died at an advanced age. He was buried by the 
side of his wife in West River Graveyard, two and a half 
miles east of Dalton, though their exact resting place is not 
known. 

Benjamin B. Beeson^ only son of Isaac W, and Mary 
(Branson) Beeson, was born March IT, 1843, on the old home- 
stead on which he now resides, one-half mile west of Dalton, 
Wajne Co., Ind. He is of medium stature (five feet, ten 
inches), and weight (150 pounds), fair complexion and gray 
eyes. He is a member of the Society of Friends. He was 
married Oct. 14, 1865, to Olinda Lamb, daughter of Thomas 
and Elvira (Finch) Lamb, The}' have four children — Isaac 
Francis, born Aug. 13, 1866; Mary Lenora, born Jan. 23, 
1868; Edward Orton and Frederick Loton (twins), born July 
3, 1877. For nxany generations the eldest son of the eldest 
son has been named Benjamin and Isaac, alternately. Ben- 
jamin B. Beeson, like his father, has devoted the most of his 
time to his home and farm, although now engaged in 
the goods business at Dalton. Realizing the need ol 
better roads in the neighborhood, he has devoted much time 
and attention, as well as means, to their construction. He 
assisted, financially and otherwise, in the construction of the 
Dalton Turnpike,of which he has been Treasurer since its con- 
struction, in 1876. He has also been Secretary and Treasurer 
of the Hagerstown and Bluntsville Turnpike the past six years 
and through his influence it has been made one of the best 
roads in the county. The two miles and over of free gravel 
roads adjoining his premises are sufiicient evidence of his en- 
terprise in this respect. Seeing the great need of co-operation 
and improvement among farmers,he became a charter member 
of Nettle Creek Grange, No.735, of which he is still a member. 
He has represented the grange in the County Council, and 
the county in the State Grange. No. 735 is one of the few 
granges that has stood the* storms of many winters. It has 



438 HISTORY OF WAYNE COUNTY. 

scarcely missed n meet'inor since its organization; has a good 
buildiii"- of its own, a good membersiiip and attendance, and 
is doing much for the education and improvement of its mem- 
bers. For the purpose of encouraging the agricultural inter- 
ests of this section of the county, a few kindred spirits 
organized the Wayne,Henry and Randolph County Agricult- 
ural Association in September, 1880, of which Mr. Beeson is 
President. Despite many disadvantages, this society has 
been very successful and gained an enviable reputation among 
societies of its kind. The Indiana Farmer sent a represent- 
ative to the fourth annual exhibition, held at Dalton, Ind., 
Sept. 4-7, 1883, from whose report we quote as follows: "Can 
a fair be made a success without racing and its attendant 
evils? This question has often been asked, but has been 
left to the managers of Dalton fair to answer that it can. The 
present is the fourth exhibition made by the society, and 
though racing, side-shows, games of chance, and everything 
of that class, so prominent at other fairs, are banished from 
the grounds, yet their fairs have increased from year to year, 
both in attendance and display. Much of the success is due to 
the energy of B. B. Beeson, the President, and Joel Replogle, 
Secretary." Politically, the sympathies of Mr. Beeson are 
with the producer and against monopolies, rings and party 
corruption. He heartily supported the administration of 
Lincoln, and the election of Grant for his tirst term, but be- 
came dissatisfied with his administration, and for several 
years was a member of the ISTational Central Committee of 
Wayne County, though he often voted independent of party. 
Financially he has been successful, is the largest tax-payer in 
the township, owning at the present time over 800 acres of 
land within its limits, being industrious and a large em- 
ployer of labor. Great improvements have been made in all 
property he has controlled. 

Isaac W. Beeson was born in Randolph County, JN". C, 
Dec. 19, 1789, the eldest son of Benjamin and Margaret 
(Ilockett) Beeson. Fie was of medium height (five feet, 
eight inches), and weight (145 pounds), fair complexion, dark 
hair and light-brown eyes. He was not very robust, but, 
being very temperate in his habits, enjoyed fair health till 



DALTON TOWNSHIP. 439 

past middle age. He acquired a good education for the time 
and taught scliool at different times. He learned the trade 
of a wheelwright when young, which he followed as occasion 
required as long as he lived, though he lived to see this once 
flourishing business obsolete, except for slight repairs. For 
many years he made it a point to lay up $100 a year from his 
trade, and in those times it required great industry to do so. 
The greater part of four years was spent in settling his 
brother William's estate, which was scattered over North and 
South Carolina, Virginia, Tennessee and Georgia, he being a 
great trader. This he did traveling alone on horseback, usu- 
ally starting with a pair of saddle-bags and one large wheel 
and two small ones, which were sold at the first opportunity. 
During this time he had many adventures, mishaps and es- 
capes, the details of which are lost. William was his favorite 
brother, and he always spoke in the highest terms of his 
brother William's ability and integrity. Early in life he be- 
came devotedly attached to Mary, daughter of Joseph and 

(Pickett) Branson, which was reciprocated, but, 

owing to interference of relatives, the intimacy was kept up 
only at rare intervals during his stay in " The Old North 
State." In the spring of 1822 he started for the then Great 
West. His outfit for the journey was one horse, a rustic 
cart, a skillet, a small pot for boiling vegetables, a tin pan or 
two, an outfit of pewter dishes for one, an ax, and a small 
supply of provisions, all of which, except the provisions, 
served for many other like journeys. He usually traveled 
alone and slept in the cart, seldom keeping company with other 
travelers. He landed in Wayne County, Ind., about eight 
weeks from the time of starting, in good spirits, but, like his 
outfit, worn and looking rather seedy. He examined the 
country pretty thoroughly, attended the land sales at Brook- 
ville, and made a number of entries, among others 240 acres 
of the land in Dalton Township, where he lived and died, and 
where his son, Benjamin B. Beeson, now resides. In those 
days hilly land with springs and running water was most 
sought after, the "flats" being regarded as worthless. Toward 
the fall of the same year he wended his way back to the 
sunny South and worked at his trade till 1828, when he again, 



440 HISTORV OF WATNE COUNTY. 

in the same manner, visited liis possessions in the wilder- 
ness of Indiana. Many interesting incidents occurred while 
makiiiii; these journeys. On one occasion, while traveling 
through Virginia, he ventured to put up with a settler, but 
the conversation and actions of the family not suiting him, 
lie went out to sleep in his cart, and linall}^ went to a large 
wood and passed the night. On returning in the morning 
he found that iiis cart and the neighborhood liad been thor- 
oughly searched for liim. He learned afterward that the 
place was a rendezvous for the rogues of that mountain coun- 
try. Old "Foxy," his horse, sometimes failed to see tlie pro- 
priety of climbing so many mountains. On one occasion he 
backed off the road until the cart became his master, and cart, 
horse and all went bumping and dragging down the mount- 
ain side several hundred feet, and came near tumbling into 
the Kanawha River. But, strange to say, old "Foxy" was 
ready for business, having onl}^ a few bruises and being 
minus a large quantitj^ of hair. He gave no more trouble, 
however, during that trip. At this time, 1828, there was 
quite a rush to Indiana from the older States, and many a 
race was made to Brookville and Indianapolis for "Congress 
land." Mr. Beeson entered several tracts in different parts 
of the State, and again returned South before winter. In 
the spring of 1833 he took his last view of the red gullies and 
sedge fields of his native State, and settled near Franklin, 
Wayne Co., Ind., where his father and several brothers had 
preceded him. The firm of Beeson Brothers, composed of 
S. H., B. F, and Ithamar Beeson, were doing a large mercan- 
tile business, liandling everj^thing from a drove of hogs to a 
coon skin, and furnishing goods to a large section of country. 
They also ran a tan-yard, grist-mill, etc. The town became 
widely known as " Beeson Town." Times were flush and 
speculation ran wild; every body seemed to be getting rich. 
But the end came; the bottom fell out of prices, as it were; 
pork sold for $1.25 per hundred, net; confidence was gone; 
and the Beeson Brothers found their business and fortunes 
hopelessly wrecked, Isaac W. losing heavily as security. 
During all this time the old attachment between hiinself and 
Mary Branson existed, and in the fall of 1837 she left home 



DALTON TOWNSHIP. 441 

and friends in North Carolina to join her fortunes with his. 
She arrived in Wayne County safely, and Feb. 27, 1838, they 
were married. An only son, Benjamin B., was born to them, 
March 17, 1843. Mr. Beeson took an active interest in the 
political and religious questions of his day. A member of 
the Society of Friends, he took sides with the anti-slavery 
ring. His views in church matters were of the most liberal 
kind, taking the ground that all Christians should become one 
brotherhood and one church, uniting on the vital principles 
of Christianity, but ha\ing perfect freedom of belief in re- 
gard to forms, ceremonies, etc. In politics he held that the 
people should govern in all things, direct; that all officers 
should be deemed servants, and receive wages only for servi- 
ces rendered; that all money should be made or issued by 
the Government and loaned to the people at a low rate of 
interest, said interest to be used for improvements and ex- 
penses, in lieu of taxes. These view's were advanced by him 
long before the Rebellion, and MSS. left show that he was 
an original thinker and a writer of much ability. In finan- 
cial matters his judgment was good, having acquired quite a 
competence. Of a quiet disposition he never sought public 
favor in the way of office; would usually suffer heavily rather 
than go to law, believing in arbitration, both between indi- 
viduals and nations. He lost his companion Oct. 10, 1851, 
and never again married. She was a woman of kind and 
benevolent disposition — one of the few who had no enemies. 
Although his health was poor at this time he survived her 
twenty years, and died of an attack of pleurisy, Nov. 26, 
1871, aged eighty-two years, and was buried in the Friends' 
graveyard at Nettle Creek, near his faithful partner in life's 
joys and sorrows. 

Thomas Beeson^ farmer and stock-raiser, was born in Ran- 
dolph County, N. C, a son of Isaac K. and Rebecca (Lamb) 
Beeson, natives of the same county, of English origin. When 
a child his parents removed to Guilford County, N. C, and 
in 1845 he came with his parents to Park County, Ind., where 
his father died three years later. He then lived with his 
mother in Henry County till about 1863, when he came to 
Wayne County, and was married April 5, 1863, to Deborah 
" 29 



442 HISTORY OF WAYNE COUNTY. 

A., daughter of James and Mary (Roe) Strode, natives of 
Kentuckv, who were among the early settlers of Wayne 
Countv. They first lived several years in Jefferson Township, 
and about 1830 removed to the Strode homestead, where they 
spent the rest of their lives, and where our subject has resi- 
ded since his marriage. Mr. and Mrs. Beeson were the par- 
ents of two children — Sarah A. and Mary E. Mrs. Beeson 
died Jan. 22, 1883. She belonged to the United Brethren 
church. Mr. Beeson was i-earyd in the Society of Friends, 
but when twentj^-three years of age joined the Christian 
church in Blue River To.vnship, Henry Co., Ind. 

James E. and John E. Brown^ millers and farmers, Dal- 
ton Township, are the twin sons of John P. and Annie (Shep- 
pen Brown, the former born in Butler County, Ohio, Nov. 
16, 1827, and the latter July 2, 1822. They came to Fount- 
ain City, Ind., with their parents about the year 1837, where 
they were married June 24, 1848. John P. was a tailor by 
trade, but since his marriage he has followed farming. Our 
subjects were born May 15, 1851, in Fountain City, Ind.; 
were reared on a farm, and educated in the common schools. 
James E. also attended the Union Christian College at Me- 
rom, Ind., a short time. In 1870 he began learning the 
miller's trade, serving an apprenticeship of five years. John 
E., on leaving school, engaged in farming. In 1875 the broth- 
ers had about $700 each, with which they purchased the 
flouring mill in Dalton Township, Wayne County, James E. 
attending to the mill while John engaged in farming, and by 
their industry and strict attention to business they are now 
worth $10,000. John E. was married Dec. 10, 1871, to Eliza- 
beth, daughter of Elijah and Elizabeth (Smith) Clark. They 
have had two children — Birda, born in Montgomery County, 
Sept. 5, 1872, and Nellie, bora in Wayne County, April 17, 
1876. He and his wife are members of the Methodist Epis- 
copal church. James was married May 17, 1877, to Helen M., 
daughter of R. C.^and Sarah (Thornburgh) Cheesman. They 
were the parents of one daughter — Laura, born March 29, 
1878, and died Nov. 17, 1881. 

Larkhi Chamness^ farmer and stock-raiser, was born in 
Dalton Township, Wayne County, Ind., June 19, 1829, and is 



DALTON TOWNSHIP. 443 

the third sou of William and Annie (Eejnolds) Chamness. 
He was reared on a frontier farm and educated in the sub- 
scription schools. He resided with his parents till his mar- 
riage, which took place Dec. 2, 1868, with Ruth Lamb, born 
Oct. 20, 1842, and daughter of Miles and Najicj Lamb, of 
Henry County, Ind. They have two children — Lettie M., 
born Sept. 19, 1869, and Oliver P., born Jan. 19, 1877. In 
the spring of 1869 Mr. Chamness moved on his present farm, 
which contains eighty acres of well-improved land. Politi- 
cally he is a Republican. Mrs. Chamness is a member of the 
Wesleyan Methodist church. 

William Chcmmess^ fifth child of William and Isabel (Bee- 
son) Chamness, was born June 26,1802, in Randolph County, 
N. C. He was educated in the subscription schools of his 
native county, and in 1823 came to Wayne County, where he 
entered eighty acres of Government land, which he cleared 
and cultivated. He was married in 1825 to Annie, daughter of 
Ebenezer and Rachel (Green) Reynolds, natives of North 
Carolina, who came to Wayne County in 1819. They were 
the parents of six children, four still living — Jahen, Riley, 
Larkin and Seth. Those deceased were — Maliala and Isom. 
Mr. Chamness followed farming through life with success, 
and has given his children a good practical education. He 
served as Magistrate for twenty years, besides holding other 
local offices of responsibility. 

Nehemiah Gheesman^ deceased, was born in the year 1804 
in New Jersey, and when twelve years old went with his par- 
ents to JS[ew Lebanon, Ohio, residing there one year, and in 
1817 came to Wayne County, Ind., locating near Richmond, 
where he grew to manhood. He was married in 1828 to 
Rebecca Cornelius. They were the parents of four children 
— Richard C, Elizabeth, David and Thomas. After his mar- 
riage Mr. Cheesman engaged in the mercantile business in 
Centreville for three years, when he sold out and purchased 
a farm in Henry County, residing there some time. His wife 
died in 1832, after which he sold his farm and engaged in 
surveying St. Joseph and La Porte counties, Ind., for six 
mouths. He taught school for a time, after which he pur- 
chased a farm in Dalton Township, on which he built a flour- 



444 HISTORY OF WAYNE COUNTY. 

in^ mill, following farming and milling till 1856. He then 
manufactured lumber near Hagerstown about two years, after 
which he engaged in the mercantile business and kept hotel. 
His death occurred April 19, 1882, after a long and useful 

life. 

Richard O. Cheesrnan, son of Nehemiah Cheesman, was 
born near Centreville, Wayne Co., Ind., Oct. 4, 1829. He 
spent his youth in assisting his father » n the farm and in the 
mill. He was educated in the common schools, and lived 
with his parents till he attained his majority. He was mar- 
ried May 26, 1860, to Sarah F. Thorn burg, born Aug. 30, 
1831, in Wayne County, a daughter of Jesse and Margaret 
Thornburg. They have had nine children, six still living — 
Eebecca C, Helen M., Mary J., Wallace, Harry T. and Ed- 
ward M. After his marriage his father gave him a half-inter- 
est in the grist-mill in Dalton Township, where he was 
engaged one year, after which he traded his interest for a 
farm near Hagerstown, residing on it one year. He then 
purchased the old homestead, where he has since followed 
farming. He has also been extensively engaged in dealing 
in stock and packing pork. He had 100 acres of land, but 
has given part of it to his children. He has at present a fine 
farm of 350 acres of well-cultivated land. Mrs. Cheesman 
is a member of the United Brethren church. 

Wallace Cheesman^ farmer and stock-raiser, section 26, 
Dalton Township, was born March 13, 1861, in Dalton Town- 
ship, Wayne Co., Ind., and is the eldest son of Richard and 
Sarah (Thornburg) Cheesman. He received his education in 
the common schools, and resided with his parents on the 
farm till he grew to manhood. He was married March 13, 
1881, to America J. Lumpkins, a daughter of Rufus M. and 
Rachel (Jordon) Lumpkins. They are the parents of one 
daughter — Ora May, who was born Oct. 13, 1882. 

Branson Dennis^ farmer and stock-raiser, was born May 
10, 1818, in Randolph County, N. C, and when four years 
old was brought by his parents, Thomas and Elizabeth (Wil- 
son) Dennis, to Wayne County, Ind,, where he was reared 
on a farm, receiving his education in the subscription schools. 
He resided with his parents till he was twenty-two years of 



DALTON TOWNSHIl'. 445 

age. May 20, 1840, he was married to Elrna Reynolds, 
daughter of Job and Phoebe (Hocket) Reynolds, who came 
to Wayne County from Randolph County, N. C, in 1839. 
They liad a family of six children, four now living — Louisa, 
Phcebe Jane, "Wilson and Job. Sarah and Margaret are de- 
ceased. After his marriage Mr. Dennis lived three years on 
a farm in the southeast quarter of section 3, Dalton Township, 
and then moved to the farm in the southwest quarter of the 
same section, residing there until about 1857, when he pur- 
chased tiie farm where he has since resided, with the exception 
of a time spent in Spicelaud for the purpose of giving his 
children better educational advantages. In connection with 
his farming pursuits Mr. Dennis has been extensively en- 
gaged in milling, running a saw-mill about fourteen years 
and a flouring mill two years. He is a member of the Soci- 
ety of Friends. 

Lindsey Dennis, third son of Thomas and Elizabeth 
(Wilson) Dennis, was born in Randolph County, ]>[. C, 
March 8, 1822. When ah infant his parents removed to 
Wayne County, Ind., where he attended the subscription 
schools. He was reared on the farm and resided with his 
parents till he grew to manhood. He. was married Nov. 24, 
1841, to Irena, eldest daughter of Dempsey and Jane (Mills) 
Thornburgh, of Dalton Township. They have had seven 
children — Martha J., Melinda, Cynthia, Mariam (deceased), 
Dempsey T., Mary Ann and Oliver L. After his marriage 
Mr. Dennis settled on a farm in Henry County, residing 
there one year, when he sold out and purchased the farm 
where he has since made his home. He has helped each of 
his children in getting a home and has eighty acres of well- 
improved land left. He and wife are members of the 
Society of Friends. 

Nathan Dennis, born in North Carolina, March 13, 1815; 
died at his home in Dalton Township, Wayne Co., Ind., 
Jan. 26, 1872. He removed with his parents about 1833 to 
Wayne County, and was one of the pioneers who felled the 
forests and reduced the wilderness to one of the finest farm- 
ing districts in the State. He belonged to the Society of 
Friends and for the last thirty years of his life was one of 



446 HISTORY OF WAYNE COUNTY. 

the leading members of Springfield Monthly Meeting. He 
was for several years clerk of that body and for more than 
twenty years clerk of the meeting for ministry and over- 
sight. He had the confidence of the entire communitv as 
few men ever get it; and his counsel was in demand on all 
important subjects, both in and out of church circles. He 
espoused the cause of the slave and was a conductor on the 
now historic underground railroad, and yet he did not join 
in with the separatists on the ground that they inconsistently 
neglected other matters of the law of like if not of equal 
importance. Gifted with the ability to see all'sidesof a ques- 
tion, enthusiastic for every phase of the right as he under- 
stood it, consistent as the brook in his meadow which sought 
its home, the sea, by the most accessible and so the most 
practicable route, progressive but not imperious, he was a 
man to educate, mold, and uplifc community, not to disturb 
it or lead it in lines. He never lost an opportunity to build 
up the educational interests of his neighborhood and family; 
he got up at two o'clock one winter morning and walked a 
mile and a half with one of his boys, and they sawed five 
large ash logs that his boy might not miss his morning lesson 
in algebra at the district school. It is with pleasure that we 
record that during twenty years of daily intercourse with him 
we never saw him lose his temper. His religion, complete 
from whatever standpoint, was without ostentation or affecta- 
tion; rich in faith and grace yet not less rich in good works, 
whether he is to be tried by the first commandment of the 
decalogue or by the test that enrolled Abou Ben Adhem at 
the head of the list, his claim for a place will still be most 
generously granted by those who know him best. 

Oshorn Dennis^ son of Nathan and Mary (Lamar) Den- 
nis, was born Sept. 4, J 842. He resided with his parents on 
a farm until he arrived at manhood. His education was 
common-school, academic, and one and a half years in the 
Illinois State University. He belongs to the Society of 
Friends, having filled many stations in said society to the 
full approbation of his friends. He was appointed to the 
office of an Elder in 1879, which position he still holds, the 
duties of which he has discharged faithfully. Feb. 6, 1868, 



DALTOJSr TOWNSHIP, 447 

lie was married to Louisa Canada. The fruits of the union 
were three children — Mary E., was born Dec. 12, 1868, in 
Randolph County, Ind.; George P., was born Dec. 3. 1871, in 
Wayne Connty; Osborn Earl was born March 24, 1880, in 
Wayne County. The subject of this sketch has' followed the 
professions of farming and school teaching, having only 
missed teaching two years during the past twenty-two years. 
Has always been a man of good moral character, honest in- 
tegrity and uprightness of life, and has yielded quite an in- 
fluence in the community in which he has resided. 

Thomas Dennis, deceased, son of William and Delilah 
(Hobbs) Dennis, was born Nov. 4, 1791, in Randolph County, 
]S. C. In his early life he followed farming until he 
was near twenty years of age, when he commenced to 
learn the potter's trade, which he followed with that of farm- 
ing until his removal to Wayne County, Ind., landing Oct. 
1, 1822, in the city of Richmond, Ind., the journe}' being 
made with a four-horse team, and taking six weeks to accom- 
plish the journey. He first located near Dublin, but the 
wolves being so troublesome he went to Perry Township, 
near Economy, where he wintered, purchasing during that 
time ninety acres on Green's Fork, one mile south of Washing- 
ton, where he rebided until Oct. 1, 1831. He then purchased 
the farm in Dalton Township of Pleasant Harris, which has 
long been known as the Dennis homestead, first buying 154 
acres, to which he soon added eighty acres more. He was 
married March 24, 1813, to Elizabeth, daughter of Jesse and 
Elizabeth Wilson. They were the parents of ten children, 
eight of whom were reared to maturity, and seven now liv- 
ing — Wilson, Lucinda, Branson, Cjnthia, Lyndsey, Miriam 
C, William (who died in infancy), Elizabeth, Thomas, and 
Malinda, who died at the age of seven years. Miriam C. died 
April 2, 1880. She was first married to Josiah Test, and 
afterward to Jacob Pickering, with whom she lived a few 
days over ten years. Her disease was that ot" cancer of the 
stomach, producing great suffering, which she bore with 
Christian fortitude. Mr. Dennis was an active member of 
the Society of Friends, and a staunch anti-slavery man, who 
could not bear the idea of rearing his children in the midst of 



448 HISTORY OF WAYNE COUNTY. 

slavery. He also performed the duty of enlisting the per- 
sonal property and polls for taxation in the spring of 1839 in 
the western part of Wayne County, embracing that part in- 
cluded in townships 16, 17 and 18, congressional, in range 
12, east. He also was appointed Treasurer of the county the 
same year, being actively engaged in the duties thereof when 
taken with the illness which terminated fatally Sept. 4, 1839, 
on the Dennis homestead. His wife occupied the homestead 
until May 21, 1863, when she bade farewell to all transitory 
things here below. 

Wilson Dennis, farmer and stock-raiser, eldest son of 
Thomas and Elizabeth (Wilson) Dennis, was born June 1, 
1814, in Randolph County, N. C and when eight years of 
age came with his parents to Wayne County, Ind. He was 
reared on a frontier farm and educated at the log cabin sub- 
scription scliool. He being the eldest son, the work of clear- 
ing the land devolved on him in a measure, and he assisted 
in clearing and improving three heavily timbered farms, and 
helped to support his widowed mother and family till 1847. 
He was married Oct. 21, 1847, to Rachel, daughter of 
Dempsey and Jane (Mills) Thornburgh. Three of their six 
children are living — Lydia, married Sylvester Billheimer, and 
resides in Franklin, this county; Elizabeth, married William 
D. Jordan and lives on West River; and Thomas, married 
Zenorah E. Davidcon, and resides on the east line of Henry 
County. William died when twenty-two months old; Susan 
died June 27, 1861, aged eight years, seven months and eight 
days; and Mary Jane died in infancy. Rachel Dennis died 
Jan. 17, 1857, aged twenty-nine years, six months and twenty- 
nine days. June 23, 1858, Mr, Dennis was married to 
Lydia, daughter of Isaac and Taraar (Hawkins) Reynolds. 
They have had three children — Sarah, Clarkson and Isaac L. 
During several of the winters from 1835 to 1850 Mr. Dennis 
taught school. He settled on his present farm in 1848, where 
he has since followed farming with success, and also by ap- 
pointment has filled several of those trusts incident to execu- 
tors, administrators, commissioner and trustee, from the year 
1839 up to the present. At no time since 1839 has he been 
free from tlie duties requisite to such trusts. He and his 
wife are active members of the Society of Friends. 



DALTON TOWNSHIP. 449 

William H. Harris is the eldest son of Obadiali and Eliz- 
abeth (Bales) Harris, and a grandson of Obadiah Harris, who 
came from North Carolina to Wayne County in 1810, where 
he was for many years a pioneer minister in the Society of 
Friends. The latter afterward purchased land in Randolph 
County, where he died, in his eighty-sixth year. William H. 
was born in Randolph County, Ind., March 22, 1830, where 
he was reared on a farm and educated at the common schools. 
He lived at home till he was twenty-two years old, when he 
clerked in a general mercantile store in Randolph County 
two years. He then purchased the stock and engaged in busi- 
ness there till 1856, and, with the exception of three years, 
has followed the business ever since. He has carried on a 
good business since coming to Dal ton in September, 1874, 
and has been Postmaster of the place since 1876. He was 
married Oct. 3, 1856, to Sarilda, daughter of James and Na- 
omi (Lewis) Harris, early settlers of Wayne County. They 
have had five children, all deceased — Lula C, born Jan. 
21, 1858, and died Aug. 27, 1863; William E., born March 
13, 1862, and died Aug. 9, 1863; Branson S., born Sept. 11, 
1865, and died Oct. 3, 1867; John M., born Feb. 3, 1868, 
and died Feb. 12, 1869, and India M., born Nov. 22, 1869, 
and died July 15, 1870. Our subject's father was born in 
1808 in North Carolina, and when two years old moved with 
his father's family to Wayne County, Ind. He lived on the 
home farm till he grew to manhood, and was married in 1828 
to Elizabeth Bales, a native of Highland County, Ohio, and a 
daughter of Curtis and Elizabeth (Evans) Bales, who came to 
Wayne County when Mrs. Harris was a child. Of the eight 
children born to this union five still survive. Mrs. Harris 
died in 1853. After his marriage, Mr. Harris was engaged 
for many years in farming and blacksmithing in Randolph 
County, and in 1863 moved to Iowa, where he followed farm- 
ing till his death, which occurred Jan. 1, 1881. 

George M. Jordan^ retired farmer, section 24, Dal ton 
Township, was born April 26, 1813, in Boston Township, 
Wayne County, eldest son of William and Mary (Mc- 
Lelland) Jordon, natives of Pennsylvania and Ireland re- 
spectively. William Jordon came to Wayne County with his 



450 HISTORY OF WAYNE COUNTY. 

father's family in 1808 and entered Government land, where 
he resided till the breaking out of the war of 1812, in which 
he served fifteen months. He was married in 1812, and in 
1815 sold his land in Boston Townsliip and entered land in 
Perry Township, which is now owned and occupied by his 
grandson, T. J. W., where he resided till his death, which 
occurred Sept. 21, 18Y8, aged eighty-six years. Of his eleven 
children seven survive — George M., John W., Rachel, Rus- 
sell, William A., Wiley S. and Nancy L. ; Jane, Margaret, 
James R. and Elizabeth A. are deceased. Mrs. Jordon is 
still living at the advanced age of ninety years. George W. 
lived on the farm with his parents till he grew to manhood. 
He was married Nov. 22, 1832, to Barsheba R., daughter of 
Samuel Pollard, a native of Kentucky, who came to Wayne 
Countj', Ind., in 1822 and settled near Hagerstown. Mr. and 
Mrs. Jordon have had seven children, of whom four are liv- 
ing — Mary R., William R,, Wesley S. and Sarah E.; Samuel 
P., Henry C. and John C. are deceased. After his marriage 
Mr. Jordon settled on the farm where he has since followed 
agricultural pursuits very successfully. 

William. D. Jordoji, farmer and stock-raiser, section 24, 
Dalton Township, was born in Dalton Township, Wayne 
Co., Ind., Jan. 1, 1847, a son of John W. and Catherine 
(Davidson) Jordon. He was reared on a farm and educated 
at the common schools, after which he engaged in teaching 
in the winter and farmed during the summer seasons till he 
was twenty-five years ^old. He was married Oct. 10, 1872, to 
Lizzie, daughter of Wilton and Rachel (Thornburg) Dennis, 
of Dalton Township. After his marriage he settled on the 
old homestead, where he has 167 acres of highly cultivated 
land. Mr. and Mrs. Jordon are active members of the Meth- 
odist Episcopal church. They are the parents of two children 
—Nellie F. and Frank W. 

Nathan Lamar resides near Dalton, Wayne Co., Ind. His 
parents, Samuel and Judith (Baldwin) Lamar, were married 
Nov. 23, 1842, in Wayne County, Ind., and settled soon after 
in Henry County, Ind., on a farm, on which they lived until 
death. His mother died June 7, 1852, at the age of thirty- 
three. His father, who was a teacher in the public schools, 



D ALTON TOWNSHIP. 451 

during several of the winter terms, within the last twelve 
or thirteen years of his life, took special pains to educate 
his children and to train them during his short stay with 
them to live a religious life. He deceased May 10, 1860, 
at the age of forty-one years. Nathan Lamar was born in 
Henry County, Ind., Sept. 1, 1843. His early life was 
spent on the farm of his father. His schooling was 
derived chiefly from the district schools and the assistance of 
his father. Farming has been his special profession, although 
he has been engaged in teaching in the fall and winter terms 
of school for the past seventeen years. At the age of twenty 
he enlisted in Company B, Fifth Indiana Cavalry, to serve as 
a soldier in the war of the Rebellion, for three years or during 
the war, and was actively engaged in the principal engage- 
ments of the Atlanta campaign, and was with General Stone- 
man at the time he made his raid around Atlanta to Macon, 
Ga.; was taken prisoner at the titne of Stoneman's defeat and 
surrender near Macon, Ga., July 31, 1864, Stoneman and 
his principal officers being taken at the same time. He was 
confined as a prisoner of war nine months, most of the time 
at Andersonville, being one of the last squad of prisoners 
that ever passed out through the prison gates of Anderson- 
ville, and one of but few of his comrades who lived through 
the horrors and cruelties of Andersonville Prison. He was 
released with about 2,000 others, at Baldwin Station, ^la., 
by the prison commander Wirz, without being exchanged, 
the war being about over, April 30, 1865. It was sixteen 
miles to the nearest Union post at Jacksonville, Fla., and a 
great number died on the road between Baldwin Station and 
Jacksonville. He got to the Union lines at Jacksonville 
May 1, 1865. The horrors of the rebel prison are familiar to 
all. He was honorably discharged June 16, 1865, at Camp 
Chase, Ohio. He was married Aug. 21, 1867, to Alice Bill- 
heimer, of Dublin, Ind. He has served as the Assessor of 
Dalton Township since 1873, with the exception of one year, 
1875. His present term of office will expire April, 1886. His 
children are — Willie (who died in infancy), Frank S., Effie L., 
Mary F. , Nellie M. and Frederick C. 



452 HISTORY OF WAYNE COUNTY. 

John A. Locke, farmer and stock-raiser," was born in Wayne 
County, Ind., May 22, 1819. His father, William Locke, was 
a native of Granville County, JST. C , a son of John Locke, a 
soldier in the Kevolutionary war. His mother was Damaris 
(Mills) Locke, a native of Stokes County, JS". C. His parents 
were married, in Jefferson County, Tenn., June 6, 1808, and 
in 1815 came to the Northwestern Territory, and settled in 
Perry Township, Wayne Co., Ind., on land entered from the 
Government. William Locke was a man of untiring energy, 
and although he started in life with nothing he accumulated 
property till he was the owner of 1,900 acres of fine land, 
thus being able to give each of his children a good home. 
He opened the first store and established the first tannery in 
Perry Township, and was one of the organizers of the first 
bank in Hichmond, being one of the Directors. He was a 
member of the Society of Friends, and was an earnest worker 
in the cause of Christianity, as well as any enterprise of bene- 
fit to his township. He died Kov. 3, 1868, his wife having 
preceded him ten years. They were the parents of ten chil- 
dren, six born in Wayne Count3^ John A. was reared on a 
pioneer farm and was educated in the primitive log school- 
bouse. When he was eighteen years of age, Aug. 24, 1837, 
he married Charity, daughter of Jesse Brooks, who came to 
Indiana from North Carolina in 1836. They had a family of 
sevea children — Cecilia D., Jesse W., William M., Mary 
Ann, John A., Jr., Orlando B. and Charity Emma, the latter 
deceased. Mr. Locke has a fine farm of 200 acres, on section 
35, and is one of the representative men of Dalton Township. 
He has served in various offices of trust in the township, and 
was Magistrate ten years. He and his wile are members of 
the United Brethren church. His son William and his son- 
in-law Caleb Lamb were soldiers in the late civil war. Will- 
iam participated in eleven hard-fought battles, and at the 
second battle of Bull Run was severely wounded and taken 
prisoner. They are building a church of the United Brethren 
in Christ 30 x40 feet, on Mr. Locke's farm, our subject being 
the largest donor. 

Rufas M. Lumpklns, farmer and stock-raiser, section 26, 
Dalton Township, was born in what is now Dalton Town- 



DALTON TOWNSHIP. 453 

ship, Wajne County, April 15, 1835, the fifth son of James 
and Sarah (Thornburg) Lumpkins, the former a native of Vir- 
ginia, and the latter of Tennessee. They came to "Wayne 
County, Ind., in 1818, and resided three years in Perry 
Township after which they lived in Jefferson Township one 
yesir. They then moved to Dalton Township and purchased 
the farm now occupied by our subject, where they passed the 
rest of their daj's. Our subject received a common-school edu- 
cation and resided with his parents till he attained his ma- 
jority. He then purchased lands in Dallas County, Iowa, 
where he resided two years, when he sold out and returned 
to his native countv. He was married Seot. 9, 1858, to 
Rachel J., daughter of John W. Jordon, of Perry Township. 
Of their nine children seven survive — Mary C, America J., 
Llobert H., Sarah M. F., James, John C. and William A. 
Those deceased are — Charles and Orin. After his marriage 
he lived ten years on the farm now owned by William D. 
Jordon, after which he lived three years on the S. M. Jordon 
farm. He then purchased the old homestead, containing 
314 acres of well-improved land, where he has since resided. 
William Mendenhall^ son of Daniel and Deborah Men- 
denhall, was born in Guilford County, N. C, Sept. 7, 1798. 
He was married in 1819 to Rebecca, daughter of Joseph and 
Hannah Coffin. They were both reared on a farm and were 
principally educated in a school taught by Jeremiah Hub- 
bard, a noted school-tea clrer and preacher in the Friends' 
society, of which they were both members. After their mar- 
riage they remained in their native State and county till 1825, 
when, with three children, they removed to Indiana and lo- 
cated in Wayne County. They made the journey of 600 
miles with a little one-horse wagon, Mrs. Mendenhall driving 
and carrying an infant in her arms, and Mr. Mendenhall and 
a man named Joseph Nichols walking all the way. They had 
$40 when they left North Carolina, but after a journey of 
six weeks it was about exhausted. They reached Wayne 
County in September, and after stopping a short time with 
his brother Elijah, who lived near Washington, Mr. Menden- 
hall bought a farm two or three miles from Washington in 
the " Beech Flats," in the woods. They endured all the hard- 



454 HISTORY OF WAYNE COUNTY. 

ships of pioneer life, clearing up and impruving their farm. 
At that time the settlers assisted each other in their work, 
and one spring Mr. Mendenhall attended fifteen log-rollings 
in succession. They had trouble in keeping their stock, as 
the grain that was raised was needed in the family, and the 
stock could not run in the woods on account of the danger of 
their getting poisoned. The land was poor and the *crops 
uncertain, and in 1833 they moved to Perrv Township, two 
miles west of Economy. This was a much better farm, and 
was partly cleared. They were very energetic, and although 
Mr. Mendenhall was never very strong, they were enabled to 
give their children a common-school education. Their clothes 
were homespun and their shoes home-made, each child having 
one pair a year, going barefoot in the summer. Mr. Menden- 
hall was a modest, unassuming man, but his honesty and 
integrity were known by all who knew him. He early taught 
his children lessons of prudence and economy which have 
been useful to them in their later years. Mr. and Mrs. Men- 
denhall were active members of the Society of Friends, often 
riding twenty miles before eleven o'clock, horseback, in se- 
vere cold weather, to attend Quarterly Meeting. He was 
politically a Whig, and a friend and sympathizer of the col- 
ored man. After the formation of the Republican party he 
was one of its strong adherents. He died Oct. 2, 1880, aged 
eighty-two years and twenty-live days, having since his 
sixtieth year enjoyed better health, and been able to at- 
tend to his farm duties. Mrs. Mendenhall is still liv- 
ing, in her eighty-third year. They had a family of eleven 
children, three sons and eight daughters. One daughter died 
in infancy, the rest grew to maturity. 

Dempsey Thornl) urgh. section 24, Dalton Township, 
was borh Oct. 27, 1801, on the banks of Lost Creek, 
East Tennessee, a son of Walter and Mary (Baldwin 
Thornburgh, natives of North Carolina, of English descent, 
who came to Wayne County, Ind., in 1819, and settled on 
160 acres of Government land in Perry Township, subse- 
quently adding to it till they had 800 acres. After getting 
their children provided for they went to Economy, where he 
opened the first store in the place. Our subject was married 



DALTON TOWNSHIP. 455 

Dec. 22, 1822, to Jane, daughter of John and Mary (Davis) 
Mills, who came from Tennessee in an early day, first settling 
in Ohio, and in 1819 came to Wayne County. After his 
marriage Mr. Thorn burgh settled on the farm where he now 
resides. It was at that time heavily timbered, but he has 
lived to see it one of the finest farms in the township. Mr. 
and Mrs. Thornburgh had a family of twelve children, eight 
of whom are still living — Irena, wile of L. Dennis, of Dal- 
ton Township; Walter, of Carthage, Mo.; Zurilda, wife of 
S. Hutchins; Setli M., of Henry County, Ind. ; William K., of 
Dalton Township; Thomas E., of Delaware County, Ind. 
Mary J., Rachel, John and James are deceased. Mrs. Thorn- 
burgh died Sept. 23, 1880, after a married life of nearly three- 
score years, Mr. Thornburgh and his wife were members of 
the Society of Friends from earl^^ childhood. 

John Henry Thomburg, fifth son of Lewis and Lydia 
(Macy) Thornburg, was born in Dalton Township, Wayne 
County, Ind., Oct. 13, 1839. He resided on the farm with 
his parents till manhood, receiving a common-school educa- 
tion. Jan. 10, 1861, he married Mary A., daughter of John 
A. and Charity (Brooks) Locke. After his marriage he settled 
on his present farm in Dalton Township. He has sixty-four 
acres of fine land, and is eiigaged in farming, also dealing 
extensively in live-stock. Mr. Thornburg has served as 
Township Trustee eleven years, and Assessor four years. He 
has had a family of ten children — Leonora F., Lewis M., 
Lawrence D., Curtis A., Charlie R., Frank R., Emma F., 
Maurice E., Nellie, Maud and Earle. The latter died Sept. 
IT, 1883, aged three months. Mr. Thornburg is a member of 
the Society of Friends, and Mrs. Thornburg, of the 
United Brethren church. Mr. Thornburg's father, Lewis 
Thornburg, was the second son of Henry and Nancy (Maulby) 
Thornburg, and was born Feb, 2, 1802. His wife was Lydia, 
daughter of Barachiah Macy. Of their twelve children, five 
are still living — Colman, Orlando, Isaac, Lewis and John 
Henry. In 1862 Mr. Lewis Thornburg removed to Dallas 
County, Iowa, where he still resides. His wife died in 1870. 
Henry Thornburg, grandfather of the subject of our sketch, 
was born in North Carolina, June 26, 1773, and when a boy 



456 HISTORY OF WAYNE COUNTY. 

removed with his father to Wayne County, Tenn. He was 
married in 1794 to Nancy Maulby, also a native of ISTorth 
Carolina, born Nov. 21, 1771. To them were born eight 
children, all of whom lived to be over fifty years of age, and 
four of whom are still living — Lewis, Ellinor, Rachel and 
John. Lydia, Sophia, Larkin, Henry and an adopted son, 
William, are deceased. In 1819 he removed to Wayne 
County, Ind., and entered a ti'act of land, residing here till 
his death, engaged in farming and tanning. He built a tan- 
nery on his farm, the marks of the old vats being still visible. 
He died at the age of eighty-nine years and his wife, aged 
ninety-seven. They were members of the Society of Friends. 
Daniel Ulrich^ retired farmer, section 4, Dalton Town- 
ship, was born in Bedford County, Pa., Sept. 23, 1794, a son 
of John and Christina (Brombaugh) Ulrich, who were natives 
of Pennsylvania, of German descent. His youth was spent 
in assisting his father on the farm and working in his father's 
saw, and carding mill. He was married in 1816 to Catherine 
Holsinger, of Pennsylvania, by whom he had five children, 
three now living — Samuel, Christina and Catherine. John 
and Susannah are deceased. His wife died in 1828, and in 
1829 he married Mrs. Catherine (Clapper) Hoover. Six chil- 
dren were born to them — David, Martin, Elizabeth, Annie (de- 
ceased), Rosanna and Daniel D. Mr. Ulrich and his father 
came to Wayne County, Ind., with their families in 1822, 
and settled on the land where our subject now lives. They 
purchased 800 acres of Government land. His father died 
about thirty years after coming to this county. Mr. Ulrich 
is now eighty-nine years of age and has retired from active 
life, but still retains his mental and physical vigor to a re- 
markable extent. He has been an active member of the 
German Baptist church for many years. His wife died in 
June, 1863. 



CHAPTER XIII. 



GREEN TOWNSHIP. 



Where Located. — Bound aky Lines. — N^umber of Acres. — 
First Election. — Its Water Supply. — Population. — Val- 
uation. — Comparison of Wealth. — Early Settlement. — 
lONEERS. — Sundries, Relating to Business. — Williams- 
burg. — When Founded. — By Whom Platted. — Location. 
— Population. — Business of 1870 and 1884. — Churches 
and Lodges. — Biographical. 

where it is located. 

This is in the north tier of townsliips, and is the central one, 
it being eight miles on each side from the east and west 
county lines. It is bounded on the north by Randolph 
County, on the east by New Garden and Webster townships, 
on the south by Webster, Centre and Clay townships, and on 
the west by Clay and Perry townships. It is five miles 
square, with an addition on the south side of three and one- 
half sections, extending in the center two miles south of the 
square, the last mile being a half section. Just why this 
county of Wayne has been cut into townships out of all reason- 
able shape is hard to determine. The cultivation of symmetry 
has not been chronic. The area thus covered is twenty-eight 
and one-half square miles, or 18,240 acres of land. Of this 
amount 18,182.68 acres are found on the assessment roll, 
which shows a closer assessment, or more arable land, than 
many other townships in the county. The township was or- 
ganized November, 1821, and the first election was held at 
the house of Seth May. It is a good township of land and 
the farmers have placed themselves in an independent posi- 
tion financially. 

The principal stream in the township is Green's Fork, 
30 457 



458 



HISTORY OF WAYNE COUNTY. 



named after John Green, a somewhat noted Indian who 
adopted an English name and was vvell-lcnown by the early set- 
tlers. It enters the township in the northeast corner and 
flows southwesterly through the township. It has quite a 
number of small tributaries on its west side, all rising withiui 
the township, and one branch on its east bank. On the west « 
side of the township Morgan's Creek enters from the north 
and traverses nearly the entire west side of the township. 
"Williamsburg is the only village, and is in the south-central 
part of the township, mostly on the southeast quarter of sec- 
tion 6. 

The township had a population in 1850 of 1,532; in 1860, 
1,319; in 1870, 1,293; in 1880, 1,189, showing a steady de- 
cline each decade for the past thirty years. 

The assessed valuation of the township, Jan. 1, 1883, was: 
On real estate, $612,235; personal property, $346,960; total, 
$959,195, there being but four townships in the county that 
has a greater aggregate of wealth, and these, with the excep- 
tion of Jackson Township, are considered considerably larger. 
Taking area and population together. Green is the richest 
township in the count3^ 



COMPARISON. 



Green assessed. 

Jackson 

Centre 

Washington.. . . 
Wayne 



AREA, ACRES- 



18,182.68 
16,673 77 
26,837.08 
26,511.98 
31,216.32 



POPULATION. 



1,189 
5,294 
2,307 
2,015 

4,586 



WEALTH. 



959 195 
1,808,317 
1,591,667 
1,719,549 
3,341.270 



Richmond not included in Wayne Township. 



ITS EARLY SETTLEMENT. 



The first settler who is credited with locating in this town- 
ship was John Lewis, from T^Torth Carolina, who settled on 
section 7, in the year 1810. His son Joseph now lives upon 
and owns the homestead. Richard Lewis, then past the age 
of twenty-one years, came with his father, and these two 
were without neighbors until the spring of the following year. 
Henry Way then came and settled on section 5; Seth Way, on 
section 6; Paul Way, on section 29, now owned by his son 



GEEEN TOWNSHIP. 459 

Joseph — all from Korth Carolina; Joshua Craiior, on section 
S, his son Milo succeeding him and living on the original 
farm; Reuben Joy, on section 32, northeast of Williamsburg. 
These all came during the last mentioned year. 

In the southeast part of the township Joseph Comer, 
where now Joseph Comer, his son, resides; Joseph Palmer, 
where Daniel Palmer resides; Henry Gower, and James Ir- 
win; first settler on their lands; Thomas Teagle, where now 
a son resides. Joseph Evans, from JS'ew Jersey, entered sev- 
eral quarter-sections on sections 18 and 19; John Catey, from 
New Jersey, also several quarter sections, Joseph Personett, 
from Maryland, settled on land now owned by Benj. B. Bev- 
erlin. Wm. Beverlin, from Virginia, settled as earJy, proba- 
bly, as 1812, on section 8, now owned by his son Thomas, and 
John Catey, where the latter now resides; Jesse B icon, from 
New Jersey, on section 8 and northwest quarter of section 9; 
Henry Catey, from New Jersey, where Samuel Catey resides, 
one and a half miles southeast from town; Thomas Bond, 
south line of township, land now owned by his heirs. 

In 1814 John Green came from North Carolina and settled 
on section 30, and was accompanied by Joseph Ladd 
and his son, William Ladd, the latter locating on section 
36. Joseph Ladd settled on the northeast quarter of 
section 31, and Amos W. Ladd, on section 35. Benjamin 
Hutchins came from the same State, and settled one and 
a half miles north of Williamsburg, or where it now 
stands, also in 1811:, and Thomas Hutchins, a half mile south 
of him, on section 31. Benj. Hutchins afterward removed 
to the farm, near the United Brethren meeting-house. John 
Hutchins settled a mile northwest from town. 

In the northeast part, Daniel Charles, about 1816, settled 
on section 28; land now owned by Henry Charles and Han- 
nah Blair. In 1816, from North Carolina, came Abel Lomax. 
His land is now owned by James Frazer's heirs, section 32; 
Elijah Wright, where Alexander Wright lives; Jeremiah 
Stegall, on section 30, on land owned by Alexander Stegall; 
Wm. Cook with his sons, Cornelius and James, about four 
miles northwest from town, on section 25; land now owned 
by his heirs and descendants. 



460 HISTORY OF WAYNE COUNTY. 

Henry Study, a native of Maryland, in 1818, a mile west 
of town wliere his son John resides, on the northeast quar- 
ter of section 7. Mr. Study is said to have had the first iron 
mold-board plow in Wayne County. 

Charles Spencer, a native of Connecticut from Pennsyl- 
vania, in 1819, settled where he now resides, one and one-half 
miles south of town. He is said to have made, in 1820, 
the first pegged shoes ever made in Wayne County, and 
in 1821 the first iron mold-board plow. 

Henry Catey, a native of Germany, from New Jersey in 
1821, settled one and one-half miles southeast from town, 
where he resided until his death in 1850, aged about eighty 
years. John, his son, now lives one and one-half miles south 
of town. 

Anthony Chamness, a native of North Carolina, settled on 
section 7; his son Joshua now has the homestead. Joshua 
Murphy settled where Harvey Harris lives, also from North 
Carolina, as was Jacob Cook, who located on section 33. Eleazer 
Smith was another North Carolinian, and settled on section 
20, his farm now being owned by his son, William D. Smith. 
Valentine Pegg came from the same State and made his home 
on sections 19 and 20, and John Pegg, on section 21, now 
owned by his son John. A good many North Carolinians 
made their homes in this township. Others of the early settlers 
were Drury Davis, on section 12; Jesse Young, section 18; 
Samuel Ball, on section 13; Charles Spencer, on the same 
section, also John Cain; Benj. Satterwaite on section 18; 
Henry Oler, section 11, now owned by his son Henry; Luke 
Dillon, on section 2; as was also Joshua Ballenger and Benj. 
Ballenger. The sons of Henry Study, Sr., viz.: Henry, 
Joseph, David and Isaac, all located on lands embraced in 
sections 26 and 35; a Mr. Elliott, on section 35, and Nathan 
Riley, an Ohioan, on section 36. Jesse Baldwin came from 
North Carolina, and located on section 26; John Beard, on 
section 23, and came from Maryland. In later years section 
23 was owned by E. and J. T. Cates, Geo. W. Scantland and 
Peter Hardwick. John Saintmeyer purchased his homestead 
on section 35, and his sons now occupy the farm; Washing- 
ton Cranor, on the Cranor farm. George Johnson located in 



GREEN TOWNSHIP. 461 

the east part of towiisliip at present owned by Thos. Edwards, 
and Levi Jessap, on sections 9 and 16, some two miles sonth- 
east of Williamsburg. William Trotter and Hugh L. Macy, 
settled on section 28, and Jeremiah Thorp, from Tennessee, on 
section 20. There are a few others of the early settlers that 
could be mentioned but space is limited. 

SUNDRIES. 

The first wagon -maker was Win. Richter. 

The first school in the township was kept by Joseph Lewis, 
in a log house on his father's farm. 

The first blacksmiths in the township were William Under- 
hill, below town, and Joseph Way, one and one-half miles 
northeast from the town. Also, Kanan Roberts and Moses 
Davndson were early blacksmiths. 

Richard Lewis, the first Justice of the Peace. Other early 
Justices were Barnabas McManus, Joseph Ladd, John Green, 
Joseph Lewis, Samuel Johnson. 

It has no railroad, but a proposed line if ever built would 
pass through the west side of the township. 

Abel Lomax served two or more years as Representative, 
and a term of two years as Senator in the Legislature; and Jo- 
seph Lewis as a Representative, at the session of 1845-'6. 

A fort and block-house were built during the war of 1812, 
on the farm of John Lewis, by John, Joseph and Richard 
Lewis, Joshua and Thomas Cranor, Setli Way and others. 
About three miles northeast from this another, on land now 
owned by Thompson Smith, was built by William Whitehead 
and others, and called the " Whitehead block-house." 

The Friends formed a society a few years later, and built 
a log house about three and one-half miles northeast from 
town. After an existence of about fifteen years the society 
was discontinued. 

Wm. Johnson built the first grist-mill about the year 1818, 
where the present mill in Williamsburg stands. A year 
or two later Stacey B. Catey built a saw-mill one and one- 
half miles below town, where also a grist-mill was built. 
About the same time Reuben Joy built a saw-mill one and 
one-half miles above town; and a few years after Hugh 



462 HISTORY OF WAYNE COUNTY. 

Johnson built a grist-mill ; both are now owned by Jesse 
Rej'nolds. ^ 

The Baptists pi'obably {'ormed the first church in the town- 
ship, which was organized Nov. 21, 1818, about three miles 
north of town. Among the first members and those who 
joined soon after were: Isaiah Case, Benj. Jones, Eleazer 
Smith, and their wives; James Martin, Haimah Case, Polly 
McQuary, Jeremiah Swafford, Sarah and Rebecca Potter, 
David Frazer, Margaret Shoemaker, Nathaniel Case and John 
Stigleman and their wives. Rev. William Oldham, from 
Salem church, Rev. ~ — - Martin, from Elkhorn, and others, 
ofliciated at the organization. In June, 1819, Benj. Jones 
and Nathaniel Case were ordained Deacons. In December, 
1819, Rev. Isaac Cotton became their minister, and contin- 
ued his pastoral labors about twenty years. He was suc- 
ceeded by Nathaniel Case about six years, and Andrew Baker 
some ten or twelve years. Henry Rupe, Mr. Lyons, and 
others have supplied the church at different times. Meetings 
were first held in a log honse. 

The church is located near the section line between sections 
28 and 29 and on the northwest quarter of section 28. A 
frame building was erected in 1830, which continued in use 
until about 1860, when a substantial brick edifice was built 
and neatly finished. 

WILLIAMSBCTKG. 

The town of Williamsburg is the capital of Green Town- 
ship and is the only town within its limits. It is situated 
on the south half of the east half of the southeast quarter of 
section 6, and was platted March 16, 1830, by Wm. Johnson, 
the survey beinff made on that date by John Frazier. The 
plat and survey was made of record March 23, 1830. 

It lies in the midst of a splendid agricultural country, and 
notwithstanding that the township has decreased nearly thirty 
percent, in population the last third of a century, the village 
has continued to grow, slowly to be sure, but is the only town 
in the county that has gained in the face of a declining town- 
ship to the number it has. 

Its population in 1850 was 219; in 1860, 234; in 1870, 248; 
in 1880, 273. 



GEEEN TOWNSHIP. 463 

It has an assessed valuation, real and personal, of over $100- 
000, and there is no healthier town in the county of Wayne. 

The first merchant in Williamsburg was (name lost), who 
commenced trade about the year 1831, prior to which time 
the inhabitants were supplied at Richmond. Of those who 
have since traded for longer or shorter periods were: John 
Pennington, Joshua and Thomas Cranor, Stephen and Samuel 
Johnson, Stephen Coffin, eight or ten years in the firms of 
B. & S. Coffin and And^-ew Purviance & Co., Pleasant Un- 
thank and Griffin Davis, afterward Davis alone. 

Dr. Curtis Otwell was the first resident physician, the in- 
habitants having been previously served chiefly by Dr,s. War- 
ner and Kerl, of Richmond, Waldo, of Jacksonburg, and Way, 
of Newport. After Otwell, George Blair. 

BUSINESS OF 1870. 

The business interest of the town has never been very large. 
In the year 1870 there were three general stores kept and 
owned respectively by Jas. L. & Asher Pearce, Griffin Davis 
and William Campbell; grist and saw mill, by JesseReynolds; 
carriage and wagon shops, by Wm. Richter and Reynold 
Bros. ; blacksmiths, Elias and John Roberts and the Richter 
Bros.; physicians. Dr. L. P. Taylor and Dr. Jno. T. Cheno- 
weth, and the usual number of mechanics and artisans. The 
growth of the town has not been such as to increase the 
volume of business to any perceivable extent. 

THE BUSINESS INTERESTS OF 1883. 

Merchants: James L. Pearce, Asher Pearce, Wm. P. Camp- 
bell, O. G. Davis. Grocerynien, Roberts & Saintmeyer. Drug- 
gist, Oscar R. Baker. Saddler, John T. Smelser. Shoe store, 
Yernon Reynolds. Tailor, Thomas J. Neal. Plasterer, Geo. 
Roberts. Planing mill, Reynolds Bros. Hotel, B. H. Rey- 
nolds. Carriage manufacturers, Richter Bros. Undertakers, 
John A. Stanley, O. G. Davis. Blacksmiths, Geo. Sheppard, 
Elias Roberts. 

Mills: Grist-mill, C. Y. Ryland, proprietor; saw-mill, 
Woolley & Son, proprietors. 

Postmasters: John Hough, about 1832. Fernando H. Lee, 



464 HISTORY OF WAYNE COUNTY. 

April 1, 1837. Moses Davisson, Sept. 16, 1839. Samuel 
Johnson, Nov. 27, 1849. Joseph F. Reynolds, June 12, 1862. 
Wm. P. Campbell, May 18, 1863. James R. Elliott, Sept. 
24, 1863. James L. Fearce, Dec. 2, 1864. The latter is still 
Fostmaster, having been in continuous service for nearly 
twenty years. 

CHURCHES. 

The United' Brethren organized a church about the year 
1845. After a few months' preaching, a class was formed, 
of which the following named persons were members: James 
Jester and Lucretia, his wife; Benj. Harris and Lydia, his 
wife; Samuel Johnson and Catharine, his wife; Herbert 
C. Fierce and Margaret, his wife; Susanna Cranor, James 
and Fhebe Stevenson. Their first meetings were held 
in private rooms in Williamsburg, afterward in a school-house, 
three-quarters of a mile east of town. Their present house, 
about half a mile northeast from town, was built about the 
year 1855. Their first preacher was Rev. Isaac Robinson, 
who was succeeded by the Revs. Wm. Ault, "Wm. Kendrick, 
Robert Morris, Thomas Evans and the Rev. Mr. Smith, the 
present pastor. 

A Methodist Episcopal Church and society was formed in 
the year 1818. Among its first members were Abel Lomax, 
Henry Study, Joshua Ballenger, Nathan Riley, and their 
wives. Their first church was a log house, where that of the 
United Brethren now stands, about half a mile west of town. 
A brick house was afterward built in its place. In 1851 
their present church building in town was erected. Their 
ministers have been: Revs. Joseph Tarkington, Miltideus 
Miller, John Kiger, John Bnrt, Mr. Morrison, Caldwell Rob- 
bins, John Metzker, Benj. Smith, Asahel Kinnan, Ner Phil- 
lips, George Newton, Abraham Gorrell, Lewis Roberts, John 
F. Pierce, and their present pastor, the Rev. Mr. Peck. 

I. o. o. F. 

An Odd Fellows Lodge, the Chlnharorer, No. 120, was 
instituted Nov. 25, 1852, on application of Wm. Silver, Wm. 
Brown, James H. Stanley, D. Dinwiddle and Abel Evans. 



GKEEN TOWNSHIP. 465 

Its officers were: Wm. Silver, IST. G*; James H. Stanley, Y. 
G.; James Smith, Rec. Sec; Sylvester Hollister, Treas. Of- 
ficers in 1872: Samuel Catey, N. G.; Danley Palmer, Y. G. ; 
Addison C. Reynolds, Rec. Sec. ; Barzillai H. Reynolds, Per. 
Sec; Joseph D. Cranor, Treasurer. 

BIOGKAPHICAL. 

£sra £alle7igfer, farmer and dealer in stock, near Williams- 
burg, was born in Green Township, Wayne Co., Ind., Dec. 
20, 1836. He was reared on a farm, and obtained a good 
business education in the schools of his native village, Will- 
iamsburg. He remained at home till he grew to manhood, 
and has followed farming through life. He is one of the 
successful farmers and stock-raisers of his township, making 
a specialty of line hogs. He was married March 4, 1858, to 
Martha, daughter of George and Martha Debilbiss, of Lick- 
ing County, Ohio. Her parents are of French descent. Mr. 
and Mrs, Ballenger have had three children — Will E., dry 
goods merchant in Cambridge City, Ind.; Harry M., died at 
the age of fifteen years, and Izzie B., aged fifteen years. 
Mr. Ballenger has been a member of the Board of Education 
of Williamsburg a number of years. He is a member of 
Chinkarorer Lodge, No. 120, I. O. O. F., and of Encampment 
No. 74, Williamsburg. He is also a member of the Grand 
Encampment of the State. Politically he is a Republican. 
His grandparents, William and Anna (Sharp) Ballenger, were 
born, reared and married in Virginia, and afterward lived in 
Kentucky, where Charles B., our subject's father, was born Feb. 
17, 1810, and when he was twelve years old his parents removed 
to Green Township, Wayne Co., Ind. William Ballenger 
entered the Revolutionary war at the age of eighteen years, 
and served till its close. He died in 1825. His wife died 
soon after coming to Wayne County. Charles B, began 
learning the wheelwright's trade at the age of sixteen, at 
which he worked seven years. The rest of his life has been 
spent in farming, which he has followed with much success. 
He was married June 3, 1830, to Eliza Scovell, born March 
10, 1812, and died Aug. 4, 1881, a daughter of Orr and Mary 
Scovell. Seven children were born to them — Data, died when 



4^66 HISTORY OF WAYNE COUNTY. 

four years old ; Sylvester,, was an attorney at law at Cambridge 
City, Wayne County, where he died at the age of forty- 
one years; Ezra, our subject; Martin, was killed by lightning, 
May 27, 1873; Charles, an attorney at law in Indianapolis, 
who died March 10, 1880; Sarah J., wife of Daniel Bradbury, 
of Indianapolis, and Mary A., wife of Lafayette Coggshall, 
of Green Township. ' 

Oscar Rowan Baker^ ox\\y son of Jacob and Yiletta (Swain) 
Baker, was born at Centreville, Wayne Co., Ind., Sept. 21, 
1854. He attended the country schools, and afterward com- 
pleted his education at Spiceland College, Henry County, 
Ind., graduating in 1880. During his college course he 
taught school nine years. When through his college course 
he purchased his present drug store, succeeding Dr. Helm in 
the business. He was married Aug. 8, 1878, to Mary, 
daughter of Jonathan and Ellen (McWhinney) Aydelott, of 
Preble County, Ohio. They have three children — Viletta E., 
Frank T. and Kate. Mrs. Baker is a member of the Chris- 
tian church. Politically Mr. Baker is